Culture

Mexico City Paints Its LGBTQ Pride Across A Pedestrian Crossing And The People Are Here For It

June is Pride month in countries all around the world. It’s no different in Mexico which celebrates its Pride Parade at the end of the month.

But to kick off the start of Pride season, the city painted a pedestrian crossing in all the colors of the rainbow!

The pedestrian crossing that was painted crosses one of the city’s most important streets – Avenida Juarez.

Credit: @TikitakasMX / Twitter

Avenida Juarez runs right in front of the famous Palacio de Bellas Artes, a very popular tourist attraction in the city. So tons of people are going to see this colorful display of orgullo!

A group of volunteers painted the zebra crossing and it was sponsored by YAAJ Mexico and Copred to begin the commemorations of Pride Month.

The rainbow pedestrian crossing has made news across the country.

Credit: @gayquinanaroo / Twitter

From Quintana Roo to Tabasco and Chiapas, everyone has been talking about the Pride display.

I mean it’s only the second time that the city has paid respect to the LGBT community in this way. So it really is a big deal.

While painting the crossing with the colors of the pride flag, Geraldina González de la Vega told SoyHomosensual that “with this act, we symbolically inaugurate June as LGBT Pride month. It is about making visible that all people have a place in a diverse Mexico City.”

Rainbow pedestrian crossings to celebrate Pride have become more common around the world.

Credit: @jackfmnews / Twitter

Like this gem out of Oxfordshire, UK.

Or this one out of the Phillipines.

Credit: @PonceNitz / Twitter

It’s amazing to see so many cities around the world step up to celebrate their diversity.

Happy Pride!

READ: Bad Bunny Is The Modern Icon The Queer Latino Community Needs And Deserves Right Now. Here’s Why

Gay Man Dubbed Karen For Saying He Wants Everyone To Catch COVID In IG Video

Things That Matter

Gay Man Dubbed Karen For Saying He Wants Everyone To Catch COVID In IG Video

Corey Hannon / Facebook / coreyhannon / Instagram

Corey Hannon, a gay man in New York, has received severe backlash after a video he posted to his IG story. Hannon, who suspected he might have COVID-19, went to Fire Island for the holiday weekend drawing anger.

NYC resident Corey Hannon is facing severe backlash on social media after posting this video.

The video was taken while Hannon was partying on Fire Island over the 4th of July holiday weekend. The video shows an upset Hannon claiming to have had COVID and went to the island after quarantining for 8 days. Then he takes a turn and says he hopes everyone catches COVID.

Hannon also allegedly shared on Facebook that his body felt like it was still sick while on Fire Island.

COVID-19 is still a very serious health risk in the United States. The holiday weekend saw spikes of COVID infections across the country proving the seriousness of the virus. According to The New York Times, the U.S. recorded more than 56,000 new infections on July 3rd and more than 50,000 on July 4th. New daily infection numbers have been increasing aggressively since mid-June when states began rushing reopening plans.

The backlash to the videos and posts was swift, widespread, and brutal.

Twitter was filled with people denouncing the actions of Hannon in the midst of a pandemic. Some countries have begun to return to a form of normal after strict isolation measures. The U.S. has been criticized by the international community because of a lack of a national strategy. Instead, infection numbers have continued to climb in the U.S. forcing some states, counties, and cities to pause, suspend, and even reverse reopenings.

Hannon posted a video and people are not buying his “apology.”

Here’s my apology, comments, and my story. Because I failed to mention dates of my COVID timeline here they are:…

Posted by Corey Hannon on Sunday, July 5, 2020

In the video, Hannon spends more time apologizing for how people perceived his actions than apologizing for his actions. For a moment, Hannon decided to talk about cancel culture and how it is going too far. He laments about the messages he has received in light of the video going viral.

Some people have gone so far as to call Hannon’s actions racist because of how much more communities of color are being infected. Black, Latino, and immigrant communities are all facing disproportionate numbers of COVID-19 cases. A lack of access to healthcare and outreach around COVID-19 has led to these communities facing higher infection and death rates as the virus continues to spread in the U.S.

Hannon’s video forced people to take a closer look at Fire Island this weekend and it was just…well…

Giancarlo Kristian Albanese, a currency analyst, also shared his feelings about health measures designed to slow the spread of the virus and save lives. An image shared to Instagram shows a sea of men with no social distancing and no masks insight on Fire Island.

Some people on social media are just stunned by this kind of behavior.

And this is why we can’t have anythingSee y’all 2021

Posted by Logan Slaughter on Saturday, July 4, 2020

The virus is still a very serious threat in the U.S. The European Union has banned tourists from the U.S. to visit because of our inability to control the viral outbreak in the U.S. Our numbers have skyrocketed in recent months with our death number recently cross over 130,000.

Scientists, health experts, and politicians are calling for Americans to act together and wear masks and practice social distancing. Studies and research from around the world have shown that one of the most effective tools in slowing the spread of COVID-19 is the face mask.

READ: Man Posts Plea For People To Social Distance After Falling Ill Of COVID-19 And Died The Next Day

This Is What Mexico Looks Like As It Reopens During A Global Pandemic

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This Is What Mexico Looks Like As It Reopens During A Global Pandemic

Hector Vivas / Getty Images

Step outside into Mexico’s capital (home to more than 20 million people) and you’d be forgiven for not realizing we’re still in the midst of a global pandemic that’s killed more than half a million people.

As of this week, several Mexican states have entered the initial phase of reopening and Mexicans are taking full advantage of the newly found sense of ‘freedom’ – visiting restaurants, cafés and shops in droves. However, experts warn that Mexico will likely follow the dangerous path of the United States – which opened prematurely and is now having to shut down businesses once again as cases reach record levels.

Here’s an inside look into the daily reality of Chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) and what the future holds for the country amid Coronavirus.

Mexico City – along with 17 other states – have entered the first phase of a gradual reopening.

Despite being home to the largest number of active cases across Mexico, the capital joined 17 other states in a phased reopening this week. Mexico City lowered its contagion risk from a level red (the most extreme) to level orange, which permits some businesses to reopen.

However, Mexico City – on the day of the reopening – saw a record 5,432 new cases and 638 confirmed deaths. Mayor Sheinbaum said that the switch to orange was possible because hospital occupancy levels are at 59% and trending downwards. But to many, the government is prioritizing the economy over public safety and health. Several government officials insisted that it was safe to proceed to the reduced warning level but health experts disagreed.

The mayor stressed that if hospital occupancy levels go above 65% again, red light restrictions will be reinstated. She urged residents to continue to take precautions to reduce the risk of infection. People should continue to stay at home as much as possible and the use of face masks in public places remains mandatory.

Along with Mexico City, 17 other states moved into the orange phase of reopening – including tourist hotspots of Jalisco, Veracruz, Quintana Roo, and Yucatan.

The federal government instituted a traffic light system to simplify the risk management of Covid-19

Credit: omgitsjustintime/ Instagram

Shortly after the Coronavirus outbreak began, the federal government instituted a color-coded risk management system to simplify its messaging. With red being the highest risk level and green being the lowest, every state until June 15th was still in the red level.

As of July 1, 18 states are now in the orange level. This means that restaurants, cafés, and shops can begin to reopen with reduced capacity. Hotels and markets will also be allowed to resume service, meaning that tourism will likely begin to pick up again very soon.

President AMLO has been eager to get the economy reopened after it was reported that at least one million formal jobs have been lost and the country’s economy is expected to shrink by 8.8% this year.

On the first day of reopening, shops in Mexico City’s historic center were jammed full of shoppers.

Credit: Raul Hidalgo / Getty Images

The city’s historical center is a hub of economic activity. You can literally find pretty much anything you could ever want in these cobblestones streets. The district is home to more than 27,000 businesses and as of this week they’re now permitted to open once again. And resident wasted no time in hitting the shops.

Long lines formed outside shops with few people wearing masks and most stores not truly enforcing social distancing requirements. Some offered antibacterial gel and took people’s temperatures before allowing them to enter.

Officially, shops and businesses with an odd street number are permitted to open three days a week, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, whereas even-numbered shops can open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

In order to prevent crowds from accumulating and promote social distancing, 31 streets were converted into pedestrian-only zones.

Restaurants, cafés, and shopping centers are all open for business – with some protective measurements in place.

Credit: omgitsjustintime/ Instagram

Even before the official change to semáforo naranja, several restaurants and cafés were already offering dine-in service. But now restaurants are officially allowed to operate at limited capacity, while staff are required to wear masks and shields, and restaurants are’s allowed to play music or issue reusable menus.

Street markets, known as tianguis, will also be allowed to restart which will help many of the city’s informal workers. And the following week, department stores and shopping malls will also be allowed to reopen at 30% capacity and with limited hours.

Mexico is hardly finished with the Coronavirus threat – in fact, cases have been reaching record levels.

Credit: Covid.gob.mx

Although not yet at the levels seen in the U.S. or Brazil, Mexico has been struggling with its response to the Coronavirus pandemic. As of July 1, the country has had more than 225,000 confirmed cases and almost 28,000 deaths, with Mexico City being the epicenter of the nation’s outbreak.

And the worst doesn’t appear to be over. In a Covid-19 situation report published Monday, the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security noted that Mexico had reported a decreasing daily incidence for three consecutive days.

“However, Mexico does not yet appear to have reached its peak,” the report said. “Based on recent trends, we expect Mexico to report increasing daily incidence over the coming days. Mexico is currently No. 6 globally in terms of daily incidence,” it added.