Entertainment

I Didn’t Think It Was Possible, But Yes, In 2019 ‘Educated’ People Are Still Calling Black People ‘Gorillas’

In another episode of “How Many Times Do I Have To Say Ouch?” an Oklahoma TV anchor Alex Housden said a gorilla at the Oklahoma City Zoo “kind of looks like you” to her Black cohost Jason Hackett. Now the morning TV anchor is getting a, clearly, extremely overdue lesson on the ignorance and severe consequences of such comparisons.

Housden made an apology the next morning on her show.

https://youtu.be/lGqklWq3ubk “I said something yesterday that was inconsiderate, it was inappropriate, and I hurt people,” Housden said crying. She really ramps up the white fragility real quick.  

But while her co-anchor Hackett is the victim, she has bee the one crying since.

https://twitter.com/CocoTheLeo/status/1166507091428892676 “I understand how much I hurt you out there and how much I’ve hurt you. I love you so much, and you have been one of my best friends for the past year and a half. And I would never do anything on purpose to hurt you. And I love our community and I want you all to know, from the bottom of my heart, I apologize for what I said. I know it was wrong and I am so sorry.”

We have to do better than this.

https://twitter.com/hotchef9/status/1166457033513689088  Housden did not acknowledge that what she said was racist. She did not even acknowledge what she said. Her apology is basically, “Sorry, I hurt you.” I mean, it could be an apology for missing lunch. In this climate, to be this vague is very harmful and hurtful. 

This lady works for the news. She is supposed to know some stuff about some stuff that definitely had happened and still happens on U.S. soil. Ringing any bells? Nobody is born “woke” but comparing Black people to monkeys and apes seems like pretty basic racism. If Housden is feigning innocence, if she is suggesting that she didn’t know any better, than wouldn’t she assume there are other white people who don’t know better too? Wouldn’t she want to educate them on this? Or maybe she doesn’t actually know why what she said was racist. Maybe she doesn’t know why she’s apologizing. Maybe she just wants the conflict to go away rather than addressing it head-on. This is so typical of white fragility. 

Jason Hackett is a poised king.

Hackett accepted her apology. I take no issue because the apology is his to accept, and he knows Housden better than I do. Hackett said he hoped the episode might help educate people.

“It cut deep for me and it cut deep for a lot of you in the community,” he said. “We have to understand the stereotypes. We have to understand each other’s backgrounds and the words that hurt, the words that cut deep.”

I don’t know any person of color that hasn’t had to maintain a happy face, that hasn’t had to swallow racist indignities, that hasn’t had to take the higher ground when so deeply insulted, just to keep a job. I hope this isn’t the case for Hackett. I hope he and Housden really are genuine friends. I hope it was an ignorant mistake rather than a wilfully ignorant mistake, I really do. I want to believe the best in white Americans. That’s so hard when I turn on the news. That’s so hard when people like Housden, with little grasp of the country’s history, are the arbiters of the news.

Comparing Black people to monkeys has a long history.

Wulf D. Hund and Charles W. Mills penned an extensive article on the origins and history of this horrible racist stereotype for the Huffington Post. In “Comparing Black People to Monkeys has a Long, Dark Simian History,” the authors note that scientists once categorized Black people as being related to chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans rather than human beings. This was “science” and this was in 1854 — not that long ago.

No more apologies.

You know what I say: the best apology is reparations and restorative justice. I am really sick of white people, whether they mean it or not, apologizing for doing racist things. Apologies do not dismantle anti-Blackness and bigotry in the United States. Apologies do not release migrant children from cages. Apologies do not equate to better opportunities for people of color. Apologies just make the apologizer feel better. 

The best apology a white person can give is actionable change. You’re sorry about racism? So I guess I’ll be seeing you at the next Black Lives Matter protest, right? Some white people do show up. Some white people do care. Those white people typically don’t compare Black people to gorillas. 

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An Abuelo Got A Hurtful Note From Bad Neighbors About His Decorations And Latino Twitter Came Into Comfort Him

Things That Matter

An Abuelo Got A Hurtful Note From Bad Neighbors About His Decorations And Latino Twitter Came Into Comfort Him

@goldenstef / Twitter

We are rarely more defensive than we are for our abuelos. The viejitos have always been there for us and seeing them treated unkindly is just heartbreaking. That is what one Twitter user experienced after her abuelo got a wretched note about his decorations outside his home.

This is the horrid letter left for @goldenstef’s abuelo by undesirable neighbors.

The letter, which is filled with misspelled words, calls the abuelo’s house an example of a “low class Mexican family.” The letter was written anonymously by neighbors and delivered to the abuelo in an attempt to shame him into changing his decorations. One of the most bizarre moments in the letter is when the angry author criticized the homeowner for having too many American flags claiming he isn’t patriotic and can’t fool the neighbors. Like, which one is it people?

The Twitter user followed up with photos of the house to show the decorations their abuelo has out front.

People flooded the Twitter post with comments supporting and sending love to the abuelo. Fellow Latinos are ready to stand with the abuelo and some just want the names of the people behind the letter so they can talk to them. Some people are stunned at how far the author was willing to go out of their way to be mean to an old man who just wants to decorate his home and front yard.

Latino Twitter wants to come together to let the abuelo know that his decorations are adorbs.

We need to come together to give her abuelo all of the wonderful decoration we love. Let’s turn his house and front yard into a showcase of all of the greatness that Latin America has to offer.

People are falling in love with this viejitos yard.

Honestly, this is a great yard. Who wouldn’t want a yard like this? This yard is original and adorable and worth all of the praise that we can muster. Thank you to people like this for making their yards something unique and worth seeing.

@goldenstef wants everyone to know just how much they appreciate the sweet messages about their abuelo’s yard.

It costs nothing to be kind. It is even better when you can be kind about something someone clearly cares so much about. Who cares if someone decorates their lawn a little too much. At least they are having fun with their lives and that is something we all need more of right now.

READ: Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Treasured Memories Of Their Abuelos And It’s Exactly What We Needed This Month

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“Sister, Sister” Actress Tia Mowry Broke Down In Tears Describing A Racist Incident She Experienced As A Teen

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“Sister, Sister” Actress Tia Mowry Broke Down In Tears Describing A Racist Incident She Experienced As A Teen

CBS Television Distribution

Back in the 90s, Tia and Tamera Mowry were experiencing the height of their fame while on the hit show “Sister, Sister.” The series which followed Tia and Tamera as Tia Landry and Tamera Campbell saw two actors play the part of two identical twins separated at birth and then accidentally reunited in their teens. It won several Emmys and Kids’ Choice Awards and cemented itself as essential Black TV. As a result, the twin sisters scored roles on other series, movies, and all kinds of media attention. And not for a lack of racist incidents that attempted to hold them back

Recently, Tia opened up about her experience as a Black teen actor in the 90s and shared a story that clearly still hurts her heart.

Speaking to Entertainment Tonight, Tia shared that she and her sister were once rejected from appearing in a teen magazine cover because of their skin color.

Speaking about the incident, Tia recalled how she’d been subjected to racism when she was a teen on the show and attempting to be on the cover of a popular magazine at the time.

“It was around Sister, Sister days. The show was extremely popular. We were beating — like in the ratings — Friends around that time,” Tia said. “So, my sister and I wanted to be on the cover of this very popular magazine at the time — it was a teenage magazine. We were told that we couldn’t be on the cover of the magazine because we were Black and we would not sell.”

The actress teared up as she went onto recall that “Here I am as an adult and, wow, it still affects me, how someone could demean your value because of the color of your skin,” she said. “I will never forget that. I wish I would have spoken up. I wish I would have said something then. I wish I would have had the courage to speak out and say that isn’t right.”

Years later Tia says she has used that moment to drive her in raising her two children.

Tia (who is a mother to Cree, 9, and Cairo, 2) says that “to this day, I’m always telling my beautiful brown-skinned girl that she is beautiful.”

“What I’ve done with my children is [reading] books,” she explained to People. “You can read incredible books to your children about Rosa Parks, about Martin Luther King Jr. — pivotal people that had a huge impact within the movement.”

“The other thing is through television, especially during this time,” she went onto explain. “I was just having my children watch a whole bunch of [things] that starred a lot of African American actors, and one of them is [TheWiz. You had Michael Jackson, Diana Ross. It was just such a great story. And my son … he loved it, [and] it’s important.”

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