Entertainment

afro latino Movies Encapsulate The Black And Experience From Sci-Fi To Documentaries

What are you doing to celebrate Black History Month? If your answer is something such as “what can I do?” Here’s a tip: lots! Education and understanding is the first step at correcting ignorance of other cultures. We’ve narrowed down the best afro movies about the Black experience that will feed your soul and your mind. While some of these may be fictional (even sci-fi), there’s still an abundance of truth within them. This kind of binge-watching is actually good for you, so happy Black History Month!

“Loving”

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While many of us might be in interracial relationships, these legal unions weren’t always allowed. If it weren’t for the love and bond between Mildred and Richard Loving, many of us wouldn’t be able to get married simply because of the color of our skin. “Loving” tells the story of this extraordinary couple who fought for love and won.

“Moonlight”

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Being Black is hard enough, now imagine what that must feel like for a gay Black boy. The discrimination and bigotry toward this community, within their own community, is horrific, which why this movie is so important to witness.

“The Color Purple”

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Based on the book by Alice Walker, “The Color Purple” shows what life for Black people was like during the slave era and its lasting repercussions. The movie is powerful, moving, and unforgettable.

“BlacKkKlansman”

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If you watch this movie without knowing it’s a true story, there’s no way someone would ever fathom that something like a Black man infiltrating the KKK could be possible. But it is, which makes this movie even better. Directed by Spike Lee, and based on the story of Ron Stallworth, the film not only looks at life for Black people post Civil Rights movement, but how it is today.

“Get Out”

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Yes, “Get Out” is a scary af movie, but what makes it scarier is understanding how the feelings of being in the “Sunken Place” is very accurate and very real. Gentrification isn’t something that can just happen in communities; it can also occur to your mind.

“Malcolm X”

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This movie starring a young Denzel Washington tells the story of American Muslim minister and human rights activist, Malcolm X. While he and Martin Luther King Jr valued the same equality, they had very different beliefs on how to achieve that. This film focuses on his life, his work, and his legacy.

“Black Panther”

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“Wakanda Forever” isn’t a make-believe place that exists in another world. It is also a state of mind. That is something that will resonate with you after watching “Black Panther” which is way more than a superhero movie.

“13th”

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If you genuinely want to feel depressed but also educated you must watch this Ava DuVernay-documentary. It will not only school you on the incredibly unjust justice system in the country, but it will also show how America has been against Black people from the very start.

“Sorry To Bother You”

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One of the trippest movies about the Black experience has to be “Sorry To Bother You” about what it’s like trying to get out of poverty while being Black and seeking to climb that social ladder.

“Pelo Malo”

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Trying to be beautiful as a brown person isn’t an easy thing, especially when society tells you the white and straight hair is better. In “Pelo Malo” — bad hair— we meet a young Venezuelan boy who wants to straighten his curly hair and as a result, causes tension with himself and his single mom. another movie part of the repertoir of afro latino movies

“Roots”

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Written by Alex Haley — “Roots” became a phenomenon as a mini-series not only for an extraordinary cast but more important because of its historical value. The story centers around a slave named Kunta and his family, which begins in the 1800s. It’s a compelling look at slavery in America and what people will do for their freedom.

“The Pursuit of Happyness”

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Chris Gardner, a single father of a young boy, is a smart man, there’s no question about that. However, being an intelligent Black man sometimes isn’t enough in this country. This true story shows what exact determination looks like, and what the human spirit is capable of especially when you’re trying to raise a family.

“Selma”

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While many of us might know the story of Martin Luther King, some of us don’t understand the kind of work he did in communities that resulted in his massive legacy. “Selma” shows precisely that.

“Black In Latin America”

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What does being Black actually mean? The answer to that is the focus to this 2011 documentary starring Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. who explores “how Africa and Europe came together to create the rich culture of Latin America and the Caribbean.” The documentary features Black people from six countries including Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Cuba, Brazil, Mexico, and Peru. one of the best afro latino movies

“Standing in the Shadows of Motown”

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To understand the birth of rock and roll is to realize that it began with the rhythm and blues, which is a sound that was created by black singers and musicians. “Standing in the Shadows of Motown” is a documentary that shows how America embraced the sound and music of Black people but only when a white man was singing it.

“12 Years a Slave”

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When we see movies about slavery, for some reason, they always take place in the south. One reason for that is because there were Black people on the northeast coast that were living as free people. “12 Years A Slave,” tells the true story of one such Black man that was educated, a musician, and was free, until he wasn’t.

“Hoop Dreams”

afro latino movies
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Black boys that live in poverty in the inner city who dream about getting out of that situation can at times only turn to their talents as their ticket out. For some it could be as artists, for others it can be sports. “Hoop Dreams” looks at the lives of a few young men in Chicago who have aspirations of going pro in the NBA. However, sometimes their reality can keep them from getting there. This is an extraordinary documentary about what it looks like to have a desire to improve your life.

City of God”

afro latino movies
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Someone’s life can dramatically be different if only they made a left turn instead of a right. For two friends growing up in Rio — and in one of the most poverty-stricken neighborhoods in the world – one chooses to be a photographer while the other gets involved in the drug world. But are they all that different especially when they’re from the same place? this afro latino movie shows that

“Fruitvale Station”

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Police brutality in the U.S. is a real thing that had existed long before we ever had cell phones to capture it. “Fruitvale Station” is a true story about a young Black man who was killed at the hands of police, thankfully because of good people watching out for each other, we can know the truth about what happened that night.

“Buena Vista Social Club”

afro latino movies
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When Fidel Castro took over Cuba, it’s as if time stood still and even the music of that time was erased simply because of politics. In afro latino movie , we meet old Cuban musicians that reunite to bring back the music of pre-Castro when Cuba was still thriving, which in turn jump starts their musical career once again.

“Barry”

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Former President Barack Obama made history when he was elected the first Black president of the United States, so his story is a crucial one to know. In “Barry” we see how the young man came to be one of the most believed presidents of all time.

READ: You Have To Check Out These Spanish-Language Movies On Netflix Right Now

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How Afromexicanos Fought For Their Place on the 2020 Mexico Census and Why It Took So Long

Things That Matter

How Afromexicanos Fought For Their Place on the 2020 Mexico Census and Why It Took So Long

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Black history month is the time of year that we shine a spotlight on the rich and unique history of people of African descent in the United States–a past that has consistently been downplayed, ignored, and in some cases, erased from our history books.

At this point, it’s evident that the Black experience is not a monolith–there is no “one way” to be Black. And yet, many people still struggle to comprehend the fact that Afro-Latinos exist.

When you hear the term Afro-Latino, you might immediately think of a few Caribbean Spanish-speaking nations with explicit ties to the African diaspora–Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Cuba, for example.

But the fact is, Black people are everywhere in Latinidad. But Afro-Latinos in non-Caribbean countries often feel overlooked, erased. And this phenomenon is especially true for afromexicanos.

In 2020, after years of fighting, Afro-Mexicans finally got recognition on the Mexican census.

The question was simple, but powerful: “Por sus costumbres y tradiciones, ¿se considera usted afromexicano, negro o afrodescendiente?” (“Based on your culture and traditions, do you consider yourself Afro-Mexican, black or Afro-descendant?”)

For Americans, especially, it can be hard to understand why the question wasn’t on the census in the first place. After all, Americans live in a country where identities are divided into strict categories: Black, white. Hispanic, non-Hispanic.

But for Mexicans, the concept of race and ethnicity is a bit more complicated. To critics, separating people into Black, white, and Indiegnous categories on the census seemed divisive. Many Mexicans identify as mestizaje–a combination of indigenous, European, and, to some extent, African roots.

But for the organizers of the #AfroCensoMx campaign–a campaign to add the negro/afromexicano to the census–the movement was more than just identity politics.

Self-identifying as Black on the Mexican census is, of course, a little bit about pride in one’s identity, but it also has more practical concerns.

The census numbers who also inform organizations about socio-economic patterns associated with being Black in Mexico–information that is invaluable. Because as of now, afromexicanos have unique experiences that are informed by their heritage, their culture, and their place in the Mexican stratum.

As Bobby Vaughn, an African-American anthropologist who specializes in Black Mexicans, put it bluntly: “Mexicans of African descent have no voice and the government makes no attempt to assess their needs, no effort to even count them.”

But for afromexicano activists, being identified as such on the Mexican census is empowering.

Lumping all Mexicans together and ignoring their (sometimes very obvious) differences can have the effect of making certain groups feel erased. Yes, Black Mexicans are simply Mexicans–that fact is not up for debate. But stories abound of afromexicanos being discriminated against because of the way they look.

An Afro-Mexican engineer named Bulmaro García from Costa Chica (a region with a significant Black population) explained to The Guardian how he is grilled by border guards and asked to sing the Mexican national anthem whenever he crosses into Guerrero.

He says the guards’ behavior is “classic discrimination due to skin color. [They think] if you’re black, you’re not Mexican.”

The differences exist, and by acknowledging it, we are more able to speak truth to power.

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The Black and Afro-Latina Queens of ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ Discuss #BlackLivesMatter

Entertainment

The Black and Afro-Latina Queens of ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ Discuss #BlackLivesMatter

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The drag queens on the latest season of RuPaul’s Drag Race discussed the #BlackLivesMatter movement in the previous episode and it was real. They talked about the ways they were active during the protests last summer and what it means to be a queer person of color in the U.S. today.

Kandy Muse gave the conversation an Afro-Latina perspective.

While the queens were putting on their makeup in the workroom, LaLa Ri from Atlanta, brought up the topic of the #BlackLivesMatter movement. New York’s “Dominican Doll” Kandy Muse was the first to speak on her involvement in the protests.

“Being an Afro-Latino from the south Bronx, when I see Black people being murdered by police, it just puts so many things into perspective,” Muse said. “Fighting for Black lives and all those things are very, very important to me.”

Symone reminded the other queens of George Floyd’s murder by the police.  

Symone, who hails from LA, reminded her season 13 sisters that the murder of George Floyd last May by the police is what sparked the protests throughout the country.

“It’s sad that he to- that that had to happen, but I’m happy that people are waking the f*ck up because it’s always been there,” Symone said.

As a Black queen, Symone spoke to the trauma that Black people were facing with video of George Floyd’s murder being replayed in the media.

“Even with [the] corona[virus] going on, I felt immediately compelled to be involved in protests here in Los Angeles because enough is enough,” Symone recalled. “Things need to change.”

Lala Ri put some light on Rayshard Brooks‘ murder by the police.

During the discussion, LaLa Ri brought up that the murder of Rayshard Brooks at a Wendys in Georgia happened very close to their home.

“It kind of just really hit me that I could easily be in that drive-thru, and there’s a situation where they can pull me over just because I look like I don’t belong in that type of car,” LaLa Ri said.

As LaLa Ri relived that realization, she got emotional talking about it on the show.

“You could just be a Black person in the world and you could just get killed for nothing,” the queen said in tears. “It’s scary that you could just be killed just because of the color of your skin.”

Olivia Lux, an Afro-Puerto Rican queen from New Jersey, also mentioned how Black trans women are being murdered at a high rate.

“Statically Black trans lives at the most at risk,” Olivia Lux said.

Tamisha Iman wrapped things up with the words of John Lewis.

Tamisha Iman, a Black queen from Georgia, evoked the words of late Georgia Congressman and civil rights activist John Lewis to wrap up the conversation.

“Get in some good trouble!” the Georgia queen said in an empowering moment.

The clip was uploaded to RuPaul’s Drag Race YouTube channel on Feb. 1 in honor of Black History Month. Be watch the full video to see more of this necessary conversation.

READ: Denali is Serving Mexicana Representation on ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’

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