Entertainment

17 Wonder Women Who Accomplished The Impossible: Remaining Classy After La Mordida

If you have ever invited a non-Latino friend to a birthday party, there are a few warning you have to give. Unos consejitos, as they say. First, your gringo friend has to realize that some folk get very competitive when bashing a piñata, and some mild violence may occur (if your friend falls on the right end of the political spectrum, you might need to warn him that said piñata might be shaped like the current POTUS). You also have to give fair warning on abuelita tactics: your abue will try to overfeed your invitado, in a show of pure Latino hospitality. 

But perhaps the most out-there costumbres that nuestra gente have revolve around the birthday cake. When the cake arrives, your primas might take off their rings and place them gently around the candles, a ritual that is supposed to bring good luck. But the queen of all costumbres is the classic Mordida. Your convo with your guest might go something like this: “Look, before everyone has a slice of cake, the birthday girl will be pushed onto the cake and will end up all covered in icing”. The guest will look at you con cara de WHAT. You will continue: “Yes, a hair or two might fall on the cake, in which case you ignore it. Some lipstick might remain on the icing. In which case you also ignore it. And if the person does not want to do La Mordida, then someone will push their face. We will know it is coming

When people start singing Mordida, mordida, mordida, clapping feverishly”. 

Most of the times, the birthday girl ends up looking like this: 

Credit: Instagram. @mveronicaz15

However, there are true female warriors and defenders del buen estilo that have managed to remain classy during and after the pinche Mordida. This is a considerable feat, considering the stickiness and general mess involved in a merengue-rich Mexican pasteleria style cake. 

Here are some of these wonder women of all ages! 

This little princess and her mami, who have mastered the art of mess-free Mordida

Credit: Instagram. @gringonaldo_cajun

Look at the immaculate hair fascinator sported by this tiny princes del cumple. Her mom has the football grab nailed down to allow for a tiny besito on that Little Pony masterpiece. The cake remains almost intact, and so does her style. 

Twinkle and bite, little star

Credit: 58769517_140171377106405_1636695043357940306_n. Digital image. Gallery of Social. 

This chamaquita is doing the bare minimum so her cake doesn’t get all guacala and she can keep her face and her hair intact. Respect. 

Look at this balancing act!

Credit: cake_mom_with_baby_son_with_mom_boy_mom_kid_with_mom_holiday_cake_bites-554619. Digital image. PX Here

So let us get this straight: this mom is carrying a baby while someone holds a cake and she is still giving Kate Middleton vibes while pecking the cake. Double…. triple respect!

Rosa nada salvaje

Credit: 53279575_332503280716551_4751465791518250203_n. Digital image. Instarix.net
Credit: images (2). Digital image. BuenMP3

The perfect distance for the deed: far enough so they can’t push you, but close enough to barely touch the icing. The pink dress will remain untouched. Great technique, reina

La Sirenita preciosa

Credit: Instagram. @snlb21

This other little one did not let the cake ruin her Ariel outfit. She kept the merengue pretty contained to one area of her face, the area that can then be cleaned by kissing mom. What a perfect Mordida blueprint. 

The best way to prevent a mordida: look menacing

Credit: Instagram. @lilchubmonkey

We can’t get over this little girl’s face and her dad’s contemplative gaze. He knows that he is in BIG trouble if the Mordida is even thought of! Her face is so gangster and cute at the same time. 

It is all about the hair

Credit: Instagram. @sorecastillo89

This girl turned 25, an age in which el qué dirán can be pretty brutal. So just like any long-haired person knows if they have had a bit too much to drink and need to, well, to throw up, the key to keeping your dignity is to meticulously hold your hair. Sore Castillo did it in an understated, yet effective way. 

This blast from the past that shows no mess

Credit: Instagram. @febev

When browsing through old photo albums get rid of all evidence of a Mordida ever happening. This is what user @febev did, instead of posting a before-Mordida shot on her Insta. It is better not to show the aftermath of the sugary apocalypse. 

If only life was like stock photography!

Credit: depositphotos_170233840-stock-photo-woman-biting-birthday-cake.jpg. Digital image. Depositphotos

Stock photos have given us some fantastic memes. They show ridiculous and super fake situations. Just look at this elegant lady about to take a Mordida on the cake. Sure, we all celebrate with our loved ones still holding their perfectly wrapped presents while a pristine cake is about to be a victim of the infamous tradition. 

The queen of Mexican pop Thalia is class personified, even giving a Mordida

Credit: thalia-pastel-mordida-1—a. Digital image. Hola Mexico
Credit: Credit: thalia-pastel-mordida-1—a. Digital image. Hola Mexico. Digital image. Hola Mexico

We mean, is she even real? How can someone’s smile look so radiant after having had their face smashed into a sweet decadent delight?

Mordida in the age of Instagram?

Credit: embarrar-pastel-cara-tendencia-redes-sociales_cover. Digital image. PM Canal 5

That’s why we can’t have nice things. The Mordida has been gentrified! Yes, non-Latinos are now embarrandose cake all over the face and posting glam shots. Look at these three: cultural appropriation much?

Don’t give me gato por liebre: that #adultcakesmash thing is La Mordida!

Credit: Instagram. @tonyaphipps22

There is now a trend of women turning 30 and organizing a photo shoot while doing a Cake Smash, which is gringo for La Mordida. To be honest, Tonya here looks super cute doing it, so we give her a pass. No sean criticones

That cake is a true fashion statement!

Credit: fotos 247. Digital image. La camara y el tlacuache

We can’t get over this girl’s amazing smile. She seems unbothered by the fact that her whole face is covered in artificial food coloring. We are sure, however, that Lady Gaga would love this look and perhaps incorporate it in one of her outlandish shows. 

No pushing, porfavorcito

Credit: 10523584_521191348014907_1197145469_n. Digital image. Deskgram

We love this little one’s determination. If the damn Mordida is gonna happen, it will be on her terms. By the way, that giant Oreo cake is cool as, o no?

Never too young to learn

Credit: 54447139_2245292365736559_799266132714657876_n. Digital image. Pic of Year.

This bebita who must be around four or five months old is, however, already well versed in the art of ladylike Mordidas. Wisdom travels from generation to generation. 

When Salma was classy but Jimmy Kimmel got smashed

Credit: salma-jimmy–z. Digital image. Hola Mexico.

Salma Hayek is the epitome if Mexican class, so when she visited Jimmy Kimmel she didn’t lose her cool…. whole smashing Jimmy’s face straight into a cake. Only she can pull this off and ser elegante

Dos pueden more than one

Credit: 53279575_332503280716551_4751465791518250203_n. Digital image. Instarix.net

Double trouble or how to give a double mordida and look cute while doing it.  

Here Are 15 Times That Google Paid Tribute To Latinx Culture With The Google Doodle

Culture

Here Are 15 Times That Google Paid Tribute To Latinx Culture With The Google Doodle

Google

September 22nd marks Doodle Day — yes, it’s a thing! Since 2004 Doodle Day has helped raise funds for epilepsy research. “The tagline ‘Drawing a line through epilepsy’ heads the campaign, and participants take part by submitting their doodle, along with a small donation. The Doodle Day team then judges the doodles and awards prizes accordingly,” according to Days Of The Year

There aren’t many doodles with as much reach as Google doodles, which serve as way to educate and inform people all over the world about global history. Of course, Latinxs have been contributing to arts, science, and culture for centuries. 

Check out these 15 Google Doodles that honor Latinx culture and history. 

Mercedes Sosa

Born in 1936, Argentinian singer Mercedes Sosa was known for being the “voice of the voiceless ones.” Nicknamed “La Negra” her social justice lyrics and traditional folk music allowed her to perform at Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, the Sistine Chapel, and the Colosseum in Rome.

Chile’s National Day

The country’s official flag since 1817 commemorates a multiday celebration known as Las Fiestas Patrias to honor Chile’s eight-year struggle for self-determination from Spanish colonial rule. 

Lupicínio Rodrigues

Lupicínio Rodrigues was born in 1914 in Brazil, today his name is “synonymous with the musical genre samba-canção, also known as samba triste or ‘sad samba.’”

Ynés Mexía

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Mexican American botanist and explorer Ynes Mexia received this tribute. In 1925, Mexía traveled to Sinaloa, Mexico to find rare botanical species. On the trip, she fell off a cliff, fractured her hand and ribs, and still managed to return home with 500 species, 50 of which were undiscovered. 

Tin Tan

The actor, singer, and comedian Tin Tan was born in Mexico City in 1915. Tin Tan helped to popularize pachuco culture with films like The Jungle Book and The Aristocats.

Eduardo Ramírez Villamizar

Born in Pamplona, Colombia in 1922, Villamizar was an innovative painter and sculptor. After traveling to Paris and New York in the 1950s to much acclaim, he became a pioneer of abstract Colombian art. 

Ignacio Anaya García

Ignacio Anaya García’ was born in 1895. In 1943, García invented nachos. What more needs to be said about the magnitude of his culinary contributions? Nachos! 

Arantza Peña Popo  

Afro-Columbian artist Arantza Peña Popo made history when she won Google’s “Doodle For Google” contest in 2019. The art entitled “Once you get it, give it back” features two generations of Afro-Latinx mothers and daughters.

Dr. Matilde Montoya

The first female physician in Mexico, born in 1859, Dr. Matilde Montoya petitioned President Porfirio Díaz to be allowed into medical school. Dr. Montoya had already earned her degree as a midwife at 16, but she wanted more. Dr. Montoya paid her success forward. After her application was accepted, she demanded the House of Representatives to change the rules and permanently allow female students into the School of Medicine.

Lucha Reyes

Born into poverty in 1936, Peruvian singer Lucha Reyes beat the odds by becoming one of the country’s most adored singers. Reyes helped to popularize the Afro-Peruvian genre of music música criolla which blended Creole, Afro-Peruvian, and Andean musical traditions.

Evangelina Elizondo

Mexican actress Evangelina Elizondo was born in 1929. She would become a star of Mexican Cinema’s Golden Age. Fun fact: this Google doodle was created by the Mexican guest artist Valeria Alvarez. 

Abraham Valdelomar

Writer and caricaturist Abraham Valdelomar was born in 1888 in Peru. A humorous prodigy, Valdelomar is remembered for his cuentos criollos. In 1916, he founded the literary magazine Colónida, which helped Peruvians discovered fresh literary talent like José María Eguren.

Raúl Soldi  

Argentinian artist Raúl Soldi was born in Buenos Aires in 1905. Soldi was a painter, costume designer, and even did department store windows.

“Recognized in his country and globally, a 1992 retrospective at Argentina’s Palais de Glace attracted some 500,000 visitors and his work was honored with an award at the 1958 Biennale of São Paulo, Brazil.”

Simón Rodríguez  

Venezuela’s Simón Rodríguez devoted his life to educating others. A scholar, philosopher, and teacher born in Caracas in 1771, he would prove to be a precocious student. As a teacher, among his students Simón Bolivar, he proposed creating well-funded, well-trained schools that included students of all ethnicities and social backgrounds. 

Mexican Independence Day

Mexican guest artist Dia Pacheco created this Google doodle to commemorate Mexico’s Independence Day. Inspired by indigenous Mexican crafts and textiles like Oaxacan embroidery and children’s toys, the animated rehiletes are a beautiful homage.

These Día De Los Muertos Inspired Tattoos Will Make You Want To Get Inked Right Away

Fierce

These Día De Los Muertos Inspired Tattoos Will Make You Want To Get Inked Right Away

As Fall begins to slowly cool the weather outside, we begin to think about the spooky season and all the things that come with it. It isn’t just Halloween that we’re looking forward to. We also have Día de  Los Muertos to anticipate. 

Observed by the people of central and south Mexico, The Day of the Dead is a celebration of ancestors and life on the other side of death. It has also become a holiday that has fed into our collective pop culture with images of its sugar skulls, marigolds and monarch butterflies. These images have worked their way into artwork and have especially become popular subjects of tattoos. 

With that in mind, we found some breathtaking Día de Los Muertos tattoos. Maybe they’ll inspire you to get some Day of the Dead ink as well. 

1. This watercolor beauty.

Instagram / @piotr.balcerak.tattoo

What makes this sketchy and bold tattoo brilliant is its watercolor style. Mimicking the freedom and flow that watercolor paintings have, watercolor tattoos venture outside line art to bleed color into the canvass. This intricate skull is a great example of this tattoo style. 

2. The OG skeleton prince.

Instagram / @somozaart

One of the most recognizable skull daddies gets a Día de Los Muertos makeover in this black and white tattoo. Jack Skeleton looks like a natural all decked out with common designs typically seen on sugar skulls. The skeleton might be the Pumpkin King but he looks like the King of the Dead in this tattoo.

3. *Mariachi music intensifies.*

Instagram / @yamambatattooshop

What’s more Mexican than authentic mariachi music? A mariachi skull musician. Dressed as a traditional mariachi, this skull comes complete with a sombrero and a guitar. We can just imagine him yelling a grito as he begins his next song.

4. Hummingbird of the dead.

Instagram / @carinathebarber

This tattoo captures the delicacy of one of Mexico’s most lovely creatures. This hummingbird takes flight on colorful wings and its boldly displayed skeleton against a Mayan background. 

5. Dia de Los Meowtos

Instagram / @necromandi 

Commemorating these cute little toe beans, this tattoo features a small calavera and a Mexican cempasúchil blossom. The Mexican cempasúchil or marigold is used on ofrendas and graves to honor departed ancestors.

6. Skeleton queen.

Instagram / @luckybirdtattoo

Besides calaveras, Día de Los Muertos tats often feature female sugar skulls. This one, for example, shows a skeleton beauty adorned with a crown of skulls, bones and marigold petals. 

7. A Mexican-American beauty.

Instagram /@sasquatch_linked

This sugar skull girl combines two cultures into one to show off a love of both countries. With roses in her hair that are colored to represent the Mexican and United States flags, this tattoo embodies its wearer’s Mexican-American identity.

8. This macabre mandala. 

Instagram / @shane.ryan.ink

Mandalas are a common element in tattoos. It’s a geometric figure representing the universe in Hindu and Buddhist symbolism. This mandala got a Day of the Dead upgrade with the addition of identical calaveras. 

9. An undead Disney princess. 

Instagram / @aevrard_

The guaranteed way to make a beloved figure even better is to give them the Día de las Muertos treatment. In this tattoo, Disney beauty Belle becomes a sugar skull girl and is adorned with a crown of flowers.

10. A sacred heart/skeleton combo.

Instagram / @richardpevahouse

The sacred heart is another identifiable subject in tattoos and is meant to symbolize the heart of Christ. This Day of the Dead calavera sports his own sacred heart, positively bursting from his chest in this dynamic piece.

11. Decked out in roses and jewels.

Instagram / @ink848

This tattoo takes a harsh subject matter a skull and makes it delicate and beautiful with the addition of jewelry and roses. The light gray shading gives it an even softer look. 

12. A Day of the Dead matruschka

Instagram / @dappertattoo

Here’s another collab between cultures with a Día de los Muertos matruschka. The Russian nesting doll is painted as an adorable sugar skull in a truly unique piece of artwork. 

13. Dia de Spidey.

Instagram / @gonzoetattoos

We might see this web slinger paroling the streets of Mexico City. Spider Man looks like a regular sugar skull with a few added decorations to his mask. 

14. *A wild Cubone appeared!*

Instagram / @missmarilyn_tattoos

Since this Pokémon already comes with his own skull helmet, it seems only naturally for it to be decorated for Day of the Dead. This tattoo is extremely creative and is definitely an unforgettable bit of art. 

15. A stylized Catrina.

Instagram / @peco_wolftown 

 La Calavera Catrina has become an icon of the Day of the Dead since she was first etched by Mexican artist José Guadalupe Posada back in 1910. This tattoo offers Catrina a modern makeover. Her blank stare is positively eerie and give us major creepy vibes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ygZXhDiueo