Culture

Woman Sentenced For Physically Attacking 91-Year-Old Abuelito With A Brick

Laquisha Jones has been sentenced to 15 years for the physical attack on 91-year-old Rodolfo Rodriguez in Willowbrook, California on July 4, 2018. The attack was witnessed by a passing motorist who took video of the bloodied Rodriguez and snapped a picture of Jones for police.

Laquisha Jones is facing 15 years in prison following a brutal attack last year.

Credit: @cgarciadealba / Twitter

Jones was charged with felony elder abuse in December following her attack on Rodriguez in July 2018. Jones attacked Rodriguez with a brick claiming he tried to touch her daughter as he passed them on the sidewalk. According to ABC 7 News, Jones was on probation after being convicted for making criminal threats. As part of a plea agreement, Jones pleaded no contest to the charge of elder abuse in order to avoid the heavier charges of attempted murder and elder abuse with a hate crime component, according to the New York Times.

Jones was facing a possible hate crime charge added to her case because she was reported to tell Rodriguez to “go back to your country” during the attack. The attack left Rodriguez with a broken jaw, broken cheekbones, broken ribs, and bruises all over his body.

Rodriguez claims there was a group of men that helped Jones in the attack.

Credit: @mobbiemobes / Twitter

Rodriguez and a witness of the attack, Misbel Borjas, told authorities that four men joined in on the attack. According to Borjas, Jones told the men that Rodriguez tried to touch her daughter and they joined in attacking Rodriguez.

Immediately after the attack, Borjas took video of a bloodied and bruised Rodriguez as he laid on the grass. She also took a photo of Jones holding the brick used in the attack to turn over to the police.

A photo of the woman taken by a witness was a pivotal part of finding and arresting the man’s attacker.

Jones was booked and the bail was set at $1.1 million because of the assault and violation of probation. Despite trying to hide from her attorney in the news footage, Jones was held accountable for her actions in the end and entered a plea deal that lowered her crimes.

The attack garnered national attention because of the victim’s age and number of attackers.

Credit: @JewsMatterToMe / Twitter

Jones was arrested just days after the attack in July 2018 and was in county jail waiting for her court date in December. The unprovoked attack made headlines since Rodriguez was visiting his family from Michoacán, Mexico, which he frequently did.

Rodriguez is pleased with the decision in court.

Credit: @4seasonstix / Twitter

According to KCAL9, Rodriguez said he is “happy and good, thanks to God” after the sentencing. He continued through an interpreter that “everyone makes mistakes. We have to forgive each other because God forgives us.”

READ: A Group Of Men And A Woman Attacked A 92-Year-Old Man While Telling Him To Go Back To His Country

A Louisiana Cop Has Been Fired After Saying It Was ‘Unfortunate’ That The Coronavirus Hasn’t Killed More Black People

Things That Matter

A Louisiana Cop Has Been Fired After Saying It Was ‘Unfortunate’ That The Coronavirus Hasn’t Killed More Black People

Dan Kitwood / Getty

study released last week, as U.S. deaths from the Coronavirus approached the 100,000 mark, shows that the black population is dying of the virus at a rate 3.57 times higher than the white population. In some places, such as New York, that rate is even higher.

That is apparently not enough for a Louisiana police officer, who has been fired for writing on Facebook that it is “unfortunate” more black people have not died of the deadly illness.

A white Louisiana cop has been fired following a social media post that revealed his views on the Coronavirus and black people.

Steven Aucoin was a police officer with the Kaplan Police Department – a town about 60 miles outside the Louisiana capital of Baton Rouge. He was fired earlier this month after an investigation showed he made extremely racist comments on a Facebook post.

Aucoin’s comments, which were shown in a screenshot of the live stream, were in response to another user who described the Coronavirus as the “virus that was created to kill all the BLACKS is death.” The officer clearly responded with two statements, “Well it didn’t work.” And directly under that comment he then said, “How unfortunate.”

In another section of the thread, Aucoin wrote, “I can’t wait until the next part of the plan is implemented and they see what’s in store for their kind.”

The police chief investigated the comments and quickly fired Aucoin.

Credit: Kaplan Police Department / Facebook

According to Kaplan Police Chief Joshua Hardy, the matter was looked into, investigated, and Aucoin was fired shortly after.

In a brief statement posted to Facebook, the agency said “Chief Hardy and the Kaplan Police Department would like to apologize for this matter. As a police officer, we’re held to a higher standard than normal civilians, so you got to watch what you do. You got to watch what you say.”

Aucoin’s firing was met with some applause – including in meme form – on the department’s Facebook page.

Credit: Kaplan Police Department / Facebook

“I applaud your swift and decisive action regarding this matter,” one commenter wrote. “Your willingness to serve notice on bigotry and ignorance is a genuine representation of redoubtable leadership that is necessary during these difficult times.”

The racist officer’s comments and firing comes as a number of high-profile racial incidences have made headlines across the country.

Credit: Shaun Rayford / Getty

Just a few weeks ago, the brutal murder of Ahmaud Arbery – a 25-year-old black man – made headlines after a video was shared on social media of former police officer Gregory McMichael and son Travis that chasing and gunning him down. The two men were arrested and public outrage over the lack of response from local officials in February has been wide-spread.

Shortly after that, a video showing a white Minneapolis Police Department officer kneeling on the neck of George Floyd for over 8 minutes, until he died, has sparked outrage and massive protests against the murder around the country.

Also in May, a white woman named Amy Cooper was walking her dog off the leash in Central Park in New York. When a black man  – Christian Cooper, who was out bird watching – asked if she could put her dog on the leash, she called the cops on him, saying her life was being threatened by an ‘African American man’. She has since been terminated from her job as head of insurance investment solutions at Franklin Templeton on Tuesday, having been placed on administrative leave a day earlier. 

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo Are The Women Fighting To Find The Stolen Children During The Argentine Dictatorship

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Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo Are The Women Fighting To Find The Stolen Children During The Argentine Dictatorship

Sundance Institute

During the 1970s a group of desperate Argentinian mothers began protesting government officials and holding them accountable for the human rights violations that had been committed in the military junta  known as the Dirty War. The determined women violated the government’s law against mass assembly and risked the ire of Argentina’s military dictatorship to expose the government’s human rights violations. The biggest part of their fight however had been to expose the kidnapping of over 30,000 individuals known today as “Desaparecidos” or “the disappeared.”

The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo (or, the Asociación Madres de Plaza de Mayo) is a movement of Argentine mothers who campaigned to find out what happened to their children who had “disappeared” during the 1976 government takeover.

The mothers’ tragic stories began in 1976. At the time the Argentine military had toppled the presidency of Isabel Perón. According to History.com, “it was part of a larger series of political coups called Operation Condor, a campaign sponsored and supported by the United States.” The new military dictatorship resulted in the Dirty War, which was ultimately a fight against the Argentinian people. It opened doors to a period of state-sponsored torture and terrorism and saw the government turn against Argentina’s citizens, targeting those suspected of being aligned with leftist, socialist or social justice. As part of the rule of terror, the government kidnapped and killed an estimated 30,000 people. They also made great efforts to cover up the dead and missing people.

But the family members and friends of the missing victims fought for the truth.

The mothers and relatives of people who went missing during the war searched for their loved ones and began to stage protests at the Plaza de Mayo in the 1980s. 

According to History.com “Some of the mothers of the disappeared were grandmothers who had seen their daughters whisked away and presumably killed and their grandchildren given away to other families. Even after the Dirty War ended in 1983, the Grandmothers of the Plaza Mayo have searched for answers and worked to identify children who grew up without any knowledge of their true parents.”

Today the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo have verified the identities of 128 stolen children, thanks to DNA identification techniques but the fight of these mothers and grandmothers lives on. Sadly, thousands of Argentinian children remain missing.

The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo is a 1985 Argentine documentary film that highlights the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo.

At the time of its release, it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature and in 2013, received an update on “Abuelas: Grandmothers on a Mission” which highlights the work of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo in Argentina.