Culture

If I Lived In One Of These 12 Mexican Towns With Strange Names I’d Move Immediately

Sometimes, it’s fun to take advantage of someone else’s inability to speak Spanish. It is a romance language after all. So when my mom would tell her white friends, “de nalga” instead of “de nada,” nobody noticed except us.

If you’re from any of these towns, we bet your non-Latino friends just nod and say, “Nice!” But we all know you’re from the land of the boogers. Here are the weirdest places in Mexico to say you’re from.

1. Villa Mocos

@MiPetitMadrid / Twitter

Everyone loves to talk about Villa Mocos, but it’s a myth! Maybe our moms were playing pranks on the gabachos, and it’s infiltrated our impressionable young minds. Don’t believe anyone who tells you they’re from Villa Mocos.

2. Las Nalga de Ventura, Guanajuato

@tioironhomie / Twitter

The full name is Rancho de Guadalupe (La Nalga de Ventura) which directly translates to Guadalupe’s Ranch (Fortune’s Butt). There are only 217 inhabitants that can say they’re from Ventura’s Butt.

3. Salsipuedes, Baja California

@ViewDownHere / Twitter

Pero, really, “leave if you can”. Apparently, the secluded beaches you might choose to relax on in Salsipuedes are often interrupted by major wave breaks. Surfers love to go and enjoy it y salsipuede.

4. Delicias, Chihuahua

@PaseaPerrosCom / Twitter

Literally translated to “Delights, Mexico,” this is what we’d expect to see. The city is the fourth most populated in the state of Chihuahua and is actually a major agricultural center. 

5. Comitán, Chiapas

@josielynn__v

Waiting for your friends or S.O. to commit already? Buy them a one way ticket to Comitán, which is translated to “Commit!” 

6. Ojo de Agua, Tecámac

@BricRealEstate / Twitter

How can you visualize el ojo de aqua? Through the eye of Mother Nature, it might be a spring. There’s no confirmation on how the town got its name, but it’s as good a hunch as any.

7. Aguascalientes, Mexico

@muratnebiayhan / Twitter

This state of Mexico directly translates to “Hot Waters.” It’s not because everyone is feeling like this frog, but because there are so many hot springs in the area. Still–“Hi, I’m from Hot Waters,” feels like a silly thing to say in English, and beautiful in Spanish.

8. Pachuca, Mexico

@Love99270707 / Twitter

There is no official consensus on how the coastal town got its name. It might have originated from the word pachoa, which means strait; pachoacan which means place of silver and gold; or patlachuican which means place of tears.

9. Paso del Macho, Veracruz

@luismartinulloa / Twitter

Directly translated to “Male’s Path,” apparently this municipality was named after the treacherous journey to enter the area. You needed mules or dudes to carry the load.

10. La Barca, Jalisco

@wfp_mozambique / Twitter

Originally named Santa Mónica de la Barca, it eventually just became known as La Barca. That’s like if your home town’s name was “The Boat.” This one is less weird than it is just straight unimaginative.

11. Cortazar, Guanajuato

@superpetmate1 / Twitter

Home of the best hair dressers in the world, Cortazar… okay just kidding. It was first known as San José de los Amoles, but for some reason, it became known as Cortazar, which means ‘to cut.’

12. Chihuahua, Mexico

@LunaPrincess / Twitter

Probably the most annoying place to be from if you’ve moved anywhere else in the world is Chihuahua, Mexico. To the rest of the world, it translates to “Tiny Dog, Mexico.”

At least nobody can be from Isla del Malpelo, Colombia.

@tiktokgrassi / Twitter

It’s just a deserted island that could only be used for climbing it’s barren rock and jumping into the ocean. It also promises for a bad hair day. Badhair Island is a favorite for scuba divers and scientists but that’s about it.

READ: 13 Super Affordable Cities In Latin America To Travel On A Budget

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Viva Mexico Is Trending On Twitter Proving That Mexico Is More Than Just A Country

Culture

Viva Mexico Is Trending On Twitter Proving That Mexico Is More Than Just A Country

Carlos Vivas / Getty Images

It is Mexico’s Independence Day and that means that Mexicans around the world are honoring their roots. Twitter is buzzing with people who might not be in Mexico but they will forever have Mexico in their hearts. Here are just a few of the loving messages from people who are Mexican through and through.

Viva Mexico is trending on social media and the tweets are filled with love and passion for the country.

Mexico received its independence from Spain on September 16, 1810 and since then the day has been marked with celebration. The day is marked with parties of pride and culture no matter where you are in the world.

Mexicans everywhere are letting their Mexican flag fly.

Tbh, who doesn’t want to be Mexican to enjoy the day of puro pinche pride? The celebration for Mexican Independence Day starts on Sept. 15 with El Grito. The tradition is that the president of Mexico stands on the balcony on Sept. 15 at 11 p.m. and rings the same church bell that Roman Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla rang in 1810 to trigger the Mexican Revolution.

People are loving all of the celebrations for their homeland.

The original El Grito took place in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato in 1810. While most El Grito celebrations take place at the National Palace, some presidents, especially on their last year, celebrate El Grito in the town where it originated.

Honestly, no one celebrates their independence day like Mexico and we love them for it.

¡Viva Mexico! Mexico lindo y querido. How are you celebrating the Mexican Independence Day this year? Show us what you have planned.

READ: Many Mexicans Are Calling Out Fragile Masculinity As Some Continue To Protest A Controversial Zapata Painting

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Volunteer Firefighters From Mexico Went to Oregon to Help Their “Sister City” Contain the Unprecedented Fires

Things That Matter

Volunteer Firefighters From Mexico Went to Oregon to Help Their “Sister City” Contain the Unprecedented Fires

Just when you thought humanity has failed us, someone steps up and shows the world that the generosity of the human spirit is alive and well. 

Last week, a post on Reddit went viral of a group of volunteer firefighters from Guanajuato, Mexico who traveled to the city of Ashland, Oregon to help fight the wildfires that are blazing across the western state.

The fire department is called Heroico Cuerpo de Bomberos Voluntarios, the Heroic Volunteer Fire Department, in English.

The two towns have had a “sister city” relationship for over 50 years. Sister-city relationships are meant to “promote peace and understanding through exchanges that focus on arts and culture, youth and education, business and trade, and community development”.

The internet swiftly erupted into comments praising the volunteer firefighters for their bravery and comradery. “Mexico also sent relief during Katrina. Mexico and Canada are our best allies, always there for us regardless of the politics,” one commenter said. Another chimed in: “Welcome to Oregon, amigos. Mantenga una bota en el quemado.”

The troop of men who traveled from Mexico to the United States were identified as Captain Aldo Iván Ruiz, Captain Juan Armando Alvarez Villegas, Sargent Jorge Luis Anguiano Jasso, Sargent Luis Alfonso Campos Martínez and Miguel Ángel Hernández Lara. They were accompanied by the mayor of Guanajuato, Alejandro Navarro.

“We began the relief work,” Navarro wrote on Twitter. “Very moved by the terrible impact of the fire on families and their homes.”

The Oregon wildfires are just one of the many that are blazing down the West Coast of the United States, taking people’s homes, land, and sometimes, their lives. In more than 1 million acres have burned and two dozen fires are still raging.

“Almost every year since becoming governor, I’ve witnessed historic fire seasons,” Oregon Governor Kate Brown recently said at a press conference. “Yet this is proving to be an unprecedented and significant fire event for our state.”

Experts are hypothesizing that these unprecedented fires are further evidence of the toll man-made climate change is having on the environment. 

via Getty Images

“I can’t think of any time over the last 100 years where we’ve had serial fire outbreaks, four years running,” said fire historian Stephen Pyne to the Washington Post. “That I can find no record of happening before,” he added. “That is the big switch; that is the phase change.”

Regardless of what has caused the fires, the bravery of these firefighters is worth commendable. Their actions are further proof that borders cannot contain the universal values of kindness, altruism, and brotherhood.

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