Culture

A Grocery Store Owner In Mexico Was Tired Of The Salsa He Was Selling So He Started Making His Own

One thing that no one can ever take away from us Latinos is that we know how to hustle. When we see an opportunity we take it, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Whether we were taught to sell crap at the swap meet, babysit the neighbor’s annoying kids, sell liquados from our backyard, or make cakes out of our kitchen, we know how to make a buck. That is why this next story of homemade salsas is no surprise. What is kind of shocking is that we didn’t think about selling this idea ourselves sooner, and that’s what makes this item even that more genius.

An independent Mexican grocer noticed that all the sauces he sold at his store had a ton of preservatives.

Credit: elpatohotsauce / Instagram

Juan García, the owner of Super Carnicería La 18 in the border town of Matamoros in Mexico, said the lack of authentic Mexican sauces —without preservatives — made him wonder why he couldn’t create real sauces himself. 

“Our specialty is roast meat, we have 35 years of experience in that, but we began to see that the sauces that were sold had many [preservatives],” García said in an interview with El Pais. He added that because they sell their on-demand meat on the weekends, they also prepare their own recipes to accompany the foods. He said in order to make their signature recipe, they had to buy machines to start producing their homemade sauces. 

As you know, the sauce is everything. Without an excellent sauce to put on carne asada, or tacos, or flautas, or beans, or anything, you might as well not eat at all. 

García knew his signature sauce would be delicious, but he needed a way to market the sauces in order to be unique and ensure sales.

Credit: SuperCarniceriaLa18 / Facebook

“I had to get attention,” García told the publication. Yet, the question was what could he name the sauces that would attract people? The label indicated the name of the store, La 18, and that’s not particularly special. Neither is the type of salsa. Most salsas are red, green, mild, hot, etc. 

Then, just like a stroke of lightning, at least we’d like to picture it that way, García knew exactly how he’d sell the sauces. García used his own family’s story to create the branding of the sauces. 

García knew that he wanted to make it something funny and empowering so he drew inspiration from his father’s lack of English and how he was mocked for that lack of knowledge.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

“These are words that my father said,” García told el País. “He worked some time in Brownsville, but he didn’t know any English. People laughed at him.”

García adds that the only way his father could fight back against those mocking him was to curse at them. The problem was since his English wasn’t so good, his curse words were really tough to understand, but not to Latinos! We know how to understand broken English, especially that is spoken by elder Latinos. So, without further ado, let us present each salsa in all its glory.

The salsa verde salsa is called “madafaker,” which means mother f*cker.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

Incredible, right? We’ve all heard one of our abuelos or tíos say this out loud when things just weren’t going their way.

The red sauce is called “sanababish” — in other words, son of a b*tch.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

The Spanglish spelling is utter perfection. Admit it. When you read it, you read it like an angry abuelo yelling at someone in their thick accent.

Then there’s the habanero chili sauce that is straight-up Spanish, sort of.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

That reads exactly how it’s spelled: “asupichimaye” or a su pinche madre. 

“It’s what people say when they try our habanero chili sauce, because it’s very spicy,” Garcia said. Of course, it makes perfect sense.

So if you’re wondering whether or not his unique sauce naming strategy was a success or not, just check out these comments.

Credit: Super Carniceria La 18 / Facebook

You don’t have travel all the way down to Mexico to purchase these stellar sauces, they can ship them to you! The sauces have been such a success that they produce about 500 bags of each type of sauce every week. The store itself is doing so well that García plans to open a new store in Monterrey, Mexico.

Now, the question remains, which one would you try first? We’re kind of lightweights so we’d definitely try the asupichimaye green creamy sauce. What about you? Let us know in the comment section below!

READ: This Entrepreneur Worked For Years To Sell Her Authentic Mexican Sauces To The World And It Paid Off

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Here Are 9 Salsas From Across Latin America That You’ll Carry In Your Bag Every Day Of The Week

Culture

Here Are 9 Salsas From Across Latin America That You’ll Carry In Your Bag Every Day Of The Week

I guarantee that since Beyonce’s hit anthem ‘Formation’ hit the airwaves, we’ve all been wanting to channel our inner Bey and carry some hot sauce in our bags. But which one would you choose?  

Whether you prefer sweet and sour, ranch, spicy, or mild, when it comes to options, the possibilities are endless!

A sauce’s beauty is that every country has its famous creation that usually accompanies their traditional dishes. Every Latin American country has its mouth-watering sauce that was created using recipes passed down from ancestors.

AJILIMOJILI

In Puerto Rico, this sauce is quite popular because of its ají dulce flavor – a mix of sweet and sour notes. The green salsa is the Caribbean’s version of hot sauce and is added to recipes, such as seafood and boiled vegetables.

VALENTINA

Few of us don’t know about the magic that is Valentina. Pour that sauce all over your papas, pizza, jicama, elotes, and so much more. And it’s great because it’s available in a variety of heat levels so everyone can enjoy. 

TIÁ LUPITA HABANERO SAUCE

This Habanero Hot Sauce is an original family recipe of the brand and combines just the right amount of heat with each fruit’s natural sweetness. It is handmade in small batches, using only habanero peppers, dates, mangos, and spices. All ingredients are sourced from local farms and are non-GMO and gluten-free certified.

The sauce can be used as a condiment with breakfast burritos, eggs, sandwiches, tacos, pulled pork, steak, chicken, fish, quesadillas, and more.

CHIMICHURRI

Chimichurri is mostly tied to Argentina, even though other countries also serve the herb-based salsa. To achieve the perfect chimichurri, mix parsley, oregano, garlic, onion, pepper, vinegar, and olive oil. Pair with meat cuts like churrasco and watch the magic happen.

CHIRMOL

In Central America, chismol or chirmol is made of tomatoes, onion, peppers and other ingredients. It’s similar to pico de gallo and is used in a variety of dishes.

RICANTE

Sauce, dressing, dip, marinade… Ricante does it all and with no sugar or salt added and with just the right amount of approachable spice. Ricante is not only Non-GMO, Gluten-Free, and Keto Friendly, but tiá approved!

Ricante launched with five incredibly unique hot sauces, marrying non-traditional essences like apples, mangos, carrots, and habaneros.

SALSA ROSA

Pastas are enjoyed all across Latin America, especially in Argentina and Uruguay, which pair the dishes with salsa rosa, a tomato-based sauce mixed with heavy cream. Together, they create a pink paste that blankets a variety of pasta dishes.

TACTICAL TACOS

Wait, so not all taco bases are citrus?! Tactical Tacos knows how to do taco sauce right with their notes of orange, lime, and cilantro to start your bite out just right, followed up with a perfect hint of Jalapeno and Cayenne pepper in the background. That’s just their mild sauce, Snafu. The Fire Fight and Ghost Protocol give you a similar ride with the citrus kick but with a much bigger spice hit for those that are brave enough to try it out!

MOLE

Mole is a spicy-and-sweet sauce made from chocolate that translates. The dark brown sauce gets its heat from chiles, but also has a touch of sweetness from the cacao, almonds, and peanuts often added. The sauce is topped with sesame seeds.

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A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Culture

A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Social media is where people can show off just about anything they create. This includes art in any and all media, like pancake art. Claudia, the creator behind Nappan Pancake art, is the latest artist watching their art reach the masses.

Claudia, the artist behind Nappan Pancake art, got her start because of the pandemic.

@nappancakes

casi ✨1 año✨haciendo #pancakeart 🥞 #parati #foryou #viral #trend #glowup #art #foryoupage

♬ Inox la bggg – ᗰᗩᖇIE ᗰOI ᑎᗩᖇᑌTO

The artist first started to play around with pancake art last spring break when the pandemic forced businesses and schools to close. Claudia wanted to get more creative with her kids’ breakfasts since they were now always at home.

“I started experimenting with making Pancake art,” Claudia recalls to mitú. “At first I only used the color of the natural dough and a little cocoa. At first, I just used the ketchup dispensers and little by little I learned.”

Claudia uses her pancake art to honor some truly iconic people.

@nappancakes

Responder a @detodoun_poco233 Cepillín ✨🥞✨ en nuestros ♥️ #parati #fy #HijosAdopTiktoks #adoptiktoks #viral #foryou @cepillintv #pancakeart ncakeart

♬ La Feria de Cepillin – Cepillín

Cepillín recently died and the loss was felt throughout the community. He made our lives joyous and fun with his music, especially his birthday song. Some of the creations are done for fans who request to see their faves turned into delicious pancake art.

The artist loves creating the edible works of art.

The journey of becoming a pancake artist has been a fun adventure for Claudia and her children. The more she has practiced, the more she has been able to do.

“Sometimes I scream with excitement and I go to all the members of my house to see it,” Claudia says about her successes. “Other times it’s just a feeling like “disappointment could be better” other times it just breaks or burns and then I just cry but it usually feels very satisfying.”

You can check out all of her creations on TikTok.

@nappancakes

Responder a @reyna100804santoyo siii🥞✨ díganle que me adopte 🥺 @ederbez #adoptiktoks #hijosadoptiktoks #parati #foryou #viral #fy #art #pancakeart

♬ Little Bitty Pretty One – Thurston Harris

With 350,000 followers and growing, it won’t be long until more people start to fully enjoy Claudia’s art. Her children can’t get enough of it and she is so excited to share it with the rest of the world.

READ: Spicy Food Lovers Have Reason To Celebrate As New Study Says Eating Chilies Could Be Secret To Longevity

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