Entertainment

25 Times Latinos Have Graced The Google Doodle

Google has become well known for it’s regularly tributed to some of the most famed people in history. Unsurprisingly, Latinos make up a massive bundle of Google’s over 900 doodles. Here’s a list of the most popular Latinos most recently immortalized by Google and their Doodles.

Gabriel García Márquez

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: March 6, 2018

Gabriel José de la Concordia García Márquez was a Colombian novelist and journalist, known across the Latin American community as Gabo throughout Latin America. He is considered one of the most influential and acclaimed authors of the 20th century.

Age: (1927-2014) Died at 87

Place of birth: Aracataca, Colombia

Katy Jurado

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: January 16, 2018

Katy Jurado, was a  famed Mexican actress whose career in film helped her make a name for herself in Mexico and Hollywood. She was already an established an actress in the 1940s when she moved to Hollywood and became a regular in Western films of the 1950s and 1960s.

Age: Died at 78 (1924-2002)

Place of birth: Mexico City, Mexico

Elvia Carrillo Puerto

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: December 6, 2017

Elvia Carrillo Puerto was a Mexican woman who had been married by the age of 13 and became a widow by the age of 21.  She was a socialist politician and feminist activist that founded Mexico’s first feminist groups in 1912.

Occupation: Activist, mother

Age: Died at 86 (1881-1967)

Place of birth: Motul^! Yucatán, Mexico

José Clemente Orozco

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: November 23, 2017

José Clemente Orozco was a Mexican painter whose mural work inspired a generation and kicked of a Mexican Mural Renaissance. Orozco was the most complex of the Mexican muralists, fond of the theme of human suffering, but less rea …more

Occupation: Painter

Age: Died at 66 (1883-1949)

Place of birth: Ciudad Guzmán, Jalisco, Mexico

Rachel de Queiroz

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: November 17, 2017

Rachel de Queiroz was a Brazilian journalist and writer whose book O Quinze was made into a film in 2004..

Occupation: Journalist, Writer

Age: Died at 93 (1910-2003)

Place of birth: Fortaleza, Brazil

Nellie Campobello

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: November 7, 2017

Nellie Francisca Ernestina Campobello Luna was  born María Francisca Moya Luna, and was a Mexican writer known for being a  ballet dancer.

Occupation: writer

Age: Died at 86 (1900-1986)

Place of birth: Ocampo Municipality^! Durango, Villa Ocampo^! Durango, Mexico

Selena

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: October 17, 2017

Selena Quintanilla-Pérez was an American singer and fashion designer who gained international iconism and was called the Queen of Tejano music.

Occupation: Actor, Singer

Age: Died at 24 (1971-1995)

Place of birth: Texas, USA, Lake Jackson

Violeta Parra

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: October 4, 2017

Violeta del Carmen Parra Sandoval was a Chilean songwriter and folklorist who revitalized Chilean folk music.

Occupation: Songwriter, Folklorist, Composer, Singer, Ethnomusicologist, + more

Age: Died at 50 (1917-1967)

Place of birth: San Carlos, Chile

Dr. Atl

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: October 3, 2017

Gerardo Murillo Cornado was a Mexican painter and writer born in Pihuamo who gained attention for his book “How a Volcano is Born and Grows – Paricutín”.

Occupation: artist

Age: Died at 89 (1875-1964)

Place of birth: Guadalajara, Mexico

Gloria E. Anzaldúa

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: September 26, 2017

Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa was a queer, feminist and Chicana cultural theory scholar. Her best-known book  Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza raised awareness of Chicana issues.

Occupation: Poet, Scholar, Author, Writer

Age: Died at 62 (1942-2004)

Place of birth: Rio Grande Valley

Cora Coralina

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: August 20, 2017

Cora Coralina was a Brazilian writer and poet considered to be one of the most important Brazliian writers of the world.

Occupation: Writer

Age: Died at 96 (1889-1985)

Place of birth: DVD Region 4, Goiás, South America, Brazil

Dolores del Río

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: August 3, 2017

Dolores del Río was a Mexican actress who became a Hollywood star in the 1920s and 1930s.

Occupation: Actor, Dancer

Age: Died at 78 (1905-1983)

Place of birth: Durango, Mexico

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: June 21, 2017

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, also known as Machado de Assis, Machado and Bruxo do Cosme Velho, was a Brazilian writer and advocate of monarchism.

Occupation: Poet, Literary critic, Novelist, Writer, Playwright

Age: Died at 69 (1839-1908)

Place of birth: DVD Region 4, Rio de Janeiro, South America, Brazil, Rio de Janeiro

Cecilia Grierson

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: November 22, 2016

Cecilia Grierson was an Argentine Freethinker and doctor. She was the first woman to receive a Medical Degree in Argentina.

Age: Died at 75 (1859-1934)

Place of birth: Buenos Aires, Argentina

Édgar Negret

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: October 11, 2016

Edgar Negret was a modern Latin American abstract sculptor.

Occupation: artist

Age: Died at 92 (1920-2012)

Place of birth: Popayán, Colombia

El Santo

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: September 23, 2016

Rodolfo Guzmán Huerta,, AKA  El Santo, was a Mexican Luchador enmascarado actor and icon. El Santo, along with Blue Demon and Mil Máscaras.

Occupation: Actor

Age: Died at 67 (1917-1984)

Place of birth: Tulancingo, Mexico

Yma Súmac

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: September 13, 2016

Yma Sumac was a Peruvian soprano who became one f the most famous proponents of exotica music in the 1950s.

Occupation: Singer

Age: Died at 86 (1922-2008)

Place of birth: Cajamarca, Peru

Juan Manuel Fangio

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: Jun 24, 2016

Juan Manuel Fangio, nicknamed El Chueco or El Maestro, was a race car driver from Argentina.

Occupation: Race car driver

Age: Died at 84 (1911-1995)

Place of birth: Balcarce, Argentina

Dercy Gonçalves

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: Jun 23, 2016

Dercy Gonçalves, stage name of Dolores Gonçalves Costa, was a Brazilian comedienne and television personality.

Occupation: Actor

Age: Died at 101 (1907-2008)

Place of birth: Brazil, Santa Maria Madalena, Rio de Janeiro

Rosario Castellanos

Feature date: May 25, 2016

Rosario Castellanos Figueroa was a Mexican poet and author who became one of Mexico’s most important literary voices in the last century.

Occupation: Poet, Author, Writer

Age: Died at 49 (1925-1974)

Place of birth: Mexico City, Mexico

Cazuza

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: April 4, 2016

Agenor Miranda Araújo Neto was a Brazilian composer and singer from Rio de Janeiro.

Occupation: Film Score Composer, Songwriter, Actor, Singer

Age: Died at 32 (1958-1990)

Place of birth: Brazil, Rio de Janeiro

José Alfredo Jiménez

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: January 19, 2016

José Alfredo Jiménez was a Mexican rancheras singer-songwriter whose songs became an integral component of Mexico’s musical heritage.

Occupation: Singer-songwriter

Age: Died at 47 (1926-1973)

Place of birth: Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico

Chico Mendes

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: December 15, 2015

Francisco Alves Mendes Filho, or known as Chico Mendes, was a Brazilian environmentalist and union leader.

Occupation: Environmentalist

Age: Died at 44 (1944-1988)

Place of birth: Xapuri, Brazil

Olga Cossettini

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: August 18, 2015

Olga Cossettini was an educator and teacher who became Guggenheim Fellow in Social Sciences in 1941.

Occupation:  scientist

Age: Died at 89 (1898-1987)

Place of birth: Santa Fe Province, Argentina

Zuzu Angel

CREDIT: Google.com

Feature date: June 5, 2015

Zuleika Angel Jones was a Brazilian-American fashion designer who after the disappearance of her son became active and vocal oppositionist to the  Brazilian military dictatorship.

Occupation: designer, activist

Age: Died at 55 (1921-1976)

Place of birth: Curvelo, Brazil


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The World Can’t Get Enough Of J Balvin, He Is YouTube’s Most Streamed Artist Worldwide

Entertainment

The World Can’t Get Enough Of J Balvin, He Is YouTube’s Most Streamed Artist Worldwide

Roger Kisby / Fotógrafo autónomo / Getty Images

¡Mi gente! Your faves could never. Latin music domination continues around the world with the top spots of global streaming platforms being stacked with Latinx artists. What a time to be alive. Remember when we all had to pretend Drake was Dominican to get some kind of representation out here? But when you think about the sheer number of people on the planet that speak Spanish, it totally makes sense that Latinx artists would have such a massive reach. 

And let’s be real, while fluency helps, you really don’t have to be proficient to enjoy reggaeton. The energetic, pulsating beats can compel anyone to move. Do you really think everyone in the United States knew the English translation of Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee’s “Despacito” in order to enjoy it? Music transcends language and so does Colombian trap artist J Balvin apparently. Do you think anyone even noticed that the lyrics in “Harlem Shake” are largely in Spanish? Nope. 

J Balvin is here to stay.

For six consecutive weeks, J Balvin has chopped the global charts on YouTube. That’s a total of 1.26 billion views on the platform. 

“Artista más visto en YouTube Global,” Balvin wrote in an Instagram caption.

This comes as no surprise to Balvin fans. In 2018, Balvin ousted drake as the most-streamed artist worldwide on Spotify. The singer surpassed 48 million monthly listeners last summer thanks to his single “X” with Nicky Jam which streamed over 327 million times. Balvin is in great company on the global charts with Daddy Yankee, Bad Bunny, and Ozuna all in the top 10. The trio’s single “China” with Anuel AA and Karol G is currently number 1 on the YouTube global charts and number 2 in the United States chart. However, we’re pleased to note that “Señorita” by Camilla Cabello and Shawn Mendes is topping the charts in the states. 

Balvin shouts out his Latinx fans. 

“Artista más escuchado en el mundo en @spotify posición #1 que celebro con todos mis latinos y los soñadores. Gracias Gracias Gracias,” Balvin wrote in the caption. 

Our boy is famous basically everywhere?

The top countries streaming Balvin’s music are Mexico with 240 million views, Argentina with 121 million views, and Colombia with 121 million views. The United States is in fourth place with 112 million views, followed by Spain, Peru, Chile, Ecuador, Brazil, and Venezuela. But fear not, Balvin has fans in at least 100 different countries according to YouTube. 

We stan a humble king of the masses!

Like, literally could you imagine how this level of adoration and attention would completely warp your mind? I would be a monster. I would build a house out of fan mail and then set it ablaze just to laugh at my stupid fans. I’d have so many, who cares! Meanwhile, the artist, who typically regales his followers with personal messages on Instagram every morning at 5 a.m., knows how to connect with his fans. Balvin even served ordinary people from a coffee cart in New York City the other day. 

“Buenos días , buenos días , buenos días !!!!! ARCOÍRIS TOUR empieza 30 de Agosto en Puerto Rico !! Choliseo,” he wrote on Instagram. 

 We stan a humble king of the masses!

This isn’t the first Latin wave (and it won’t be the last).

In the 1990s, the late and great Selena catapulted Tejano and Cumbia music into the mainstream American consciousness. This ushered in the era of the “Latin Explosion” where legends were born. Ricky Martin, Thalía, Marc Anthony, Enrique Iglesias, and Jennifer Lopez made their marks. Hell, even Frank Sinatra personally invited Luis Miguel to record a duet of “Come Fly With Me” on his 1994 album Duets II. 

In the 2000s, there was the “Latin Pop Boom” that saw the likes of Shakira, Paulina Rubio, and Christina Aguilera topping the charts. You may even remember non-Latinx artists trying to ride the wave with Beyoncé collaborating with Shakira on the duet, “Beautiful Liar,” and releasing a Spanish language version of the single “Irreplaceable.” It almost feels odd to call these decades different waves or eras when it is pretty clear Latinxs have been consistently rocking the charts since Gloria Estefan in the 1980s. Since then, in the United States, we have been blessed with many more Latinx acts including the likes of Selena Gomez, Demi Lovato, Camila Cabello, Becky G, and Cardi B. And of course, there are all the amazing imports from Latinx countries around the world. If we want to continue this Latinx chart domination, I only have one piece of advice: stream “China” by J. Balvin on YouTube and Spotify!

Detained Teenagers’ Artwork, Dubbed ‘Uncaged Art’ On Display In University Of Texas At El Paso

Things That Matter

Detained Teenagers’ Artwork, Dubbed ‘Uncaged Art’ On Display In University Of Texas At El Paso

UTEP

Between June 2018 and January 2019, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services detained more than 6,000 teenagers from Central and South America in a tent city 40 miles south of El Paso. It was called the Tornillo Children’s Detention camp and was the largest detention center for children in the United States. While detained there, the teenagers, aged 13-17, were asked to participate in a social studies project to create art that reminded them of their home. Their art was on display around the tent city until a story by The New York Times shined a light on the teens’ paltry living conditions, and the government shut the facility down in January 2019.

As Tornillo Children’s Detention Camp was being shut down, workers trashed nearly all of the 400 pieces of art. However, one priest and several community organizations came together and were able to save 29 of the pieces.

Father Rafael Garcia, a Jesuit Priest, was one of the few outside visitors allowed into the camp.

Credit: Sacred Heart Church, El Paso, TX / Facebook

“It is hard to describe the mood there; some kids were very glum and sad, others had no expression,” Father Garcia told NBC News. “Then there were others interacting like normal kids.” The artwork was on display until January 2019, when the U.S. government decided to close the camp. As officers were tossing the artwork, Garcia asked for permission to redistribute the art to others who may want it.

“If I hadn’t been there, and received permission to keep some of the pieces, it probably would have all been thrown in the dumpster,” Garcia said.

With the artwork in hand, Garcia called Yolanda Chávez Leyva, Ph.D., University of El Paso Texas Professor and co-founder of El Paso’s Museo Urbano.

Credit: Borderzine Reporting across fronteras / YouTube

Leyva would go to the Tornillo Children’s Detention Center on her days off to visit with the kids. Garcia knew that she co-founded El Paso’s community museum known for preserving borderland history. Garcia wanted the museum and the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) to protect the artwork. They did one better and put all the art on display at UTEP’s Centennial Museum. 

Father Garcia sees the final outcome–an exhibit featuring their work–as “a ray of light from a grim experience.”

Credit: UTEP

The Museum website describes the exhibit as reflective of “the resiliency, talent, and creativity of young men and women who trekked 2,000 miles from their homes in Central America to reach the United States.” The exhibit, titled ‘Uncaged Art,’ “provides us with a window into the personal world of migrant children whose visions and voices have often been left out of mainstream media accounts,” reads the website.

Still, the art is on display behind a chain-link fence, to remind visitors of the conditions the young artists were in at the time.

Credit: Borderzine Reporting across fronteras / YouTube

The social studies teachers allowed the students four days to create the art and allowed them to create individually or in groups. There were no other instructions other than to think of their home. Those instructions resulted in an array of mixed media art including dresses, sculptures and hundreds of drawings and sketches. Then, “camp officials” judged the art and selected their perceived best works to display around the camp.

Human rights attorney, Camilo Pérez-Bustillo thinks that the camp released the artwork as a PR stunt to look good.

Credit: UTEP

Pérez-Bustillo had interviewed about 30 children from the camp and believes the artwork was essentially curated by the facility. “I think they released it to look good,” Pérez-Bustillo told The Texas Observer. “They had so much negative publicity at the end from the national media, especially after news reports that their employees did not have to submit to FBI checks, they decided to shut it down and cut their losses.”  

For now, we don’t know the faces behind the artwork.

Credit: UTEP

In June 2018, Beto O’Rourke led hundreds of protesters to the tent city demanding humane conditions for the ever-expanding tent city. Temperatures were over 100 degrees while the children were living in tents. A DHS spokesperson told the public that the tents were air-conditioned. Some of the children told an attorney that the worst part of the facility was never knowing when they’d get out. Some kids would keep track of the days that passed by scribbling numbers on their forearms.

Still, the government’s response to the problem was to loosen the strict requirements for sponsorships. All of the children are now sponsored by people around the country.

Wherever they are, we hope that they see their artwork is cherished by our community.

Credit: “tornillo art” Digital Image. Texas Observer. 23 August 2019.

We know that the symbol of the quetzal bird created in this artwork is a symbol of freedom for Guatemala. In the words of one of the artists, as told by The Texas Observer, “The quetzal cannot be caged or it will die of sadness.”

READ: Texas Detention Officer Charged With Sexual Assault Of An Undocumented Mother’s Child

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