Entertainment

Check Out 25 Facts About ‘Coco’ That You Probably Didn’t Notice In The Movie

If you’re a fan of the Disney movie “Coco” you know that the entire film is packed with a whole heck of a lot of culture, history, and Latino pride!

But did you know these 25 facts from behind the movie?

1. The trivia behind the movie will make you cry more than the movie.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

For instance: this bit of insight from the film’s co-director and screenwriter Adrian Molina, revealed that the idea behind Miguel watching the films of Ernesto de la Cruz on videotapes to learn how to play the guitar was inspired by Molina’s own experiences as a child. During his childhood in the 1990s, Molina would record the episodes of The Wonderful World of Disney television program on ABC, CBS, and The Disney Channel on videotape. The episodes made him long for a better life.

2. The title got a name change in Brazil.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

In Portuguese “cocô” means “poop.” When the word is without the accent, “coco” it refers to the coconut fruit. To avoid confusion, creators changed the name to “Viva.”

3. The movie was too touching to be banned in China.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Coco” has quite a few themes and bits of content that are typically banned in China. However, reports say that Chinese censor board members were so touched by the movie they made an exception and let it run.

4. This film opened in Mexico first.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Three and a half weeks before its U.S. opening, “Coco” opened first. The film surpassed “The Avengers” as the country’s highest-grossing film.

5. There’s a bit of history to that Frida appearance.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

In the movie, Frida Kahlo’s spirit calls Dante “Yolo”. In real life, Frida and her husband helped to save the Xoloitzcuintli dog breed by inserting it into their art. It didn’t take long for the breed to gain popularity around the world.

6. THE CHANCLA!

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

The Chancla isn’t necessarily a universal language, but it’s pretty familiar to many belonging to the Latino community. In the movie, Miguel’s grandmother and great-great-grandmother often take off their shoe and hit people with it. We’re betting it was one of the tensest moments for kids watching in the film.

7. The orange flower holds a lot of traditional meaning.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Throughout the film, an orange flower is seen. The flower is actually the Aztec marigold, today it’s called the Mexican marigold or the Cempasúchil. In the movie, similar to IRL, the flower is used in the tradition of Dia de Muertos to guide the deceased back to the living.

8. It’s based in reality.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

The Land of the Dead in the movie is inspired by the Mexican city of Guanajuato. The city is known for having colorful houses that sit on the hillsides

9. Easter eggs!

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

At the beginning of the movie when Miguel is walking down the streets there’s a ton of Easter eggs. Watchers can spot piñatas of Pixar’s most beloved characters including Buzz Lightyear, Woody, and Mr. Ray.

10. Speaking of Easter eggs…

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

One of Pixar’s biggest and most recognizable Easter eggs also makes an appearance in the movie. In  The Land of the Dead the door to the office is labeled with “A113.” It’s a nod to the California Institute of Arts classroom where many Disney and Pixar animators studied.

11. The movie mourns old technology.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Pay attention and you’ll see that in the Land of The Dead there’s quite a bit of out-dated technology use. Keep an eye out for an 80s Macintosh computer and walkie-talkie radios. It’s actually pretty fitting considering these bits of technology are, as of today, obsolete and well dead.

12. More time and effort went into this project than any other Pixar film.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Coco” was in production between 2011 and 2017. The film set a Pixar record for being a Pixar animated film with the longest production schedule.

13. The animations hit the right notes

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Musicians beware. This one pays close attention to detail. Check out the scenes where the guitars are played, you’ll find that the character’s fingers match up to the actual chords.

14. Gael García Bernal worked double time.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Gael García Bernal is the only actor amongst the main cast to voice his character in both the film’s English and Spanish versions. All this despite the fact he isn’t the only Latino actor in the film.

Read: Here Are 25 Pieces Of ‘Coco’ Fan Art That Will Make You Want To Watch The Movie

15. The film got #1.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

The film spent more days as #1 spot at the box office than any other animated film in the 21st century.

16. “Coco” is a Pixar last.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

“Coco” will be Disney’s last original full- length animated film of the 2010s. The upcoming films to come out before 2020 are all sequels. We’re looking at you Incredibles 2 (2018), Ralph Breaks the Internet: Wreck-It Ralph 2 (2018), Toy Story 4 (2019) and Frozen 2 (2019). Now if you were one of the characters from “Coco,” who would you be? Take this quiz to find out.

17. There’s a little bit of brown face.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Womp womp. Guess risking Pixar’s long considered “good-luck charm” was a little too much for this studio to handle. In “Coco” John Ratzenberger plays a ghost named Juan Ortodoncia.

Read: 20 Gifts For The ‘Coco’ Fan In Your Family

18. Abuelita’s neck had some problems.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

The movie’s creators have said that one of the most difficult parts of the film to animate was Abuelita’s neck. To do her neck justice, the filmmakers flew out one of the animator’s mothers-in-law from Mexico and did their best to make her angry to see how Abuelita’s neck would move when she got upset. It took some time but eventually, the movie got its material.

19. The Spanish dub was dropped.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Disney typically does a Spanish and Mexican dub for its films. This time though they only did the Mexican one.

20. The movie made money moves.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

In just five days, the movie grossed over $15o million worldwide.

21. Incredibles 2 makes an appearance.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

In the scene where Miguel and Héctor arrive in Ernesto de la Cruz Plaza, there is a scene of people lighting fireworks. On the right side of the screen in this scene, there is a poster for Pixar’s Incredibles 2.

22. It outpaced Cars 3

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

The film grossed more money worldwide in 19 days than Pixars “Cars 3”

23. The movie has a lot in common with “The Blues Brothers.”

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Number one being that the film isn’t technically a musical. It’s more so a film where a lot of music takes place, a music film if you will.

24. There’s also a “The Nightmare Before Christmas” tribute.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

When Miguel puts on makeup to blend into the Spirit World, he like the other skeletons were made to slightly resemble Jack Skellington.

25. It’s the second time Benjamin Bratt acted as a bad boy.

“Coco” / Walt Disney Pictures /
Pixar Animation Studios

Benjamin Bratt played a villain in an animated film for the first time in Despicable Me 2. This was his second film.


Read: Hospital Officials At This Oregon Hospital Just Changed Their Policy To Help Undocumented Patients

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Netflix’s ‘Gentefied’ Renewed For Season 2, Fans Overjoyed

Entertainment

Netflix’s ‘Gentefied’ Renewed For Season 2, Fans Overjoyed

gentefied / Instagram

Any and all news is welcomed right now and Netflix came through this week. “Gentefied” is coming back for a second season and this is absolutely not a drill. Soon we will be back in Boyle Heights with Ana, Chris, Erik, and the rest of the cast we have come to love so much.

Netflix has confirmed “Gentefied” for a second season.

The show is a fan favorite for Netflix with praise and love pouring in for the groundbreaking show. “Gentefied” is set in Boyle Heights and it is all about the fight against gentrification. The show premiered this year to big fanfare and excitement from Latino Netflix users. The show, created by Marvin Lemus and Linda Yvette Chávez, was picked up for an eight-episode run of the 30-minute show.

The show is one of the most relevant portrayals of the Latino experience in the 21st century.

The show highlights the plight of gentrification on communities across the U.S. Boyle Heights in Los Angeles has been the center of growing tension as the neighborhood slowly gentrifies. Rising rents have forced some residents and businesses to close and leave because of the changing demographic in the neighborhood.

Hearts are full as everyone celebrates the news of a whole new season.

The show originally premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival as a digital series. Lemus and Chávez debuted the show and it was an instant hit with festival-goers. After three years of waiting, the show was released by Netflix and became a national hit. The show has shone a light on the cost of gentrification for more Americans than knew about it before the show aired.

Low key, it has made for perfect binge-watching during this quarantine.

There isn’t a whole lot any of us can do at the moment. Most of us are at home because of self-isolation and social distancing guidelines designed to save lives during the pandemic. Might as well us some of your time to watch and support and very important moment in our community. This kind of representation is something that Latinos have been asking for.

While excited, some fans want more, like a cross-over with Starz’s “Vida.”

Now, just to be clear, we are not concerned with what it takes to make this happen. Netflix and Starz can come up with the actual plan. We are just going to be here waiting to be heard so we can all have the kind of cross-over the world deserves. Just imagine a chance for those two shows to collide in Latino excellence.

Now we wait for an air date.

We are patient. We will be here when you are ready. All you have to do is let us know when to tune in and you know we are coming through.

READ: I Watched ‘Gentefied’ On Netflix And These Are My Brutally Honest Thoughts

Latino Bookstore In North Carolina Faces Very Uncertain Future Just 6 Months After Opening

Things That Matter

Latino Bookstore In North Carolina Faces Very Uncertain Future Just 6 Months After Opening

epiloguebooksch / Instagram

Epilogue Books Chocolate Brews is a relatively new bookstore in Chapel Hill, North Carolina that is facing a very uncertain future. The Latino-owned bookstore opened its doors to the Chapel Hill community six months ago and now COVID-19 is putting their future at risk.

Epilogue Books Chocolate Brews is a Latino-owned bookstore in North Carolina that is fighting to survive COVID-19.

Epilogue Books Chocolate Brews came from a need that the owners saw in downtown Chapel Hill. A bookshop had recently closed in the area so Jamie and Miranda Sanchez knew that it was time for them to help fill that sudden loss.

“We felt like there was a big hole in downtown,” Jaime told The Daily Tar Heel. “A bookshop creates this whole sense of community for the town so we decided to go forward and try to open our own bookstore.”

The bookstore was serving a community that needed a place to gather and discuss ideas after a former bookstore closed its doors.

“The core of our idea began years ago as the union of Jaime’s heritage and Miranda’s passion for writing and the transportive nature of reading. Wanderers and wonderers, our idea continued to grow in the plazuelas of Mexico and the chocolaterías of Spain, in the plazas of every country where such spaces form quasi-families for both the briefest of moments and the longest stretches of time,” reads the bookstore’s website. “In these spaces, people share everything from decadent chocolate to fried street food, to myth-like tales, to the memories of our own childhood selves chasing pigeons and sucking the sticky droplets from paletas off our hands.”

While the bookstore was well received by the community, the COVID-19 pandemic had other plans.

COVID-19 has swept through the U.S. and the number of cases continues to climb. While New York might be seeing fewer cases, the rest of the U.S. is in an uptick. The virus has forced businesses across the country to close or retool to be online only. That is what Epilogue Books Chocolate Brews did to make sure they can weather the storm.

The owners of the bookstore realized they needed to retool their business strategy when students stopped coming back from Spring Break.

“We started adjusting our plans in early March to accommodate for the new lack of traffic,” Jaime told NBC News. “Students weren’t coming back from spring break, so we had originally thought the locals would come out like they did during winter break to take advantage of the lack of downtown traffic, but that obviously didn’t happen because of coronavirus, so we started getting ready to adjust and pivot online for when we’d no longer be able to sustain brick and mortar operations.”

The Sanchezes are keeping their literary dream alive through the pandemic.

“Jaime’s always wanted to open a business and bring a piece of home to it,” Miranda, who is originally from Tijuana, told NBC News. “We felt that continuing that tradition of having a bookstore in the area would be a good mesh, not just of who we are as people but how we want to engage with our community. A community that works to sustain an independent bookshop has certain values.”

Independent bookstores are one of the hardest-hit businesses since readings and events in the spaces have been canceled.

Bookshop started to help struggling independent bookstores weather the storm. COVID-19 has left millions of people without jobs and businesses are having to close permanently because of the virus. Bookshop is giving independent bookstores a chance to survive the closures and social distancing.

Bookstores serve a vital role in communities. They give people a place to gather and share ideas. The easy access to literature can change the lives of children in underprivileged communities but allowing them to see themselves reflected in new lights. They also serve as a place to explore the world around you by flipping open a book cover.

If you have time on your hands and enjoy reading, check out Bookshop and build up that 2020 reading list.

READ: Celebrities Are Reading Children’s Books To Help Parents And Children Cope With COVID-19