Entertainment

21 Facts About Riverdale More Shocking Than the Season Finale

Don’t worry, this is a spoiler free zone…if you’ve caught up through Season 3 of The CW’s Riverdale, all streaming on Netflix! From Veronica’s kiss with Betty, to her stealthily getting in on her parents’ plans for Riverdale, this show is full of on-screen surprises.

There’s so much more that goes on behind the scenes.

1. This is Camila Mendes’s (Veronica) first onscreen role.

CREDIT: @camimendes / Instagram

She was hired the moment she graduated from NYU’s Tisch School for Performing Arts. That’s what you call Latina excellence.

2. And the role is perfect for her. Her words (and mine).

CREDIT: @camimendes / Instagram

She told Glamour Magazine, “This role came along, and it was the perfect fit,” Mendes said. “Everything about it—I had her on the surface of who I am. [I also liked] the fact that she was Latina, and they weren’t trying to push any stereotype on her. She just was Latina, which is how I feel.”

3. Camila Mendes knew Cole Sprouse (Jughead) from school.

CREDIT: @camimendes / Instagram

But Sprouse’s Zac & Cody child star status made him a bit elusive. He admitted that he doesn’t remember her. Open your eyes, maybe?

4. Cole Sprouse is the oldest of the bunch, at 25 years old.

CREDIT: @thecwriverdale / Instagram

Then comes in our bae, Camila Mendes, at 23, Lili Reinhart (Betty) at 21, and KJ Apa (Archie) at just 20 years old.

5. And the whole gang is tight IRL.

CREDIT: @camimendes / Instagram

Caption: “Domino’s Resort 2017 Collection.” The actresses who play Charlotte and Betty actually live together IRL.

6. The whole show is based off Archie’s Double Digest comic book magazines.

CREDIT: @EstateSalesOrg / Twitter

So glad I saved all 100 of them from my childhood. Literally this is what childhood dreams are made of.

7.  Camila Mendes knows the Latino-American struggle.

CREDIT: @CamilaMendes / Twitter

She tells People Magazine, “I’m a full-blooded Brazilian, with an entire extended family of Brazilians, but I was born and raised in the U.S. When I go to Brazil, I feel like an American, and in the U.S., I always notice the traits that make me Brazilian.”

8. Though she grew up in Charlottesville, Virginia.

CREDIT: @camimendes / Instagram

She was there until she was 10 years old, when they moved to Brazil for a year, and then spent the rest of her upbringing in Miami. #305pride

9. Each episode title is named after a movie…

CREDIT: Eve Productions

Which is supposed to offer some insight into what happens. Classic Riverdale hiding things in plain sight. The writers select the title after they’ve written the episode

10. And all the sweeping town shots are the same used for Stars Hollow in Gilmore Girls and Rosewood in Pretty Little Liars.

CREDIT: @netflixuk / Twitter

The real home base? Lord Byng Secondary School in Vancouver, Canada. Prepare to be disturbed for this next one.

11. KJ Apa is actually a brunette.

CREDIT: “KJ Apa.” Digital Image. PopBuzz. 15 May 2018.

When they bleached his eyebrows to dye them red, they actually burned holes through his skin. #JobRisks

12. Marisol Nichols (Hermione Lodge) played a role on Charmed.

And did she rock that leather outfit or what? She also had a role on Friends as one of Joey’s costars. The drama is real folks.

13. Both Veronica’s on-screen parents are half-Mexican off screen.

CREDIT: @lgbtmndes / Twitter

Her mom, Maria, is from Texas, but she moved to Chicago, which is where Nichols was born. She never met her dad but she thinks he’s Ashkenazi Jewish.

14. Camila says she used Gossip Girl’s Blair Waldorf as inspo for Veronica.

CREDIT: @brunettespeakin / Twitter

In this show, Latinos are the destination, and we’re here for it.

15. The show itself uses Twin Peaks as its inspiration, according to showrunner Roberto Aguirre Sacasa.

CREDIT: @camilamendes / Twitter

Instead of following the detective after a teen’s death, the show follows people death affects most–the people left behind.

16. You can listen to a few songs by Archie and Josie and the Pussycats on Spotify.

CREDIT: Spotify

Truthfully, they’re not too shabby. Very teen drama and filled with the angst of youth.

17. Sabrina the Teenage Witch lives on the other side of Sweetwater River… AKA Greendale.

CREDIT: @yvrshoots / Twitter

I want to know what else is brewing over there, but the spin-off is happening gusy. I’m trying very hard not to spoil anything for you laggers.

18. In the original comic books, Veronica’s dad is hella old.

CREDIT: Archie Comic Publications Inc.

And he didn’t commit any white collar crimes (that we know of.) We’re so happy they decided to ditch that archaic narrative and go with a Latino-cast family instead.

19. Mark Consuelos (Hiram Lodge), is half Mexican and half Italian.

CREDIT: @am_Chach / Twitter

And much dreamier and suited for a beaut like Hermione. Yes, there are problems with his character on the show, but the greed comes from his OG comic book character.

20. The actor has his own secrets though…

CREDIT: @cosmopolitan / Twitter

He eloped to Vegas with his on-screen love interest, Kelly Ripa, from All My Children. Their on-screen romance landed them a “Hottest Romance” award at the Soap Opera Awards.

21. The women are everything.

CW's Riverdale
CREDIT: @camilamendes / Twitter

This is no secret, but women in every healthy Latino household rule the house. Veronica and Hermione are no exception, no matter what you see happening on the surface.

If you don’t know what I’m talking about, do yourself a favor and binge away!

Jharrel Jerome Made History By Being The First Ever Afro-Latino To Win An Emmy For Acting And His Acceptance Speech Made Latinos Everywhere Cry Their Hearts Out

Entertainment

Jharrel Jerome Made History By Being The First Ever Afro-Latino To Win An Emmy For Acting And His Acceptance Speech Made Latinos Everywhere Cry Their Hearts Out

Jharrel Jerome - 71st Emmy Awards - Press Room / Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Another glass ceiling has finally been broken in Hollywood. On Sunday night, Dominican-American actor Jharrel Jerome became the first-ever Afro-Latino actor to win an Emmy for acting. Jerome won the award for his work in the Ava Duverney limited series “When They See Us”, where he portrayed the wrongly-convicted Korey Wise. 

“When They See Us” is a Netflix-helmed production that revolves around the case of Raymond Santana, Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, Korey Wise, and Yusef Salaam–a group of black and Latino young men who were wrongly convicted for the rape and assault of a female jogger. Jerome played the part of Korey Wise, the oldest of the group, and the only member who was forced to serve his term in the adult prison system. Years later, the true assailant admitted to the crime and the men were released from prison. 

The limited-series has been praised for “adding a necessary layer of humanity” to the boys’ stories and challenging viewers to “reconsider what it means to find justice in America.”

The win was one of the most emotional wins of the night, with the audience erupting into applause and getting to its feet when Jerome won.

Notably among the audience were the members of “The Central Park Five”, whom Jerome referred to in his speech as “The Exonerated Five”. The men gave Jerome a standing ovation along with the rest of the crowd, all of them visibly emotional. Korey Wise, the man Jerome portrayed, was shown with tears running down his face during Jerome’s acceptance speech.

Jerome started the speech saying that he feels he should be “in the Bronx right now, chillin,’ waiting for my mom’s cooking, but I’m here”. He then went on to thank his family for their support, including his mother and his father. He lapsed into Spanish at one point, pointing to the sky and telling his deceased grandfather “te quiero”. Finally, he dedicated his award “Most importantly, this is for the men that we know as The Exonerated Five. Thank you so much. It’s an honor and a blessing.”

The win was a shock to audience and critics alike, as the category was stacked with heavy-hitters.

The competition was stiff among the limited-series nominees, with household names like Benecio Del Toro, Hugh Grant, Mahershala Ali, and Jared Harris among the actors. Jerome thanked his fellow nominees at the beginning of his speech, saying that he was “here with his inspirations” with people he was “so motivated by”. The win was not only surprising because of Jerome’s status as a newcomer, but also his age–the youngest actor ever to win in this category. 

The significance of the occasion was not lost on Jerome, who said that he hoped it was a “step forward for Dominicans, for Latinos, for Afro-Latinos” in a backstage interview.

Backstage, Jerome was also candid about the impact of black and brown stories, and how their power lies in the truth they portray. “I think our strongest stories are the stories of pain, considering that’s what we go through on a regular basis,” he said. “I think the truth is our pain needs to be told.”

Always on board to celebrate the accomplishments of la Raza, Latinxs took to Twitter to express their joy at Jerome’s win. 

Naturally, the news is cause for celebration. After all, it’s not every day that a young Dominican Afro-Latino from the Bronx wins an Emmy. Especially when he’s pitted against Oscar-winners and industry favorites.

This Latina took to Twitter to emphasize the significance of this event:

With Jerome’s win, history was literally made on Sunday night–that fact can’t be stated enough.

Even Lin Manuel Miranda got in on the action, expressing his pride:

It turns out that Miranda and Jerome had met before. What a beautiful example of Latinos supporting other Latinos!

This Latino was overcome with all of the emotion he was feeling from Jerome’s win.

It’s hard to express the pride one feels when seeing someone from their tribe make an impact on the world. This is why representation on our screens is so important.

This Dominicana had a thing or two to say about black and Latinx intersectionality:

Jerome’s win is the perfect teachable moment for people (included Latinxs) who struggle with the fact that there are black Latinos out there. 

This Latina suggested a nation-wide day off for Dominican-Americans.

We don’t hate that idea. Every step forward should be celebrated. 

Congratulations to Jharrel Jerome for a much-deserved win. We’re sure that we’ll be seeing him on our screens for years to come.

Camila Mendes Shared That She Was Sexually Assaulted And Spoke About The Tattoo That Has Helped Her Heal

Entertainment

Camila Mendes Shared That She Was Sexually Assaulted And Spoke About The Tattoo That Has Helped Her Heal

@camimendes / Instagram

Camila Mendes recently revealed she is a sexual assault survivor. The 25-year-old “Riverdale” star opened up about her assault while attending college in the October issue of Women’s Health. Mendes, who covers the issue, has been an outspoken advocate of women’s issues. The Latin American actress has previously talked about her experience with disordered eating and body image issues. 

Unfortunately, Mendes isn’t the only “Riverdale” cast member who has dealt with abusive behavior. In 2017, Mendes’ co-star Lili Reinhart revealed that when she was a teenager when a man in a position of power attempted to force himself on her. At the time, Reinhart chose to remain silent in fear of retribution, losing her livelihood and ruining her reputation in Hollywood. 

While the #MeToo movement has unearthed dozens of accusations of abuses of power in Hollywood, for most women these abuses of power are commonplace at work, home, and school. 

According to RAINN, in the United States, about 23.1% of undergraduate females experience rape or sexual assault, while 5.4% of undergraduate males experience rape or sexual assault. Moreover, 11.2% of all college students experience rape or sexual assault. Consider that in 2017, there were roughly 19 million people enrolled in colleges in the United States— these numbers are alarming and illuminate the prevalence of sexual assault on campus. 

Camila Mendes covers Women’s Health

“This cover means so much to me. it took me a while to view self-confidence as a product of physical & mental health, instead of appearance and thinness. I’m grateful for the opportunity to spread that message; I could have used it way earlier in my life,” Mendes wrote on Instagram.  

Camila Mendes tells her story. 

While attending New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, Mendes was slipped the common date rape drug colloquially known as a “roofie.” 

“I got the tattoo after my freshman year,” she says, of a tattoo above her rib that reads: to build a home. “I had a very, very bad experience; I was roofied by someone who sexually assaulted me.”

Mendes vowed from then on to only allow things that made her feel safe and comfortable into her life. She didn’t reveal much more about the experience, but she doesn’t have to. That’s the entire principle behind the #MeToo movement founded by Tarana Burke. All you have to do is say “me too” to a survivor, and it is the revelation, not the personal details, that provides comfort. 

“On one side, it’s a bold, declarative statement that, ‘I’m not ashamed,’ and ‘I’m not alone,'” Burke said. “On the other side, it’s a statement from survivor to survivor that says, ‘I see you, I hear you, I understand you and I’m here for you or I get it.'”

Sexual assault can be isolating and lonely, yet we are surrounded by survivors every day. 

On body positivity:

View this post on Instagram

link in bio ♥️

A post shared by camila mendes (@camimendes) on

In 2018, the Brazilian American actress opened up about her struggles with disordered eating and bulimia. 

“They feel like watching somebody else who has gone through it gives them hope that they can recover on their own and come to terms with their own problems,” Mendes said of the warm reception she received in sharing her struggles. 

“It’s something that’s still a curse to me. It’s not like that ever goes away. Whenever I do feel insecure, I go back to health. What can I do that’s healthy? Health is what’s important, not appearance. That mentality is what takes me out of the insecure, anxious thoughts.”

Latinxs and sexual assault:

View this post on Instagram

women supporting women

A post shared by camila mendes (@camimendes) on

According to the 2004 National Crime Victimization Survey, 1 in 6 Latinx females ages 13 and older are victims of sexual assault. 

The Office For Victims of Crime revealed that Latinx girls are more likely to stop attending school activities to avoid sexual harassment than other girls, that Latinx married women were less likely to identify forced sexual acts by their spouses as assault, and that 77 percent of Latinx women, surveyed by a 2009 Southern Poverty Law Center study, claimed sexual harassment was an issue at their workplace. 

And finally that, “For the increasing numbers of women who make the journey across the Mexico-U.S. border, rape has become so prevalent that many women take birth control pills or get shots before setting out to ensure that they won’t get pregnant.” 

When sexual assault survivors become more visible, no one can deny the collective trauma. Sexual violence affects men and women all over their world, it is only when survivors speak their truth that actionable change can happen. Yet, survivors are so often revictimized when they share their stories. Kudos to Mendes for sharing hers.