Entertainment

This Father Hates Reggaetón But His Daughter Is A Bad Bunny Super Fan So They Wrote A Play About It

There is nothing that a Latino dad wouldn’t do for his princesa and that includes, apparently, writing a play about her and her adoration for the Boricua pop culture icon known as Bad Bunny. If that wasn’t enough, his daughter takes center stage at the play. Keep on reading for more on this adorbs padre-hija collaboration. If you are in Puerto Rico and are a Bad Bunny fan, you should definitely have a look… at least out of curiosity. 

The title of the play is “Mi Hija Ama a Bad Bunny”, o sea “My Daughter Loves Bad Bunny” and it will have a limited run at the end of the month.

Credit: Nuevo Día

The play was written by this man, Agustín Rosario, who will also direct. The play will have a limited run on September 27-29 at the Teatro Arrivi in Santurce and has previously done the rounds in community theaters throughout la isla del encanto. Seeing a family collaboration on the stage must be pretty special! Rosario had enjoyed success with two previous plays, “Hijas de su madre” and “Nos vamos pal cara”. Rosario returns to acting, and says: “I am acting again to be with my daughter in her professional debut and to collaborate in her development as an actor. 

It is being described as a comedy that explores an intergenerational clash… the dad hates reggaeton and the daughter lives for it! 

Credit: Instagram. @badbunnypr

Long story short, the dad thinks that Bad Bunny’s lyrics and overall persona is violent and not a good influence for his little princess. This is all told as the father is going through a marital breakup, so he is not in a very good place. He seems to be the typical viejo gruñón. So the table is set for a good old fashioned telenovela-like plot with plenty of enredos.

As Nuevo Dia describes it, the show is about “A generational gap and resentment due to his divorce”. Sounds like one of those movies that Robert DeNiro has starred in recently.

The male protagonist not only takes on his own personal crusade against music, but also against technology and anything else that doesn’t fit into his narrow, conservative worldview. The cast also includes Agustin Rosario, Ile Nicole Rosario, Noelia Crespo, Ali Warrington and Deddie Romero. 

The plot line is very similar to a real life story about a father who spoke out against the gender violence inherent in Bad Bunny’s lyrics… only for his daughter to ACTUALLY STAR in one of the raeggetonero’s music videos!

Credit: “Callaita”, YouTube, Bad Bunny

The poor man’s name is Pepo García and earlier this year he published a post on Facebook basically trashing Bad Bunny. Well, his daughter Natalia started a career in modeling and, lo and behold, she landed a great, star-making and profitable gig: the leading lady the video for the Bad Bunny song “Callaita”! Damn, las vueltas que da la vida, compas. Did Rosario draw inspiration from this real life event? BTW, Pepo García later retracted from his comments and wrote that the callaito should be him. Calladito te ves mas bonito! 

How many Latino fathers and daughters can relate to this story? We guess many! 

Credit: Facebook. Corporacion Teatro de Bellas Artes

Reggaeton is a very controversial genre due to the explicit nature of some of the lyrics and the fact that it embodies some ideas of toxic masculinity and traditional gender roles that are frankly medieval (we hate to admit it!). So the plot might resonate with many families where parents are literally scratching their heads over the stuff that their kids listen too! 

But we gotta remember that what was controversial a few years ago is no big deal now! 

Credit: Giphy. @maudit

Yes, there was a time when Elvis’ hip thrusts were deemed as immoral, as un insulto a las buenas costumbres. 

And let’s give Bad Bunny a break: he is actually pretty socially and politically engaged. Maybe the dad in the play can like him a little bit?

Credit: Instagram. @badbunnypr

When things got candentes in the island around the resignation of the now former governor Ricardo Roselló, he even paused his music career to join the protests that attempted to make Roselló step down as his homophobic and sexist views were made public.

Bad Bunny wrote then in an Instagram post: “I am pausing my career. After [my concerts] my agenda was to fly back to Miami. But I’m canceling everything. I’m pausing my career because I don’t have the heart or mind to do music […] I’m going to Puerto Rico. I’m not going to turn my back on you. We have to continue taking the streets”. And well, his efforts alongside Residente and Ricky Martin, paid off. 

Amid All The Drama Of The Latin Grammys And Urbano Music, Here’s What Happened At Last Night’s Latin Grammys

Entertainment

Amid All The Drama Of The Latin Grammys And Urbano Music, Here’s What Happened At Last Night’s Latin Grammys

NBC Universal / YouTube

The 2019 Latin Grammys hosted by Ricky Martin kicked off yesterday at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. There were some big wins for Juan Luis Guerra, Mon Laferte, Christian Nodal, Bad Bunny, Luis Enrique and — much to many Latinxs’ chagrin — Spanish singers Rosalia, who won Album of the Year, and Alejandro Sanz.

However, there were many highlights of the evening as well. Legends Celia Cruz, Juan Gabriel, Joan Sebastian, and Gustavo Cerati received a lavish tribute. Vincente Fernandez made his story when he brought his son Alejandro and grandson Alex Jr. on stage to perform. Bad Bunny gave a disruptive speech about the Latin Grammys snubbing reggaeton artists, and strangely enough, a member of Metallica showed up. These are the 2019 Latin Grammys highlights. 

A tribute to late Latinx legends ushers in a star-studded 2019 Latin Grammys. 

Brazillian singer Anitta was accompanied by merengue veterans Olga Tañon and Milly Quezada to perform a samba and merengue infused version of “La Vida es un Carnaval,” to honor Celia Cruz. Then Mexican crooners Carlos Rivera, Reik, and Leon Garcia came on stage to perform JuanGa’s “Querida.” 

Natalia Jimenez, Calibre 50, and Prince Royce performed Mexican singer-songwriter Joan Sebastian’s “Secreto de Armor.” Ricky Martin was joined by Draco Rosa, Fito Paez, and Beto Cuevas to honor Gustavo Cerati with their rendition of Soda Stereo’s “Musica Ligera.” 

Miguel sang in Spanish and everyone lost their minds.

Miguel performed a Spanglish version of “Show Me Love” with Alicia Keys. After the Mexican heartthrob sang his parts in Spanish, people on Twitter kind of lost it. 

“Miguel singing in Spanish is making me feel some type of waaaay *heart eyes*,” one user wrote. 

“Seeing @Miguel sing during the Latin Grammys with @aliciakeys was something else. Sensual and romantic at the same time,” another Twitter user wrote.

“My parents are watching Latin Grammys and I look up to see Miguel and Alicia Keys performing I was likeajxjdjxj,” a stunned user wrote. 

Mon Laferte bared her chest on the red carpet for Chilean rights.

We can’t exactly show you the full photo, but Chilean musician Mon Laferte, who won Best Alternative Music Album, bravely exposed her breasts to get the public’s attention about human rights in Chile. Written across her decollete in black ink were the words “En Chile Torturan Violan,” which translates to “In Chile They Torture, Rape, And Kill.” 

At least 20 people have been killed during protests in Chile about wealth inequality (the nation is one of Latin America’s wealthiest) and better social services following the government’s announcement of higher subway fares. Tens of thousands of protesters set up fiery barricades and confronted riot police in October. 

Vincente Fernandez showed three generations of Mexican artistry. 

“I’m a grateful man for my family and my music,” Vicente Fernandez said as he was joined on stage by his son Alejandro and grandson Alex. “When you listen to the voice of who has your blood, you feel immortal.” 

Alejandro performed his latest single “Caballero.” Throughout the tear-jerking performance by the trio, family photos were displayed in the background. 

 “I still needed to sing 50 more songs but I owe it to you. All I want to say to God and my public is that you know you are a part of me until the day they bury me. Thank you,” Vincente said after receiving a standing ovation. 

Bad Bunny stood up to the industry while accepting his reward. 

Bad Bunny scored his first Latin Grammy for Best Urban Album for X100Pre. Bunny was one of many artists to join Maluma in defending reggaeton against the industry’s consistent snubbing of musicians of the genre.

 “Reggaeton is part of Latin music,” he said. “To my colleagues, let’s give it our all. The genre has become about views and numbers but we have to bring different things to the table.”

Nella won Best New Artist. 

Venezuelan artist Nella, a Berkeley College of Music alumni, won Best New Artist. She snagged the tile from Paulo Londra, Greeicy, Aitina, and Cami. 

“This is for everyone who, like me, comes from another country looking for new opportunities,” she said.

Juanes win Person of the Year and gets a surprise from Metallica.

Colombian rock musician Juanes won Person of the Year after performing a medley of songs including “A Dios Le Pido” and “La Camisa Negra.” He was surprised by Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich who presented him the award. 

 “You guys changed my life,” Juanes told Ulrich. The drummer says he met Juanes ago while performing in Mexico. 

“Tonight we come full circle. I proclaim myself a Juanes fan, my friend, my parcero, I’m proud to recognize you as Person of the Year for the Latin Recording Academy,” Ulrich said. 

The Concha Burger Is Real And It May Be The Ultimate Food Mashup

Culture

The Concha Burger Is Real And It May Be The Ultimate Food Mashup

Elnortekitchen / Instagram

The burger, shake, and fries are enduring icons of American cuisine. This greasy, calorie-laden food is the stuff of American folklore. Integral to the iconography of the U.S. of A., burgers are the perfect meal anytime of day, any day. But a group of visionaries, added a twist to the American classic to switch it up a little —for the better. In a time of cultural hybridization, the blending of elements from different cultures, an All-American burger, paired with the quintessentially Mexican pan dulce resulted in the cultural hybrid of dreams. I give you: the concha burger. 

If you, like us, love a good pan dulce as much as you love a juicy burger, Mexican food pop up, El Norte, has something to say to you; ¿Por qué no los dos?

El Norte Kitchen, a Mexican food pop up that specializes in “Norteño” food —food typical of the northern region of Mexico— came up with a sweet and savory creation, that’s the stuff of Mexican-American dreams. Replacing the burger buns for a concha, this new sandwich is a sweet and savory delight that will satisfy both your cravings.

Run by a Latinx family, El Norte’s food has Sonoran roots with an Arizonan touch.

El Norte Kitchen is a Pop-Up Restaurant run by the Allen Family. The pop up creates unique Mexican inspired dining experiences in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. The Latinx family lived in Tucson, Arizona for years, which is why their food is influenced by the culinary delights they tried in their many travels to the southwestern city.

Ben Allen is the head chef and founder of the pop up and he has a deep love affair with Mexican food.

Ben Allen —the chef and owner of El Norte Kitchen— is devoted to Sonoran food, this love stems from his move from Minnesota to Tucson at 19. He had planned on going to school but ended up cooking across several kitchens instead—falling in love with the region’s style of Mexican food in the process.

The team at El Norte Kitchen works hard to innovate and offer their guests an experience that is fun, delicious and unforgettable —I mean, who could forget a concha burger?

Buttered and cut in half, the concha is stuffed with a beef patty, pepper Jack cheese, bacon, jalapeños, and pickled onions. Sadly though, it was a short-lived offer. Ben Allen told Fork Yeah about how they came up with the idea and how excited guests were to get their hands on this little piece of culinary heaven. “We let everybody know ahead of time that it was just kind of a trial and error test run and we’d be doing a limited quantity,” said Allen. “About an hour before we opened that morning for the pop up, we had a full bar waiting for these burgers.” “When we started serving them we actually sold out in about 20 minutes.”

El Norte Kitchen also serves Sonoran-style burritos and hot dogs.

If you’ve never had a Sonoran-style burrito, know that they are worth waiting in line for, outside and around the block. That is, after all, the strength of the pop-up: stuff you can’t get around here anywhere else. Stuff like El Norte burritos, which start with specially ordered flour tortillas, arriving from Arizona, filled and then re-seared on the flat-top to give it a golden patina and crunch. The pop up also serves up Sonoran Hot Dogs, wrapped in bacon, seared, and finished with mayo, beans, and avocado; carne asada fries, perfect churros, and more —hungry yet?

Allen’s favorite burrito is the “California style”

“It’s kind of that all in one meal, you get your steak, you get your French fries, all wrapped in a tortilla. So that was my go to meal on drunk nights or early mornings,” shares Allen. “It was just that one and done.” The California burrito famously has steak, french fries, guacamole, cheese and beans all wrapped up in a bomb of calories and delicious goodness.

Find El Norte Kitchen in St. Paul, Minnesota. Follow their social media or visit their website to find out where they’ll be popping up next.