Entertainment

Here Are Some Hikers Of Color Who Will Inspire You To Travel The World And Explore Nature

Fact: public lands are public. They’re paid for by our tax dollars and every single one of us deserves to enjoy its beauty. Research shows that being in nature increases creativity and productivity. So often, it’s relegated to those with enough resources to have a car, gas to spare to get out of town and into the mountains, and the gear to stay safe and comfortable. As more and more brown people explore the outdoors, we’re coming up with ways to represent the little victories with hashtags like #LatinosOutdoors #MelaninBasecamp and more.

If you’re thinking about getting outside more often, whether that’s for a casual hike, a multi-day backpacking trip or giving outdoor climbing a shot, we have some brown adventurers to inspire you to just get out there.

Cristina Martinez / @xicananaturenerd

CREDIT: @xicananaturenerd / Instagram

Cristina is the park ranger we need. Read on…

Caption: “In the past 169 days, I have felt a vast range of emotions. From anxiety and stress to excitement and gratefulness, from sadness and frustration to elation and hope. This experience has sure been one of extremes and where opposites attract.

From dealing with microaggressions regarding my ethnic background and visitors questioning the urgency of climate change to hearing glaciers calve and seeing animals that are in peoples bucket list’s, it sure has been an intense experience in many ways. There have been tears for the northern lights but also tears after visitors’ ignorant comments about “Mexicans.” And through those moments of frustration and anger, I also remember the times I have smiled at seeing bear cubs learn how to swim from their mom and at the visitors who have come up to me and said “I am happy to see a ranger that looks like me.” I know I won’t be able to truly capture what the past 5.5 months have been for me when I tell family and friends back home of my time here. And it is okay if some just don’t understand- it doesn’t devalue how life changing this place has been for me. I will miss being surrounded by glaciers, forests, wildlife, and the friends I have made here. I love you Sít’ Eeti Gheiyí, I hope to see you next summer”

Yani Sanchez / @yaniquadrada

CREDIT: @yaniquadrada / Instagram

Yani’s got an aesthetic unlike any other. This super talented photographer will traverse anywhere to capture nature in all its beauty.

Vanessa Vancouver / @vvancour

CREDIT: @vvancour / Instagram

She’s Liberian-Mexican and her heart is always full of outdoor adventures con su familia y her fellow outdoor die-hards. She makes a gorgeous ofrenda también.

Manny / @manny_outdoors

CREDIT: @manny_outdoors / Instagram

When you’re born and raised in San Diego and move to Seattle, you spend your free time comparing your feet to bear tracks. Wait till you see the camera look up.

Chingona Flores / @mexxxica111

CREDIT: @mexxxica111 / Instagram

She’s done it all. She’s hiked Mount Whitney, Six Pack of Peaks, ran the Malibu Olympic Triathalon. Watch this Latina take up space in the alpines, desert peaks, and inspire you in two languages.

Oscar Malo / @malofx

CREDIT: @malofx / Instagram

There is nothing malo about the feed @malofx serves. His outdoor adventures are intermixed with stunning professional photography of ballerinas on the Golden Gate bridge y más.

Karen Ramos / @naturechola

CREDIT: @naturechola / Instagram

She’s the founder of the Get Out, Stay Out non-profit that gets indigenous-migrant children outside via camping trips and backpacking adventures. Her feed will inspire the wildest adventurers who care about justice.

EAG / @waitingforgodoy

CREDIT: @waitingforgodoy / Instagram

Who uses their real name when you have a trail name like “Eag”? @waitingforgodboy is based out of Denver and has all the sights at high heights without your fright.

Sarah Elizabeth Valencia / @sarahsheroams

CREDIT: @sarahsheroams / Instagram

Have you ever hiked to the top of a mountain? Try bringing camera equipment. Thankfully, @sarahsheroams did that for you and you can just take it in.

@lizzblissss

CREDIT: @lizzblissss / Instagram

If there’s anyone you’re going to follow, put @lizzblissss in your top three. She’s your numero uno mujer. Prepare to be dazzled by the Montana mountains, the red rocks of Utah, and the glacier lakes of Washington.

Kane Hernandez / @kanehernandez

CREDIT: @kanehernandez / Instagram

Trail Name: “Flamin’ Hot”

Mexicano Kane hiked the Pacific Crest Trail last year, from Mexico hasta Canada and his travel pics are incredible.

Julian Hernandez / @julian__hernandez

CREDIT: @julian__hernandez / Instagram

He takes all his photos with an iPhone 6s and he’s here to abolish ICE. And take photos of his happy, happy dog in the snow.

Gaby McKenzie / @gabymckenzie

CREDIT: @gabymckenzie / Instagram

Caption: “Being a Belizean American, I grew up seeing many different landscapes, all of them beautiful to me. When I spent my summers in Belize, I would experience jungle terrain and breathtaking waterfalls, as well as relaxing tropical islands and crystal waters. Now that I am older, I am starting to inquire and appreciate the American outdoors that were once unfamiliar to me.”

Gabriela & Marcela / @broketexans

CREDIT: @broketexans / Instagram

They’re “dos amigas sin dinero trying to travel the US & the world one trip at a time” and they’re the most relatable.

Caption: “Time to sit down and enjoy the view! I’m probably also telling Marcy how much my legs hurt.”

Amanda Jameson / @browngirlonthenst

CREDIT: @browngirlonthenst / Instagram

Trail Name: “Zuul”

She’s thru-hiked the PCT and the CT and is counting the miles. Note: she’s at 3300 miles hikes to date.

@biancam_j

CREDIT: @biancam_j / Instagram

Bianca will show you the wonders of Belize. Caption: “Dare to try something new like cave tubing. Cave tubing in Belize ????????, we hiked for about 30 minutes to reach the river and then floated on tubes on the river for about 7 miles underground through dark limestone caves with headlamps.”

Brittany Leavitt / @bleavitt8

CREDIT: @bleavitt8 / Instagram

She’s an @OutdoorAfro leader, REI instructor, and outdoor climber. Watch this *super* inspiring melanin beauty literally climb mountains and get out there yourself.

Gabriela Lopez / @gabriela_llopez

CREDIT: @gabriela_llopez / Instagram

She’s as big in the vegan LA Instagram world as she is for POC on the trail. Her captions will make you want to travel your inner world as much as the Great Outdoors.

@judiezabaneh

CREDIT: @judiezabaneh / Instagram

Watch her hike Devil’s ridge in Sedona, crow pose on rocks overlooking roaring rivers in Belize. She’s got the wanderlust and we get to bear witness a todo.

@atlas_wayfarer

CREDIT: @atlas_wayfarer / Instagram

If you want to see stunning photos of couples on glaciers and in the northern lights, follow @atlas_wayfarer.

Caption: “When I backpacked 250 miles along the final stretches of the Continental Divide Trail gave me a whole new perspective on life, being attuned to Mother Nature.”

Follow accounts like @takingupspaceoutdoors

CREDIT: @takingupspaceoutdoors / Instagram

The account’s self described mission is this: “The goal is to inspire equity, inclusion, representation and diversity in all outdoor activities! The outdoors belong to ALL! ”


READ: 11 Music Festivals In Latin America You Need To Go To At Least Once

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Cardi B Just Created An Instagram Account For Kulture And It’s The Cutest Thing Ever

Entertainment

Cardi B Just Created An Instagram Account For Kulture And It’s The Cutest Thing Ever

There’s a new influencer in town and her name is Kulture Kiari. 

On Saturday, Cardi B posted a photo of 2-year-old Kulture to her Instagram page, writing: “Follow @KultureKiari new IG…So much cool cute baby stuff coming up.”

The Instagram page Cardi was linking to was a brand new page dedicated to the chart-topping rapper’s daughter, Kulture.

via kulturekiari/Instagram

So far, the page has only thirteen photos posted, but has already racked up over 700,000 followers–and counting. 

A few of the pictures show Kulture in peak-cute form, wearing an adorable plaid skirt and pink cardigan. She also has a big white bow fixed on top of her head. 

The rest of the photos range from Kulture swimming in a pool to experimenting with Snapchat filters. All of the pictures have captions written in first-person, like “I look like mommy here” and “My mom was annoying me but it’s ok cause I look cute.”

The Instagram account even has some #TBT photos of when culture was a baby–one notably cute one where she’s trying mashed potatoes for the first time. 

via iamcardib/Instagram

Naturally, Cardi’s fans are eating up all the extra Kulture content, writing comments like “Kulture is looking all cute” and “She is so freaking beautiful”.

Commenters couldn’t help but exclaim over Kulture’s fashionable outfits, accessories and hairstyles. 

In the past, Cardi has defended her decision to dress Kulture in expensive designer clothing, saying that her child is in the public eye and deserves to be dressed as well as she is.

“If I’m fly and Daddy’s fly, then so is the kid. If I’m wearing Cha-nay-nay, my kid’s having the same, you know what I’m saying,” she said on Instagram. “Because if I was looking like a bad b**ch, expensive b**ch and I have my kid looking like a bum bum, then y’all would be talking s**t.”

via Vogue/Instagram

Kulture’s new Instagram page comes just days after Cardi B filed for divorce from husband of three years, Offset.

While she has largely stayed mum on the topic, she recently broke her silence via Instagram, explaining the reason behind the divorce. Cardi said she was simply “tired of the arguments” and that her and Offset “grew apart”. She also added that she “hasn’t shed one tear” over the dissolution of her marriage.

Interestingly enough, Offset has previously been candid about his desire for Kulture to stay out of the public eye and lead a relatively normal life. “I want my kids to be kids. I don’t like them having Instagram, I don’t want to move to LA, so there won’t be cameras in their face,” he told The Breakfast Club in 2019. “I keep my kids in public school, I don’t want my kid to be spoiled.”

Cardi, it looks like, has other plans.

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‘Vintage Latinas’ Is Hyping Up WOC Entertainers Often Forgotten By Media

Fierce

‘Vintage Latinas’ Is Hyping Up WOC Entertainers Often Forgotten By Media

Amid a life-threatening pandemic, political upheaval and a dawning economic crisis, the future can feel frighteningly uncertain. We’ve all been coping in our own ways: from practicing meditation to trying out new recipes to starting creative projects. For me, joy has come in the form of history. Learning about women, particularly Latinas, who entertained audiences on the silver screen or at cabarets, fought for their countries and communities, and created beauty and fashion trends has brought me bliss at a time when I couldn’t even imagine happiness as a possibility. Realizing how healing the stories of our foremothers have been for me, I decided to create Vintage Latinas, an Instagram account dedicated to the Latina and Latin American women and femmes of yesterday.

Through the online community, I post daily photos and videos of women from the 1900s up until the early 2000s. I accompany each image with a lengthy caption that either introduces followers to former stars they’ve never heard of or shares little-known facts and stories about popular icons. Highlighting women and femmes across Latin America, the Spanish Caribbean and the U.S., the page is sprinkled with popular faces like Celia Cruz, Rita Moreno, Frida Kahlo and Bianca Jagger as well as radiant figures who aren’t as celebrated in popular media today like María Montez, Rosa Luna, Maribel Arrieta and Ajita Wilson. My goal is to commemorate the beauty, style, talent, brilliance and power of these women. To do so, I spotlight everyone from actresses, singers, dancers, models and showgirls to artists, designers, beauty queens, party czars, activists and trendsetters. 

It’s not surprising to me that at a time when I have limited control over the unpredictable future I decided to turn my attention to the past. A lover of history, I often find refuge in the narratives of people from yesterday who fought against powerful people, systems and countries to create change for their communities. This was no different. After losing my job in March and being locked up in quarantine for the months that followed, my mental and spiritual health took hard blows. While addressing the issues I was experiencing and developing a wellness routine, I decided to delve into literature about Julia de Burgos, Lolita Lebrón, Blanca Canales, Iris Morales and Denise Oliver-Velez — some of the Puerto Rican nationalists and revolutionaries I hold dear to my heart.

But unlike my experiences in the past, while rereading these works I began imagining the periods in which these women lived — the early- and mid-twentieth century — outside the political and social battles they were fighting.

Immediately, I found myself researching artists and actresses my heroines might have listened to and admired, expanding my interest in these eras beyond struggle and protests.

Soon, guarachas and boleros from artists like Myrta Silva, Carmen Delia Dipini, Lucecita Benitez and Toña la Negra were booming from my speakers more than my favorite reggaetoneros. I was spending my weekends happy that I was forced to stay home because that gave me the chance to search and watch Old Hollywood classics. Obsessed with the makeup and style of the women I was watching, I started repurposing the clothes in my closet to look like outfits inspired by some of my ‘60s and ‘70s fashion inspirations, like Lola Falana, Raquel Welch and Tina Aumont.

I was balancing news of a scary future with the stories and aesthetics of erstwhile powerful Latinas who resisted, lived and loved during similarly turbulent times.

When I started Vintage Latinas a month ago, I simply wanted to create a space where I could honor all the women who were positively influencing my life. For me, it was a hobby, something fun and joyful to do between freelance writing gigs and trying to land a full-time job amid a pandemic. But within days, the page grew into something more. Very quickly, people began following Vintage Latinas, commenting on the posts and sharing the content with their audiences. They even encouraged others to follow the page and called it their favorite account on Instagram. I knew that the dynamic personalities and enduring influence of these sensational women were as healing — or at least as captivating — to others as they were to me. By week one, the page went from a personal hobby to a creative project and online community where people from all over the world are remembering and discovering our Latina and Latin American heroines. 

As I embark on Vintage Latinas’ second month, I have several exciting plans I will begin executing. In addition to my daily posts about historic stars, I’ll be utilizing original and user-generated content to create a browsing experience I hope will excite followers. I’ll be creating activities, like trivia-style quizzes, polls and “Finish the Lyrics” games, featuring vintage images of the everyday matriarchs of the community and conducting interviews through Instagram Live with historians and modern-day Latinas who dress in vintage and pinup, among several other undertakings.

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Puerto Rican singer and politician Ruth Fernández is considered one of the most powerful women and barrier-breakers in Puerto Rican history. Born in Ponce, Puerto Rico in 1919, Fernández began singing publicly as a teenager, performing at age 14 on local radio stations for 50 cents a day. Heard by Mingo, a famous bandleader, she was invited to join the group in 1940, becoming the first woman to sing in a Puerto Rican orchestra. Performing in nightclubs, dances and casinos, Fernández became a star on the archipelago. However, celebrity didn't save her from experiencing anti-blackness. In 1944 when her band was contracted to perform at the Condado Vanderbilt Hotel for a benefit concert for the American Red Cross, she was told she had to enter the building through the kitchen door because of the color of her skin. But on the day of the show, Fernández ignored the racist protocol and entered through the main entrance. When asked years later about that night, she responded: "Me llamaron negra. ¿Negra? ¿Y qué?" From then on, she began referring to herself as "La Negra de Ponce." In 1972, Fernández was elected to Puerto Rico's Senate, representing the district of Ponce as a member of the Partido Popular Democrático de Puerto Rico until 1980. As a legislator, she sought reforms and better working conditions for artists and also considered the needs of Puerto Ricans living in the contiguous U.S. In her honor, a tenement in the Bronx — the Ruth Fernández Apartments — is named after her. Fernández has received awards from several countries in Latin America, while many cities in the U.S. — including Washington, D.C., New York and Los Angeles — have official "Ruth Fernández Days." She passed away in 2012 of a septic shock and pneumonia at the age of 92. Here she performs "Soy la que soy" in the 1960s. #ruthfernandez #puertorican #1960s #latinasdeayer #vintagelatina #vintage #vintagestyle #vintagefashion #vintagebeauty #retrostyle #blackbeauty #blackvintage

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The stories of our foremothers, who thrived or continued luchando despite racist systems, colonialism and state-instituted violence, are inspiring and must be preserved. Through Vintage Latinas, I aim to ensure their vibrant lives and contributions to culture and social justice aren’t forgotten. Instead, I want our barrier-breaking predecessors to be celebrated, and I hope you’ll join me in this digital rave that is equal parts history, culture, glam and community. 

Follow Vintage Latinas on Instagram.

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