Culture

A Grocery Store Owner In Mexico Was Tired Of The Salsa He Was Selling So He Started Making His Own

One thing that no one can ever take away from us Latinos is that we know how to hustle. When we see an opportunity we take it, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Whether we were taught to sell crap at the swap meet, babysit the neighbor’s annoying kids, sell liquados from our backyard, or make cakes out of our kitchen, we know how to make a buck. That is why this next story of homemade salsas is no surprise. What is kind of shocking is that we didn’t think about selling this idea ourselves sooner, and that’s what makes this item even that more genius.

An independent Mexican grocer noticed that all the sauces he sold at his store had a ton of preservatives.

Credit: elpatohotsauce / Instagram

Juan García, the owner of Super Carnicería La 18 in the border town of Matamoros in Mexico, said the lack of authentic Mexican sauces —without preservatives — made him wonder why he couldn’t create real sauces himself. 

“Our specialty is roast meat, we have 35 years of experience in that, but we began to see that the sauces that were sold had many [preservatives],” García said in an interview with El Pais. He added that because they sell their on-demand meat on the weekends, they also prepare their own recipes to accompany the foods. He said in order to make their signature recipe, they had to buy machines to start producing their homemade sauces. 

As you know, the sauce is everything. Without an excellent sauce to put on carne asada, or tacos, or flautas, or beans, or anything, you might as well not eat at all. 

García knew his signature sauce would be delicious, but he needed a way to market the sauces in order to be unique and ensure sales.

Credit: SuperCarniceriaLa18 / Facebook

“I had to get attention,” García told the publication. Yet, the question was what could he name the sauces that would attract people? The label indicated the name of the store, La 18, and that’s not particularly special. Neither is the type of salsa. Most salsas are red, green, mild, hot, etc. 

Then, just like a stroke of lightning, at least we’d like to picture it that way, García knew exactly how he’d sell the sauces. García used his own family’s story to create the branding of the sauces. 

García knew that he wanted to make it something funny and empowering so he drew inspiration from his father’s lack of English and how he was mocked for that lack of knowledge.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

“These are words that my father said,” García told el País. “He worked some time in Brownsville, but he didn’t know any English. People laughed at him.”

García adds that the only way his father could fight back against those mocking him was to curse at them. The problem was since his English wasn’t so good, his curse words were really tough to understand, but not to Latinos! We know how to understand broken English, especially that is spoken by elder Latinos. So, without further ado, let us present each salsa in all its glory.

The salsa verde salsa is called “madafaker,” which means mother f*cker.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

Incredible, right? We’ve all heard one of our abuelos or tíos say this out loud when things just weren’t going their way.

The red sauce is called “sanababish” — in other words, son of a b*tch.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

The Spanglish spelling is utter perfection. Admit it. When you read it, you read it like an angry abuelo yelling at someone in their thick accent.

Then there’s the habanero chili sauce that is straight-up Spanish, sort of.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

That reads exactly how it’s spelled: “asupichimaye” or a su pinche madre. 

“It’s what people say when they try our habanero chili sauce, because it’s very spicy,” Garcia said. Of course, it makes perfect sense.

So if you’re wondering whether or not his unique sauce naming strategy was a success or not, just check out these comments.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

You don’t have travel all the way down to Mexico to purchase these stellar sauces, they can ship them to you! The sauces have been such a success that they produce about 500 bags of each type of sauce every week. The store itself is doing so well that García plans to open a new store in Monterrey, Mexico.

Now, the question remains, which one would you try first? We’re kind of lightweights so we’d definitely try the asupichimaye green creamy sauce. What about you? Let us know in the comment section below!

READ: This Entrepreneur Worked For Years To Sell Her Authentic Mexican Sauces To The World And It Paid Off

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Latinas Talk About Their Fave Dance Craze

Culture

Latinas Talk About Their Fave Dance Craze

Lawrence Manning

There’s no denying the fact that dance has a pretty firm place in the hearts of just about every Latin American culture. Across our countries and cultures, and thanks to native and Afro roots, Latin Americans know how to toe step and grind better than the rest of them. From salsa and bachata to danzón and merengue dance has permeated our lives making parties, ceremonies, and even sad occasions some of the most memorable and colorful.

As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, we turned to Latinas to ask about their favorite dances from their cultures and how it has made their life better.

We posed the question “Latin America consists of many different cultural dances. What can you say about the ones from your país? We will be featuring your answers on one of our editorial pieces.⁠”

Check out the answers below!

“CUMBIA! And Joe Arroyo so beautiful said, ‘del Indio tiene la fuerza, y el Negro la fortaleza, que le imprime el movimiento.’”- lauraarendonn


“Ritmos africanos combinados con tambores pre-colombinos y la flambuya y elegancia de los gitanos y corte española. Mi herencia cultural es un sabroso pozole.”- mercedesmelugutierrez

“Chamamé, vanera… – Southern Brazil. Super important to the gaucho culture that southern Brazil shares with argentina and uruguay.”- its.lilas.world

“El baile de los viejitos, Michoacán, México.”- angelyly_



“Punta!! Like ‘Sopa de Caracol.’”- laura_gamez27

“Samba — originated in Brazil from men and women ( mostly from West African region) that were enslaved by Portugal — and brought to Brazil.”- la_licorne_en_velours_

“BOMBA!!! A style of dance in Puerto Rico heavily influenced by our African roots.”-xosamanthaotero


“Festejo… “- jesthefania

“Danza.”- karifornialove

“Cueca from Chile.”- calisunchine



“Huapango Arribeño- San Luis Potosí, Mexico.”-hijxsdetonatiuh



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Mountain Dew Margaritas Are Apparently A Thing At Red Lobster Now?

Culture

Mountain Dew Margaritas Are Apparently A Thing At Red Lobster Now?

Matt Winkelmeyer / Getty

We’ve seen all kinds of takes on the timeless classic that is a Margarita. From frozen Margaritas to ones with cranberry juice and dashes of blue curaçao and twists of basil and ginger beer we’ve literally seen it all. Or so we thought.

Recently, Red Lobster announced that they’re doing a Mountain Dew-take on the beloved and salty tequila cocktail.

Red Lobster’s DEW-Garita promises to set you aglow.

The drink is the first official Mountain Dew cocktail and of course, it is bright lime green. While the cocktail’s recipe is being kept strictly under wraps, like everything at Red Lobster’s, it’s supposed to pair “perfectly” with Red Lobster’s iconic Cheddar Bay Biscuits.

“Red Lobster is thrilled to work with PepsiCo, not only because it has a great portfolio of brands, but specifically because of the food and beverage innovation possibilities,” Nelson Griffin,the Senior Vice President and Chief Supply Chain Officer at Red Lobster said in a statement about the drink.

Red Lobster’s DEW-Garita is due to debut at Red Lobster locations nationwide in September and by the end of 2020.

The Margarita is an iconic Mexican drink related to a drink called Rhe Daisy.

The classic Tequila sour cocktail is one of the most beloved cocktails in the world. According to Wine Enthusiast “One story claims that the drink was created in 1938, as Mexican restaurant owner Carlos (Danny) Herrera mixed it for gorgeous Ziegfeld showgirl Marjorie King. Supposedly, Tequila was the only alcohol that King would abide, so Herrera added lime juice and salt.”

To make your own classic Margarita check out this recipe below

Ingredients

  • Coarse salt
  • Lime wedge
  • 2 ounces white Tequila
  • 1 ounce orange liqueur
  • 1 ounce lime juice

Directions

Shake out coarse salt on a plate. Wet the rim of a glass by using the lime wedge. Press the rim of the glass in the plate of salt to coat. Add ice to the glass.

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice and add the rest of the ingredients. Shake well, and pour into the prepared glass over ice.

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