Entertainment

20 Crazy Facts About “Spy Kids” You Didn’t Notice In The Movie

In 2001, Latino kids across the globe were met with a rare treasure never to be seen. A Latino spy family featuring two kids with top secret espionage badges on the big screen. The heroic movie “Spy Kids” launched a mega movie franchise as well as the imaginations of Latino kids.

Written and directed by Robert Rodriguez, “Spy Kids” was an epic espionage movie  packed full of wonderment, surprise, gadgets oh yeah and Antonio Banderas, Carla Gugino and new faces Alexa PenaVega and Daryl Sabara.

Check out these 20 hings you never knew about your favorite movie from 2001!

1. Robert Rodriguez, the director, used ideas from his childhood for his characters.

CREDIT: Dimension Films

Rodriguez had drawn a picture of men with thumbs for heads, arms, and legs as a child. The thumb people made an appearance as the clumsy robots known as the Thums Thumbs.

2. Rodriguez’s family made appearances in special ways.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


As an homage to his family members, Rodriguez named the characters of Gregorio, Carmen, and Juni after them.

3. George Clooney wore pajama pants during his appearance

CREDIT: Dimension Films


Robert Rodriguez was the director behind the movie and had worked with Clooney before. He showed up as a one-man crew and shot the Clooney scene himself. The scene was shot from the waist up since Clooney was still wearing his pijama.

4. Selena Gomez made her debut in the franchise.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


The “Wolves” singer made her film debut as “Waterpark Girl” In the 3rd movie.

5. Gregorio Cortez was named after a thief.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


In real life, Gregorio Cortez is the name of a famous Texan thief from the early 90s.

6. IRL, Carla Gugino was too young to be an adult mom to her kids in the movie.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


In reality, Gugino is only  17 years older than Alexa PenaVega, who plays her oldest child Carmen.

7. Carla almost didn’t accept the role because of her age.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


At 29 years old during the time of filming, Carla felt she was too young to have kids that were 10 and 12 years old. But Rodriguez convinced her by sharing that his own mother had had him and all of his siblings by the time she was thirty. 

8. Production was super speedy.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


The movie was shot over a period of 10 weeks.

9. It held box office for almost as long.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


The movie stayed at number 1 for three straight whole weeks in the United States bod office charts.

10. Carla Gugino wasn’t even supposed to be here.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


Kelly Preston had been offered the role of Ingrid Cortez, but when she gave birth, Carla was offered the role. 

11. Which means the movie didn’t dodge blackface.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


Kelly Preston is white and Carla Gugino is Italian AKA not Latina.

12. Angie Harmon almost got the role of Ingrid.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


Harmon is also not Latina. She’s Greek and German/Irish. Makes you think someone was determined to cast a white mother eh? Like where was Salma Hayek?? OR, a Brown casting director?

13. The kids helped pick Gugino as Ingrid.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


Rodriguez wanted to make sure the mother looked like the kids and Gugino’s dye job.

14. That’s not San Diablo.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


In the notorious arriel shot that’s not San Diablo it’s a view of Santiago de Chile! 

15. Rodriguez edited the movie in a “garage.”

CREDIT: Dimension Films


Rodriguez’s garage is really an elaborate editing studio in his home.

16. Daryl Sabara and Alexa Vega own this film

CREDIT: Dimension Films


They’re the only actors to appear in all four films of the franchise.

17. Carmen has such a Latina tame.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


According to the credits and a scene where she uses it as a password Carmen Elizabeth Juanita Costa-Brava Cortez.

18. The location has a fun oxymoron.

CREDIT: Dimension Films


San Diablo is a Spanish oxymoron meaning Holy Devil or Sainted Devil.

19. The initials of the Organization of Super Spies is copy pasted.

CREDIT: Dimension Films

The Organization of Super Spies or O.S.S. has the exact same initials as the Office of Strategic Services,. That’s the version of the WWII-era C.I.A.

20. Rodriguez has a trademark and a thing for knives.

CREDIT: Dimension Films

Rodriguez’s film’s featuring Danny Trejo usually have his characters named after a knife. In Spy Kids he plays Isador “Machete” Cortez.


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Cinematographer Galo Olivares Talks About How He Created A World For The New ‘Gretel And Hansel’

Entertainment

Cinematographer Galo Olivares Talks About How He Created A World For The New ‘Gretel And Hansel’

Erwin Jaquez / AMC

“Gretel and Hansel” is now in theater telling a new version of a timeless Grimm’s fairy tale. We all grew up knowing the story of “Hansel and Gretel” and the lesson of being careful where you go and who you befriend in the world. Mexican cinematographer Galo Olivares helped director Osgood Perkins create a universe as creepy and tantalizing as one would expect from the classic tale.

Galo Olivares is the man behind the haunting and unsettling imagery of “Gretel and Hansel.”

For Olivares, the first thing he had to do was to make sure he found the right place to create the perfect ambiance for the film.

“The first thing that I did after I got out the plane was start scouting, and we realized Dublin, Ireland was the perfect canvas for this story,” Olivares says. “All the team did a great job. We had a great production designer and a marvelous costume designer. Sophia Lillis and Alice Krige were just wonderful so it was pretty easy to come together with all the pieces for this film.”

Olivares grew up with the creepy tales of La Llorona and the story was one that inspires his work on this film.

“I grew up hearing the legend of La Llorona. My grandmother’s house was somehow close to a cemetery and I remember we could see it from the top floor,” Olivares recalls. “We have several legends here in Mexico where we actually celebrate death. We have the day of the dead, which is a beautiful celebration that reminds us that death is part of life. So, I have always been inspired by this universe and I loved being able to bring a small part to this film.”

The biggest thing Olivares wanted to do was give the story a modern upgrade while keeping the spirit of the story intact.

“I remember one of the first things we talked about with Osgood was what he didn’t want this movie to be. Suddenly, we started to talk about Star Wars and how this tale could be timeless,” Olivares says. “That’s why there are many modern details but you cannot tell when is this happening, whether it’s the past or future or another dimension maybe. I always thought of the witch’s house as a kind of mothership.”

You can watch “Gretel and Hansel” now in theaters.

Congratulations on the movie, Galo Olivares.

READ: Here Are 20 Latino Legends From Our Childhood That Still Terrify Us As Adults Because That’s Latino Parenting

David Schwimmer, The Actor Who Played Ross In Friends, Defended The Show After Backlash Over Insensitivity And Lack Of Diversity

Entertainment

David Schwimmer, The Actor Who Played Ross In Friends, Defended The Show After Backlash Over Insensitivity And Lack Of Diversity

Warner Bros. Television Distribution

“Friends” is loved by everyone. You’d be lying if you said you’ve never spent an entire day on the sofa, binge-watching the 90s comedy. But it’s safe to say that some of the jokes, punchlines, and themes of the show wouldn’t have been very well received in 2020 —aka some of the show’s storylines have been regarded as more than a little problematic. Here are some examples. 

“Friends” originally aired in the 90s —but with Netflix reviving the craze for the show a few years ago, millennial viewers noticed a few insensitive punchlines.

The show was on air since 1994 and up until 2004. But since “Friends “started streaming on Netflix just a few years ago, modern day fans have found issues with the way the show depicts and handles some issues —like its lack of diversity for instance, or its depiction of women and LGBT people. 

Pretty much everything about “Fat Monica,” for example.

The whole ‘Fat Monica’ storyline fed into the media’s perpetuated image of overweight individuals as punchlines and nothing more. She only became a “worthy” character after she lost the weight, or at least that’s how the show made it seem.

Exhibit B. The treatment of Chandler’s trans dad.

Chandler’s homophobia and jokes about his transgender parent were awful. While the addition of a proud gay character in a show during the 90s was a huge step forward in television, they totally misrepresented the community. The show conflated transgender people and drag queens. In trying to expose and dismantle some prejudices, they also perpetuated others.

The objectification of women by the male characters

There’s a Thanksgiving episode where Ross and Joey are trying to leave so they can go and meet Joey’s good looking roommate and her dancing friends. And just like this one, there are many other episodes in which “the boys” spend the whole show trying to think up ways to trick women into sleeping with them —in this particular episode, Joey literally calls the women “objects” —and I’m triggered.

Joey’s sexism usually went unchecked—and he was downright creepy a lot of times.

Most of Joey’s scenes revolved around women —and a lot of them are problematic. Sure, he had his good and sweet moments, but it’s super problematic that he can’t remember who he’s slept with, or how he makes his roommates make breakfast for his conquest and then dump them for him. His roommate’s search was also awful: “Female, non-smoker, non-ugly.” —Seriously?

The constant examples of fragile masculinity.

The male characters frequently had to make a HUGE issue out of their fragile masculinity. Here’s an example for you: In the episode where Chandler moves in with Monica, she has him making cedar sachets with old pantyhose. Chandler asks to leave to go do “guy stuff.” He then finds Joey learning to knit and Ross applying face powder to try and minimize the contrast of his overly bleached teeth. He leaves in disgust. Later, after pointing out all the feminine touches Joey’s new female roommate has applied to the old apartment, Chandler points out that Joey is turning into a woman. “Why would you say that? That’s just mean,” asks Joey. “Now I’ve upset you? What did I say?” replies Chandler. “It’s not what you said. It’s the way you said it… Oh, my God! I’m a woman!” exclaims Joey in disgust —*ALL THE EYEROLLS*

Ross has been one of the most criticized characters.

The character of Ross has seen a lot of criticism, for his dismissal of the importance of consent, his possessiveness over women, the casual anti-gay comments and more. 

Even the show creators have admitted to feeling uncomfortable with some scenes. 

The creators spoke about their regrets at Tribeca Film Festival’s “Friends” 25th anniversary. When asked by the audience if there were storylines that they regret, Kauffman had a couple of examples ready: “the one when Phoebe starts dating her sister Ursula’s stalker, played by David Arquette (“we did a lot of rewriting on that to make it work”).” “It’s much harder for me to enjoy the good moments when there are moments in it where I’m going, ‘Oh my God, we let that happen? We did that,'” she explained.

Meanwhile, co-creator, David Crane, admitted he doesn’t remember a lot of specific scenes and jokes after working on 10 seasons 15-25 years ago, said that when he does stumble upon an episode, he’ll occasionally wonder, “Wow, really? We went with that?” “There are some that are better than others,” he said.

In a recent interview with the Guardian, “Friends” star David Schwimmer who played Ross, said he”doesn’t care” about the backlash, because he believes it comes from the show being taken out of the context of its time.

When asked about the backlash that the show went through after its Netflix renaissance, the actor said; “I don’t care.” A few articles and several Twitter threads suggested that the show’s jokes hadn’t aged well, like Chandler worrying about seeming gay, or jokes about Monica’s weight. “The truth is also that show was groundbreaking in its time for the way in which it handled so casually sex, protected sex, gay marriage, and relationships. The pilot of the show was my character’s wife left him for a woman and there was a gay wedding, of my ex and her wife, that I attended.”

“Friends” is a product of the pre-“woke” era when it comes to race, too. 

“Maybe there should be an all-black Friends or an all-Asian Friends,” Schwimmer says. “But I was well aware of the lack of diversity and I campaigned for years to have Ross date women of color. One of the first girlfriends I had on the show was an Asian American woman, and later I dated African American women. That was a very conscious push on my part.