Culture

This Woman From NYC Did A ‘Why I’m Single Brochure’ And She Totally Roasted Her Tía

We all know what it’s like to mentally prepare to see family after you’ve moved away from home. You’re going to hear all of the “ay, que flaquita” and “¿y el novio?” questions all in one breath. Those are just the most common questions. We all know that it never ends there. People are going to ask you about your job a million different ways, and still not get it.

Of course, every single viejo is going to ask you why you’re still single. “Mejor sola que mal acompañada,” so they say. Well, Melissa Croce had a lot more than that to tell her family and her reaction is something that can help all of us get ready for that family reunion.

Melissa Croce wanted to nip all questions in the bud with a handy brochure.

@melissacroce / Twitter

Apparently, it all started as a joke between Croce and her coworkers, but she couldn’t let go of the idea. After you read her brochure, you’ll understand why it’s so cathartic.

“So You Haven’t Seen Melissa Croce in Several Years: A Primer”

Here’s a lil life update on the subject of your chismosando, honey. “She’s beauty and she’s grace. She’ll say it to your face.” Boom. Roasted. Who hasn’t felt the same way when getting ready to see your family?

Croce handily has two separate columns for Job vs New York FAQS.

@melissacroce / Twitter

So many folks had a good laugh at the “Should you, though?” in response to “I should come visit you!” We’ve all braced ourselves through a fake grin answering highly judgmental questions. When they go low, we go high. When they go low, we go high. This brochure is pure low. 😂

You open the brochure to the question of the house: “Why is Melissa Single?”

@melissacroce / Twitter

You can choose whatever adventurous conversation experience you are initiating. What a perfect way to let the family know what they’re getting themselves into by passing judgment on single, working women.

Croce tweeted out her brochure and may have started a new side hustle for herself!

@EM_bolden / Twitter

Follow your passions and everything else will follow. Even though Latinas can all relate to being asked this question, sexism is universal. Croce might have a new career calling!

Even folks are asking for her career advice at this point.

@rheaswriting / Twitter

When you see success, you chase it, right? Croce works for a publishing company but isn’t editing or reading books. She’s marketing children’s books. You know, in case you didn’t read the brochure.

Croce didn’t actually pass out the brochures.

@KelseyMarrujo / Twitter

Of course, one *man* commented that, “The only thing that would be more petty than this would be actually giving it to people at the wedding.”

Croce told Buzzfeed, “I didn’t hand the brochures out! For one thing, I like my cousin, and secondly, I don’t think my aunts and uncles would’ve been too pleased with me if I did — but I did have to answer many of the questions on the brochure, so maybe I should’ve after all!”

One fan took the opportunity to formally ask Croce to be her life coach.

@EmiCalico / Twitter

Croce was surprised to learn how relatable her experience was–“going to a big event and exposing the basics of your life to people who mean well, but are also strangers in many ways.”

She said yes, of course.

@melissacroce / Twitter

We’re glad some folks are appreciating Croce because the sexism hasn’t relented since she tweeted out the brochure. Folks have been telling her, “boo hoo, suck it up,” and “we get it, you’re sexist and hate men.”

Nope. Women expressing their frustration with sexism is not allowed in a patriarchal society, and that’s not stopping anyone.

So many people are taking this brochure to heart and figuring out how they can make it their own.

@little_mswriter / Twitter

Thank you, Croce, and we hope the half dozen folks who have publicly reached out asking for their own brochure. If you’re reading this, Croce, we’ll leave you with this friendly message from @jmlandais:

“You definitely are good at your work. Turned your angst in a great brochure that stroke a nerve. I think you can ask for a raise.”

READ: What To Expect If You’re Introducing Your Novio To The Fam

#OKBoomer Is The Hashtag Millennials Are Using To Let Baby Boomers Know Their Opinions Aren’t Wanted

Culture

#OKBoomer Is The Hashtag Millennials Are Using To Let Baby Boomers Know Their Opinions Aren’t Wanted

god_damn_sam / Instagram

This country — already divided between liberals and conservatives — is now enduring another division, but this time it’s a generational thing. Young people, who typically get the brunt of being a scapegoat, are calling foul against older people who never get tired of life-splaining. This type of separation is nothing new, the only difference with generational venting is that we now have the internet to help us shout it out from the rooftops. Thanks to memes, TikTok, and hashtags, each message whether valid or not gets punctured into the cultural-sphere and lives there for a week or so and then hibernates until the next internet phenomenon. This week the Boomers are to blame for our societies woes — sort of. 

Before we explain the #OKBoomer hashtag, here’s a breakdown of generational age groups, so you can keep track of the players:

Credit: juicydumpstur / Instagram

Here’s where each age group stands. 

  • The Greatest Generation (or GI Generation): Born in 1924 or earlier.
  • The Silent Generation: Born 1925-1945. 
  • Baby Boomers: Born 1946-1964. 
  • Generation X: Born 1965-1976. 
  • Xennials: Born 1977-1984.
  • Millennials: Born 1985-1996.
  • Generation Z: Born 1997-current.

Now back to the drama.

Generation Z has been using the term “Ok Boomer” for a couple of months. Now, the rest of the world has finally caught on thanks to some trendy new merch and Twitter dialogue.

Credit: thesnobette / Instagram

After discussing the “Ok Boomer” phrase with a Gen Z person in my household, they told me that it’s basically a term that young people are saying in response to old people who think they know better. “It’s like us saying ‘whatever.'”  They added, “we are just making fun of them and everybody.” The sentiment goes a lot deeper than that. 

“The older generations grew up with a certain mindset, and we have a different perspective,” 19-year-old Shannon O’Connor told the New York Times. O’Conner created a very stylish hoodie with the “Ok Boomer” phrase on it, and she sold more than 10,000 sweatshirts. “A lot of them don’t believe in climate change or don’t believe people can get jobs with dyed hair, and a lot of them are stubborn in that view. Teenagers just respond, ‘Ok, boomer.’ It’s like, we’ll prove you wrong, we’re still going to be successful because the world is changing.”

Now some (white) Boomers are getting their panties in a bunch and saying #OkBoomer is like using the N-word. Um… don’t think so, buddy. 

Credit: @Oskaer__13 / Twitter

Yes, “Bob Lonsberry,” a Christian, father, and veteran actually compared “OKBoomer” to the N-word. He just proves some older people need to take a seat and shut up. 

Some have wondered if older Latino people would ever be okay if their kid was flippant enough to dismiss them with that term.

Credit: Twitter

Latinos on social media said they would never disrespect their elders by saying “OKBoomer” to them. While others shared, Latino Boomers aren’t to blame for today’s societal issues. 

We’re not sure how long “OKBoomer” will last, but just for posterity purposes, here are some of the best #OKBoomer tweets, memes, videos, and songs — there’s a lot out there.

Credit: @eugenegu / Twitter

Where’s the lie?

This little diddy goes to those 65 and older.

It’s pretty catchy and you can dance to it. 

Let’s keep one thing straight: a hashtag isn’t nearly as bad as oppression. 

Credit: @dick_for_nipple / Twitter

Why do Boomers have such thin skin?

Gen Z’ers are bringing up serious issues. 

Credit: @morganisawizard / Twitter

This “OKBoomer” trend might seem silly to some, but when you break it down, these young people will be confronted with a new way of life that will be nothing like anyone has ever experienced, including Boomers.

A fight to the death! Or at least a fight on social media. 

Credit: @Terlerr / Twitter

That work of art belongs in the Louvre museum in Paris. 

This Gen Z master should run for president.

Credit: @LouisatheLast / Twitter

Mr. Trump, now that is what you call a good thread. 

If you’re wondering when and how you can use the “OK Boomer” term and tell off your least favorite old person to be quiet, here’s a near-perfect example

The video above features a white older male telling all of Generation Z that their idea of a utopian world is not possible because it’s not sustainable. Yadda Yadda Yadda, “ok boomer.”

READ: AOC Has Receipts For Abuelas That Breakdowns The Thousands Of Dollars Worth Of Reasons Why You’re Not Having Kids

From Strained Family Ties To Outright Abuse, These Women Opened Up About Interracial Dating

Fierce

From Strained Family Ties To Outright Abuse, These Women Opened Up About Interracial Dating

whitemenblackwomendating / Instagram

Many of us date people from different cultures and backgrounds. We asked our FIERCE community if they had stories related to the issues they had dating someone of a different ethnicity and the responses were enlightening, hopeful and sometimes even a bit heartbreaking.

Differences can be overwhelming but interest is super key.

“For me was so difficult. I’m Mexican, raise and born in Mexico and I was dating with a Xicano man, but he never was into the Mexican culture… long story short, we broke up. Some differences were overwhelming.”

Expressing excitement over exchanging cultures goes a long way.

“My husband of 13 years is a white American while I’m Mexican American, first born generation of immigrants. He loves my heritage and appreciates my family. He gravitates toward our culture because his family doesn’t really have anything like that except being American, which is kind of boring to him. They know they are a big mix of English, Irish, and Scottish with some Dutch and German but that’s really the extent of it… he’s also learned Spanish and went with me to live in Cuernavaca for a month to study.”

The sad truth is that fear of being judged or mistreated sometimes keeps us from such fulfilling relationships.

“We don’t. We get dirty looks everywhere we go. I’m either a traitor or a thief.”

Previous interactions with other races and proper communication are vital

“I think both of us being bi-racial (myself being Ecuadorian and Irish, my bf being Black and Polish) has shown us that there are many different ways to do the same thing and that not all things are as they appear. When we run into those cultural differences, it helps to try to see the duality of the situation. Communication and respect are [key].”

You can both learn about your cultures together.

whitemenblackwomendating / Instagram

“I play him the Mexican survival guide videos. Very accurate, also lots of communication!”

Talk about the shared struggles of your cultures.

italian_stallionne / Instagram

” I’m really passionate about this topic. I’m Mexican-American & my husband is South African. Like my parents, he’s an immigrant. A white immigrant. While the differences of being a white immigrant and a Mexican one are obvious, it’s the shared struggles & similar perspectives that are worth highlighting.
One perspective that has struck me is when my husband said, “I noticed Americans don’t make eye contact. In South Africa we at least acknowledge a person by doing so….” then I sarcastically thought to myself, ‘wow, what an idea. People recognizing the existence of other human beings.” Though I am guilty of this! BUT. Why am I guilty of this? Could it be that I was raised to acknowledge others even if it meant hugging every tia & tio in the room? Or my favorite, less intimidating way of respectfully recognizing that your fellow humans are present while also respecting your boundaries: greeting a room full of strangers with a smile & a “buenos días,” as you sit quietly in an open chair at the doctors office? But we don’t do this in America, at least not where I’m from. Most of us tend to do the opposite of acknowledge each other.
So back to the point:
we navigate our cultural differences by having these kinds of dialogues; connecting the dots. Mapping out how different humans attempt to figure out this crazy world we live where a wild fascination with the color of skin & borders exist. Who are we when we let go of our country & our skin?”

Speak up but also listen and learn.

“I’m Mexican and my bf is black/puerto rican my family has knew about him before when I talked to him in high school but they never really liked the fact that we were together so they separated me from him and made me switch high schools my senior year it was hard I talked to other people the two years we lost contact but realized he’s my happiness and now I gave us another chance without my family knowing I’m still figuring out how I’m going to let everyone know Ik that some of my family will shut me out because they are really old school/ traditional Mexicans and what me to be with someone of my race and my beliefs but we love each other so we are gonna make this work.”

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

interracialkissing / Instagram

“Respect, appreciation and being open to conversation. He still thinks I’m a little crazy for wanting to one day pierce our future daughter’s ears.”

When you have kids, be sure keep your families involved.

“Been in a 10 year relationship. My husband is Asian and it’s been so hard even til now. His family has a hard time dealing with the fact that he is with a Mexican woman. We have two kids and I can count with one hand how many times they have seen my kids. I have a 6 year old and a 3 year old. My son looks completely Asian and my daughter looks mixed. Just a few days ago he asked me why me and his dad look so different and I told him we are from two different ethnicities, different parts of the world. He said he wished he was only Mexican and looked like mommy  it’s hard because my family is all he’s ever had. We try to visit his family but they always say they are busy. Being in a interracial relationship has been so hard for me. It’s been so draining they even encouraged him to cheat in the beginning of our marriage. I’m drained, don’t know how much longer I can do this for. I know this is not the case for all interracial relationships but it’s been hell for me.”