Entertainment

18 TV Shows About Real ‘All American’ Families That Aren’t ‘Roseanne’

One Day At A TIme / Netflix

In the days since the “Roseanne” revival debuted and set records, many fans of the show that once embraced feminism and discussions of class have undoubtedly been disappointed. With a main character no longer open to diversity and change and is instead a staunch Trump supporter, many of us have felt left down.

If you’re boycotting the show but still looking to watch something about a family check out these shows that are well aware of the fact that the immigrant experience has always been a cornerstone of American culture.

1. One Day At A Time

CREDIT: Netflix / One Day At A Time

Latins have waited way too long for this Netflix original that speaks to a truly ‘all American’ experience. In this heartfelt series that examines and explores what it means to be Latino and American, Justina Machado and Rita Moreno star as a mother daughter pair raising a Cuban family. This show address nearly every topic that comes up in today’s households, particularly ones whose families are of color.

2. Jane The Virgin

CREDIT: ABC / Jane The. Virgin

Jane Villanueva is the daughter of a teen mother aspiring to be a teacher and author. The show speaks to the Latino household epxiernece with the satirical romantic comedy- telenovela take you didn’t know you needed. The show’s complex storytelling embraces Latino expereinces, feminism, politics and family values.

3. Modern Family

CREDIT: ABC / Modern Family

This mockumentary style family sticom centers around the Pritchett family a league split up into 3 different types of families that are so common in today’s America. You get the nuclear family, step- and same-sex all in one show. The Pritchet family includes Gloria Delgado Pritchett, a passionate Colombian mother who raises a son often told to hide his cultural background and shows him to embrace it.

4. Cristela

CREDIT: ABC / Cristela

Cristela was only around for one season and was canceled by ABC back in 2015, still the show is available to stream online and speaks in very real ways to the American experience. Cristela Hernandez is a Mexican-American law school graduate living in Dallas, Texas with her sister and pursuing the American Dream by taking up the job of an unpaid intern at a law firm. 

3. ¿Qué Pasa, USA?

CREDIT: ABC / ¿Qué Pasa, USA?

“¿Que Pasa, USA?” seasons have been over decades but it’s portrayal of a bilingual American family is still relevant. As the first bilingual sitcom on television, the show had an equal mix of English and Spanish in every episode (perfect for the Latino looking to learn). The show showcased a multigenerational Cuban-American family living in Miami and working to hold on to its culture while also adapting to Americna life. 4. On My Block

CREDIT: Netflix / On My Block

It’s not “Stranger Things,” or “The Wonder Years” but this Netflix series is pretty close. The show about a rough inner-city Los Angeles neighborhood exmaines the lifes of four streetsmart teens from families of all kinds of backgrounds. There’s Monse Finnie, an Afro-Latina, Ruby Martinez, a Mexican math whis, Jamal Turner a nerdy Black kid and Cesar Diaz a smart kid pressured into gang life.

5. Blackish

CREDIT: ABC / Blackish

ABC’s show about the Johnsons focuses on a Black family living in today’s America where racism is still very alive but Black people are capable of thriving. The show’s viewpoint on what is like to raise kids in a America today just works.

6. The George Lopez Show

CREDIT: ABC / George Lopez

It’s been years since one of TV’s most visible Latinos said goodbye to this show about a man raising a Latino nuclear family while suegra looms large. 7. Chico And The Man

CREDIT: NBC / Chico And The Man

Freddie Prinze stars in this 70s series with four seasons about an optimistic Chicano who turns an ignornant and hard-drinking mans opinon about Latino culture around. Now that’s a show Roseanne’s audience could stand to watch.

8. Fresh Off the Boat

CREDIT: ABC / Fresh off The Boat

ABC’ show about an Asian-American family brings in all the ’90s nostalgia, touches on hip-hop culture and the immigrant experience. The Huangs are a Taiwanese family navigating culture clashes and embracing the Ameircan dream. Their family speaks to Asian experience in way that is completely universal.

9. Ugly Betty

CREDIT: ABC / Ugly Betty

This show based  on a Colombian soap opera became a hit back in the early 2000s and no longer airs new episodes on TV but reruns are easy to come by. The show was a winner of two Golden Globes and highlighted the life of Betty Suarez a Meixcan American attempting to make it big in the print world as a writer.

10. Trollhunters

CREDIT: Netflix / Trollhunters

It’s an animated film with trolls, sure, and has little focus on Latino traditions but the show is pact full with Latino talen. Guillermo Del Toro brings you into his imagination in a show that brings a  good mix of comedy, action, and plot to the table.

11. Stuck in the Middle

CREDIT: Disney / Stuck in The Middle

“Jane the Virgin”’s Jenna Orteg stars as Harley, the middle child of a pretty big Latino famiy. The whipsmart and resourceful teen uses science to solve most of her everyday problems and achieve her goals. 

12. Nina’s World

CREDIT: Universal Kids/ Nina’s World

Families looking to fill their “Dora Explorer” kick will love this show about a young Latina attempting to connect with her Latino roots. The best part? Abuelita Yolie’s voice is performed by Puerto Rican reina Rita Moreno.

13. Elena of Avalor

CREDIT: Disney / Elena of Avalor

Disney’s first Latina princess, Elena  isn’t the kind of princess waiting arround to be rescued. She battles her own obstacles and fights for her family.

14. Gran’pa Knows Best

CREDIT: HBO / Gran’pa Knows Best

this show based ona web series airs on HBO Latino and allows William Caballero’s 86-year-old abuelo, Victor Muriel, provide the world with his own musings about the world. The show answers real question from viewers and doles out some hilarious advice. 

15. The Fosters

CREDIT: Freeform / The Fosters

This progressive blended family has been around since 2013 and follows the lives of the Foster family which is led by a lesbian couple as they raise four adopted children in San Diego.

16. East Los High

CREDIT: Hulu / East Los High

Catch this series on Hulu as it depics all of the teen drama from an American Latino experience you could ever want. Starring Danielle Vega, Gabriel Chavarria, Alicia Sixtos, and Vannessa Vasquez the show is Hulu’s longest running series.

17. The Get Down

CREDIT: Netflix / The Get Down

This Baz Luhrmann TV series is available on Netflix and focuses on the hip-hop scene of 1970s Bronx, NY. 

18. Atlanta

CREDIT: FX / Atlanta

Donald Glover’s show about two counsins helping each other rise to the top of Atlan’s music scene focuses on the lives of their families as they try to define the line between “real life and street life.”


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Neighbors Formed A Human Chain To Prevent This Man From Getting Deported And It’s The Most Beautiful Act Of Humanity I’ve Seen

Things That Matter

Neighbors Formed A Human Chain To Prevent This Man From Getting Deported And It’s The Most Beautiful Act Of Humanity I’ve Seen

DailyKos / Twitter

Although the planned Trump ICE raids didn’t happen on the scale that many were expecting, there are still many heartbreaking stories of people being rounded up, arrested, detained, and even deported. However, in some cases entire communities have come together to fight back against ICE and to protect people from illegal arrests.

Case in point: this story out of Tennessee in which vecinos, advocates, and legal activists came together to protect a father and his son from an illegal ICE raid.

A group of vecinos created a literal human chain to protect their neighbor from ICE agents.

Credit: @NBCNews / Twitter

Hermitage, Tennessee community members rushed to a neighbor’s home to protect him and his son from Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents early Monday morning, at one point forming a human chain around the van where the family had been stuck so they could safely exit into their home.

It started early Monday morning when ICE officers followed a man’s van and tried to pull it over. After the van’s driver pulled into the driveway of a house, the officers blocked him in. The man remained inside the vehicle and alerted local advocates and neighbors, the affiliates said.

ICE had come to arrest a man but the neighbors formed a chain to allow him to get into his home and then helped him drive away.

Credit: @dgordon52 / Twitter

A crowd gathered, with witnesses recording the tense scene on their cell phones and bringing supplies to the parked vehicle. Neighbors brought gasoline to keep the van running and food and water for the man and his 12-year-old son, who were holed up inside. “While there were immigrant advocate community members present, it was clear that a major thrust of the citizen response was being driven by the immediate neighbors of the man and child in the van. … It was striking to watch neighbors deliver food, water, and gasoline to help their neighbor stay in his car,” Nashville City Council Bob Mendes said in a statement describing what he watched unfold

ICE officers eventually decided to leave “to de-escalate the situation,” ICE spokesman Bryan Cox told CNN. Coxsaid he wouldn’t say “who the agency’s target or targets may have been so as to not compromise a potential future operation that would seek to arrest the individual at a different time and place.”

People were full of emotion once the story broke.

Credit: @odetteroulette / Twitter

With all the bad news in the world, many people have pretty much lost faith in ever hearing anything good again. So when the story of a group of people coming together to protect a man and his son from an ICE arrest broke, many were overwhelmed. It showed to many that even in the unlikeliest of places good people doing good things do still exist.

Like seriously, we dare you to watch this video and not at least get goosebumps.

When they form the chain so the man and his son can get to their car…omg it’s so powerful to watch a community spring into action.

Some took to Twitter to call for more of this community action.

Credit: @UnitedWeDream / Twitter

Many advocacy organizations used this story as an example of community-driven efforts to fight back against Trump’s racist immigration policies. Actions like this one protected a family from an illegal arrest. The agent’s warrant wasn’t legally sufficient to arrest the man and had it not been for the quick action of the community, ICE would of gotten away with it.

Deanna From “Queer Eye” Was Harassed By Neighbors Who Told Her “The Mexicans Are Building Their Own Wall” But The Fab Five Helped Her Overcome Giving Us Another Reason To Love Them

Entertainment

Deanna From “Queer Eye” Was Harassed By Neighbors Who Told Her “The Mexicans Are Building Their Own Wall” But The Fab Five Helped Her Overcome Giving Us Another Reason To Love Them

Netflix

Netflix’s reboot of Queer Eye, featuring the Fab Five, has become a staple of America’s collective therapy. In the days since the fourth season has dropped, we’re all feeling more in touch with our feelings, but never have we been so attacked as when we met Chicana Deanna Muñoz. 

Deanna is a proud second generation Mexican-American who struggles with being “stuck” between two cultures. She doesn’t speak Spanish and can’t cook, making her feel like she’s “not Mexican enough”, and racism felt by her white neighbors makes her feel like she’s “not white enough.” Needless to say, that experience is so relatable for most of us second-generation Latino-Americans.

Meet Deanna Muñoz in all her J.Lo glory.

Credit: @annimal26 / Twitter

In fact, we call it brujería. Deanna had her first child when she was just 16 years old, and had to drop out of school. As her daughter started pouring her heart into creative writing, she wanted to find her a tutor. With none to be found, she founded the Latino Arts Festival non-profit foundation, to showcase and cultivate Latino culture in Kansas City.

We’re giving Queer Eye a 10/10 for shining a light on cultural Imposter Syndrome within the Latinx community.

Credit: @Imitate_this / Twitter

Why did Queer Eye do such a good job of this? They created space for Deanna, an actual Chicana, to share her experience to America. So many of us have faced the surprise of both Latinos and non-Latinos alike when we answer that “what are you?” question. In a place like the U.S., where we often come from mixed-culture families, seeing the emotional effects played out on screen is validating AF.

Karamo Brown took Deanna door to door to find neighbors that can counter the racism she experienced by other vecinos.

Credit: Netflix

Deanna’s family had to build a mini wall to reinforce water drainage on their yard, and a neighbor texted her husband saying, “The Mexicans are building their own wall.” 😡

Deanna’s family immediately felt uncomfortable in their own neighborhood. Our favorite Cubano, Karamo, made sure that Deanna went where the love is–and had her create her own welcome to the ‘hood.

And sons and daughters of immigrant parents everywhere sobbed to see the sacrifice.

Credit: @iiiitsandrea / Twitter

Deanna’s parents immigrated to the U.S. to give Deanna a better life. So many of our parents or abuelos left their culture and language behind to give their children a new start in life. Seeing Deanna get that is what it’s all about. #NoWall

Meanwhile, Bobbi created a safe space for Latino artists in Kansas City by gifting Deanna an office space.

Credit: Netflix

Deanna was working out of a tiny space in her home, with the third annual Latino Arts Festival upon her. Bobbi was able to create a studio space for Latinx artists, and made sure that Latinx artists influenced the design of the space. 👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼

There was also this Latino lesson: never reject abuela’s food. She’ll bring it to you anyway.

Credit: Netflix

Twitter user Pamela Gocobachi shared, that “one of my fave moments from the new #QueerEye season was in  Deanna’s episode when @antoni learned the hard way that you never say no when abuelita asks you if you want to eat something– Martha’s face when he said “later”? Antoni’s face when she brought him food anyway? I DIED”

If you don’t speak Spanish but could relate to Deanna’s struggle to ask for help or take up any space at all, you inherited that from Latino culture.

Credit: @ccsaystoomuch / Twitter

Not one of us would question Deanna’s Latinidad, but we internalize so much shame for not living like we grew up in a Latin American country. Language and food are just two ways to define culture. 

Deanna relatably felt intimidated to be in the kitchen with the viejas.. Deanna felt like her Latin style was seen as “childish” in her board meetings and had trouble being taken seriously. These are the Latino-American experiences we have all experienced and they make us Latino.

If you’re feeling inspired, be like Chloe, and donate to the Latino Arts Foundation!

Credit: @festiefood / Twitter

It doesn’t matter if you don’t speak Spanish and couldn’t roast a poblano for your life–your Latinidad is bigger than that. It’s everything that gives us the birthright to claim that identity, especially in a foreign land. Whether your culture looks like the art of cafecito or appreciating Bad Bunny even though you don’t understand every word he’s saying, somos Latino.

What we do to celebrate that is what we pass on to the next generation. Donate to the Latino Arts Foundation hoy.

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