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24 Children’s Books You Should Read To Your Child Now

There is nothing more personal and endearing than parents reading to their children. It is portrayed in every family movie as the time of day when the family comes together in loving silence as one person takes the family on an imaginative ride. If you are trying to figure out which books you should read to your children, look no further. Here are 24 books that you can read to your children as they grow up. They just so happen to be Latino storylines because some stories transcend all things and connect us as people.

1. “Return to Sender” by Julia Alvarez

CREDIT: Return To Sender. Amazon. Digital Image. April 4, 2018.

Julia Alvarez’s book “Return to Sender” is as relevant now as it was when she wrote it in 2010. The story is about a farming family from Vermont who’s father gets hurt. In order to save the farm they have to hire Mexican migrant workers to keep things running. The rest shows what happens when two worlds collide and the differences  connect all of us.

2. “Round Is a Tortilla” by Roseanne Greenfield Thong

CREDIT: Round Is A Tortilla. Amazon. Digital Image. April 4, 2018.

This is for the little one more than anyone since the main focus is learning shapes. Of course they learn the circle shape from the tortilla but they also learn the rectangle shape from the ice cream cart and the triangles of a quesadilla.

3. “ish” by Peter H. Reynolds

CREDIT: Ish. Amazon. Digital Image. April 4, 2018.

Every parent wants their child to reach for the moon and be as creative and successful as possible. What better way to harness that kind of energy than by telling them the story of Ramon in “ish.” Ramon is a child who just loves to draw anywhere and anytime. However, he gets a critique from a brother and is instantly trying to do things just right. But, thankfully, his sister reminds him of the wild wonder that once dominated his work and he is able to continue exploring his own style.

4. “The Dreamer” by Pam Muñoz Ryan and Peter Sís

CREDIT: The Dreamer. Amazon. Digital Image. April 4, 2018.

If you want to give your child a look into what imagination can become, this is the book. The authors of the book take the reader on a journey through Chilean rainforests and wilderness following an entrancing voice and calling. This is the early life of poet Pablo Neruda and how it shaped him to become one of the most critically acclaimed poets in the world.

5. “Who Was Cesar Chavez?” by Dana Meachen Rau

CREDIT: Who Was Cesar Chavez?. Amazon. Digital Image. April 4, 2018.

Who was he? If you want to give your children a little bit of history with their evening stories, this is the book for you. Cesar Chavez fought tirelessly for the rights of farmworkers in California and eventually the nation. It is a piece of history that lingers today through his partner in the revolution, Dolores Huerta.

6. “Esperanza Rising” by Pam Muñoz Ryan

CREDIT: Esperanza Rising. Amazon. Digital Image. April 4, 2018.

This book is all about rising above your difficulties to strive for a better future. Esperanza is a young girl in Mexico during the Great Depression and she and her mother flee north to California. Gone are the days of sitting idly while others works. Esperanza is left fighting for survival next to her mother and her character is forever shaped by these experiences.

7. “Baseball in April and Other Stories” by Gary Soto

CREDIT: Baseball In April / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

A dose of Americana, Gary Soto shows what life was like for a Mexican-American kid growing up in the central valley in California. Get ready for a lot of knock-off Barbies, Little League tryouts and a Spanish glossary to help those who don’t speak Spanish.

8. “Islandborn” by Junot Díaz

CREDIT: IslandBorn / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

Follow Lola as she tries to recall the country where her family immigrated from. It is her classes’ assignment but she was so young that she has to ask her family to figure it out. Before you know it, she is knee deep in beautiful memories and ideas of the island that they left behind.

9. “Too Many Tamales” by Gary Soto and Ed Martinez

CREDIT: Too Many Tamales / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

This classic has left Latino children anxious during the holidays. During the wild blur that is making tamales, Maria accidentally loses her mother’s ring and the only place they can think to look are in the tamales. This is one of the most comedic and heartwarming books on the shelves.

10. “Abuela” by Arthur Dorros

CREDIT: Abuela / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

This book is just one long and exciting journey over New York City as Rosalba and her abuela fly over the city. You get to see and hear the city through her abuela’s eyes and ears and it is just magical.

11. “Who Was Roberto Clemente?” By James Buckley Jr.

CREDIT: Who Was Roberto Clemente / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

Roberto Clemente is one of the most influential names in baseball. The Puerto Rican raised player who was the youngest of seven children excelled in the sport. In his career, he won numerous awards and was the first Latin American player inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

12. “La Princesa and the Pea” by Susan Middleton Elya

CREDIT: La Princesa And The Pea / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

If you are thinking that this is the same thing as “The Princess and the Pea” then you are right. However, this version is full with cultural moments that give the classic story and very Latino twist.

13. “Frida Kahlo and Her Animalitos” by Monica Brown

CREDIT: Frida Kahlo And Her Animalitos / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

We all know Frida Kahlo and her amazing work, but what about her companions outside of Diego Rivera? This books shines some light on the animals that Kahlo kept close to her to keep her happy and creative. If you love animals, check it out.

14. “Niño Wrestles the World” by Yuyi Morales

CREDIT: Niño Wrestles The World / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

The title and artwork kind of lay out what you can expect from this story. Niño is one of the bravest wrestlers he can think of and the book is all about his journey to become the best wrestler in the world.

15. “Yes! We Are Latinos” by Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy

CREDIT: Yes! We Are Latinos / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

This book will give all Latinos the representation they have never had. The author explores the lives of Latinos living across the country and the difference in our vast community. Some of us have Asian heritage in our blood and some have strong ties back to Africa. But in the end, we are all also Latino and connected.

16. “Coco: The Junior Novelization” by Disney/Pixar

CREDIT: Coco / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

“Coco” is here in book version for your little one to love and admire. Seriously, it is literally the same story with grand pictures to once again capture your little one’s heart.

17. “My Name Is Maria Isabel” by Alma Flor Ada

CREDIT: My Name Is Maria Isabel / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

Have you ever been the second person in a room or team with the same name? That is Maria Isabel’s issue when she get to a new class. Since there is already on Maria, the teacher suggests they call her Mary but she doesn’t like that. It is important to her to be called Maria because her name is special in her family. What can she do about it?

18. “Tito Puente: Mambo King” by Monica Brown

CREDIT: Tito Puente / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

Music is one of the greatest forms of art in existence and no one knew that better than Tito Puente who grew up banging pots and pans until he found his skill as a musician. This book will give your little one the inspiration to follow their dreams.

19. “Gazpacho for Nacho” by Tracey Kyle

CREDIT: Gazpacho For Nacho / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

Everyone goes through a phase when they only want to eat one specific dish. For Nacho it is gazpacho. Seriously. Breakfast, lunch and dinner for this kid is only the cold, yet delicious soup.

20. “Julián Is A Mermaid” by Jessica Love

CREDIT: Julián Is A Mermaid / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

Who hasn’t wanted to rebel against society and be who they truly are? Julián is that kid when he sees women in amazing dresses that inspire him to create his own outfit imitating mermaids.

21. “Windows” by Julia Denos

CREDIT: Windows / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

This book is filled with a wonder we have all known: windows in the neighborhood. Julia Denos takes the readers for a journey through a neighborhood walk when the sun sets and windows start to light up and you get quick glimpses into your neighbors lives.

22. Sonia Sotomayor: A Judge Grows In the Bronx” by Jonah Winter

CREDIT: Sonia Sotomayor / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

Sonia Sotomayor was the first Latino appointed to the highest court int he nation and she wasn’t raised with privilege. This book tells the story of the Latina justice and her upbringing in the Bronx that led her to pursue a career in justice.

23. “Besos for Baby” by Jen Arena

CREDIT: Besos For Baby / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

This book will teach you the basics of Spanish with the different people and animals that give the baby little besos.

24. “Crossing the Wire” by Will Hobbs

CREDIT: Crossing The Wire / Amazon / Digital Image / April 4, 2018

For the more mature child, this book gives you a glimpse into the circumstance that lead some people to make the decision to head north. It is more relevant now than ever considering our political environment.

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A 13-Year-Old Boy Was Shot Point-Blank, Unprovoked In His Front Yard; His Family Demands Answers From Police

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A 13-Year-Old Boy Was Shot Point-Blank, Unprovoked In His Front Yard; His Family Demands Answers From Police

Brayan Zavala/Photo: GOFUNDME

A family in Riverdale of Clayton County, Georgia is expressing frustration at the lack of progress the police have made in finding the killer of 13-year-old son Brayan Zavala. “We want justice,” said Brayan’s 16-year-old brother, Jesus. “We want to find whoever killed my brother so he can go to jail and pay for what he did.”

According to the deceased boy’s family, last Thursday, Brayan had been working on the front lawn with his brother and father when a masked gunman approached the property. The gunman didn’t answer when Brayan’s father asked him what he wanted. Instead, unprovoked, the stranger took out his shotgun and shot Brayan at point-blank range in the face. Stunned, the family tried to fight for Brayan’s life as the gunman fled the scene.

“The shooter didn’t even say I want your money, or this is a robbery or I’m assaulting you. He just came, stood there (in) silence and shot my brother.” his 16-year-old brother, Jesus, explained to the Atlanta Journal Constitution. “We tried to stop all the blood but by the time the police got here, it didn’t seem like he had life or a chance to live.”

The children of Mexican immigrants, the death is especially tragic. “We decided to live here for a better life, turns out it is worse,” Jesus told local news station Fox 5. “This is just like Mexico. They kill because they wanna kill. That is what just happens.”

According to Jesus, Brayan was a A-student on the honor roll, always trying to stay out of trouble. “Me, my brother, my sister, we study and then do our chores, and study. We’re just focused on doing the things, you know, productivity. And going somewhere,” said Jesus told local news station Fox 5.

“He was a cheerful kid. Always smiling, joking. Like I said, always avoiding problems instead of causing problems. I don’t know why this happened to him.”

The senseless killing has shaken the community who don’t understand what would provoke an inexplicable murder of a child. Law enforcement, as well, can’t make sense of it.

“As a Clayton County police officer for over 38 years very little shocks me. But, this brutal, senseless murder has overwhelmed me,” a Clayton County Police officer named Doug Jewett wrote to the AJC. “I send my prayers to the family.”

As of now, the family is trying to pick up the pieces of their life, setting up a GoFundMe page to finance Brayan’s funeral costs. The Clayton County police department has asked anyone with information to call (770) 477-4479. As of now, no suspects have been reported or arrested, and the family is calling for justice.

“It’s been a week now since my brother died and I haven’t heard anything, no answers from police,” Jesus told Atlanta 11 Alive news. “It makes me feel really frustrated that they don’t think it’s a big deal. I mean, they killed my little brother.”

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Four Mexican Children Have Been Nominated For The Children’s Peace Prize And Here’s Why They Each Deserve To Win

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Four Mexican Children Have Been Nominated For The Children’s Peace Prize And Here’s Why They Each Deserve To Win

Yasin Yagci / Getty Images

Mexico is celebrating four compassionate children who have each been nominated for a prestigious international award, for their dedication to solving issues within their own communities.

Three kids from Oaxaca and one from Sinaloa have been nominated for the International Children’s Peace Award – which is award to children from around the world who have made an effort to promote the rights of children and improve the situation of vulnerable minors.

Each of Mexico’s four nominees have done so much for their communities – and the world at large – that it’s going to be a close contest to decide who is the ultimate winner.

Four kids from Mexico are in the running for a prestigious international peace award.

Among 138 children from 42 countries, four Mexican kids have been nominated for the International Children’s Peace Award, which is awarded to minors who have made an effort to promote the rights of children and improve the situation of vulnerable minors.

The award comes with a €100,000 (about $117,000 USD) prize which can be used to invest in the solutions they’ve been championing. In fact, one of last year’s winners was climate change activist Greta Thunberg and peace advocate Divina Maloum from Cameroon.

On this occasion, Mexico’s nominees are counting on the win and include three nominees from Oaxaca and one from the state of Sinaloa.

Each of the children nominated have done incredible work to help solve issues in their communities.

In order to be nominated for the award and to be considered for the top prize, children must demonstrate their commitment to making a “special effort to promote children’s rights and better the situation of vulnerable children,” according to the Children’s Peace Prize website.

It goes without saying that each of Mexico’s four nominees have already checked off each of those requirements, with each of them making major advancements in issues that affect their communities, their country, and children from around the world.

In fact, the issues this group of children have been taking on range from combatting bullying and domestic violence, to increasing access to education, protecting young women and girls from endemic violence, and combatting the global Covid-19 pandemic.

One nominee from Oaxaca founded her own foundation to help advance the issues she cares about.

In an interview with Milenio, Georgina Martínez, 17, said that the award represents a great opportunity.

“This year we are among the 142 nominees from 42 different countries and I believe that without a doubt there is a commitment from all of us as Mexican children and young people to win it to continue fighting for our dreams,” she said.

Martínez, who won the national youth award in 2017, has been working for the rights of children and young people for 10 years through various campaigns, such as “Boys and Girls to the Rescue”, which focused on helping vulnerable minors combat bullying and domestic violence. She also supported the Nutrikids campaign that fed minors in precarious situations, worked to build classrooms in impoverished communities, and has also been a speaker at various conferences.

“My activism began when I was 9 years old, when I participated in the ninth parliament of the girls and boys of Mexico, where I was a children’s legislator. We spent a week at the Chamber of Deputies to work in favor of children’s rights. There I realized that my voice could be heard and that I could be the voice of many children who perhaps did not have access to many of their rights such as education and health,” she told Milenio.

Young Georgina Martínez is in her last year of high school, and she has in mind to continue working in the present and the future to continue being a person and agent of change.

Martínez’s brother is also in the running for his work against the Covid-19 pandemic.

Jorge Martínez, the 13-year-old brother of Georgina, considers it a great honor to represent Oaxaca in the contest.

“I was nominated for my masks project, which consists of using 3D printing to print universal headbands and make acrylic masks, which I donate to hospitals,” he told Milenio.

“I started by making 100 masks, which I financed with my savings, and donated them to the children’s hospital to help hospitalized children so that they wouldn’t be infected with Covid-19. The project went viral allowing me to grow the project and it soon gained international attention,” he added.

Many of his neighbors and friends consider him to be an actual genius but he’s far too modest to take on that title. He said that “the truth is, all this technology is something that I like a lot and it’s fun to be able to work in fields that you enjoy.”

Martínez also shared his plans for the future, telling Milenio that he’d love to move to China to be able to work in robotics and engineering.

Oaxaca also has a third nominee in the global contest.

Oaxaca’s third nominee for the prize is a young ballet dancer, activist, and storyteller – Aleida Ruiz Sosa – who is a defender of women’s rights. She’s currently studying online as she finishes high school and plans to pursue a law degree, in addition to advancing her dance career.

She’s been a longstanding voice for women.

“Since I was very young I have worked hard to help my community. I have a collection of stories called “Rainbow”, that speaks out about violence against women. In fact, I worked with the Attorney General of Oaxaca, and the main thing is that all the proceeds from the sale of these stories will go to the young victims of femicide,” she told Milenio.

Also nominated is 16-year-old Enrique Ángel Figueroa Salazar of Mazatlán, who is passionate about children’s rights and wishes to change local, federal and global societies so that children can live a life free of violence.

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