Culture

If I Lived In One Of These 12 Mexican Towns With Strange Names I’d Move Immediately

Sometimes, it’s fun to take advantage of someone else’s inability to speak Spanish. It is a romance language after all. So when my mom would tell her white friends, “de nalga” instead of “de nada,” nobody noticed except us.

If you’re from any of these towns, we bet your non-Latino friends just nod and say, “Nice!” But we all know you’re from the land of the boogers. Here are the weirdest places in Mexico to say you’re from.

1. Villa Mocos

@MiPetitMadrid / Twitter

Everyone loves to talk about Villa Mocos, but it’s a myth! Maybe our moms were playing pranks on the gabachos, and it’s infiltrated our impressionable young minds. Don’t believe anyone who tells you they’re from Villa Mocos.

2. Las Nalga de Ventura, Guanajuato

@tioironhomie / Twitter

The full name is Rancho de Guadalupe (La Nalga de Ventura) which directly translates to Guadalupe’s Ranch (Fortune’s Butt). There are only 217 inhabitants that can say they’re from Ventura’s Butt.

3. Salsipuedes, Baja California

@ViewDownHere / Twitter

Pero, really, “leave if you can”. Apparently, the secluded beaches you might choose to relax on in Salsipuedes are often interrupted by major wave breaks. Surfers love to go and enjoy it y salsipuede.

4. Delicias, Chihuahua

@PaseaPerrosCom / Twitter

Literally translated to “Delights, Mexico,” this is what we’d expect to see. The city is the fourth most populated in the state of Chihuahua and is actually a major agricultural center. 

5. Comitán, Chiapas

@josielynn__v

Waiting for your friends or S.O. to commit already? Buy them a one way ticket to Comitán, which is translated to “Commit!” 

6. Ojo de Agua, Tecámac

@BricRealEstate / Twitter

How can you visualize el ojo de aqua? Through the eye of Mother Nature, it might be a spring. There’s no confirmation on how the town got its name, but it’s as good a hunch as any.

7. Aguascalientes, Mexico

@muratnebiayhan / Twitter

This state of Mexico directly translates to “Hot Waters.” It’s not because everyone is feeling like this frog, but because there are so many hot springs in the area. Still–“Hi, I’m from Hot Waters,” feels like a silly thing to say in English, and beautiful in Spanish.

8. Pachuca, Mexico

@Love99270707 / Twitter

There is no official consensus on how the coastal town got its name. It might have originated from the word pachoa, which means strait; pachoacan which means place of silver and gold; or patlachuican which means place of tears.

9. Paso del Macho, Veracruz

@luismartinulloa / Twitter

Directly translated to “Male’s Path,” apparently this municipality was named after the treacherous journey to enter the area. You needed mules or dudes to carry the load.

10. La Barca, Jalisco

@wfp_mozambique / Twitter

Originally named Santa Mónica de la Barca, it eventually just became known as La Barca. That’s like if your home town’s name was “The Boat.” This one is less weird than it is just straight unimaginative.

11. Cortazar, Guanajuato

@superpetmate1 / Twitter

Home of the best hair dressers in the world, Cortazar… okay just kidding. It was first known as San José de los Amoles, but for some reason, it became known as Cortazar, which means ‘to cut.’

12. Chihuahua, Mexico

@LunaPrincess / Twitter

Probably the most annoying place to be from if you’ve moved anywhere else in the world is Chihuahua, Mexico. To the rest of the world, it translates to “Tiny Dog, Mexico.”

At least nobody can be from Isla del Malpelo, Colombia.

@tiktokgrassi / Twitter

It’s just a deserted island that could only be used for climbing it’s barren rock and jumping into the ocean. It also promises for a bad hair day. Badhair Island is a favorite for scuba divers and scientists but that’s about it.

READ: 13 Super Affordable Cities In Latin America To Travel On A Budget

Someone Claims That They Discovered A Long-Lost Frida Kahlo Painting But Experts Don’t Agree

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Someone Claims That They Discovered A Long-Lost Frida Kahlo Painting But Experts Don’t Agree

Frida Kahlo - La Mesa Herida - The wounded Table - Der verwundete Tisch / YouTube

Frida Kahlo is one of the most iconic artists in global history. The Mexican artist was known for blazing her own path both in art and in society. One of her most famous paintings “The Wounded Table” has been missing for 65 years but one art dealer claims he found it.

A Spanish art dealer claims to have found a long-lost Frida Kahlo painting.

Kahlo painted “The Wounded Table” in 1940 and over the years it disappeared. It is unknown if it was returned to Moscow, was lost, or destroyed. All that is known is that Kahlo’s largest painting to that date is gone.

Cristian López Márquez, a little known art dealer in Spain, claims to have found the long-lost and highly sought after painting. According to La Voz de Galicia, the art dealers claims to have acquired the painting from some who settled in Spain from Mexico.

The painting is one of Kahlo’s most famous works of art.

The decades-long mystery about where the painting ended up does add to the allure of the claim. However, people are not convinced that the painting is a fake that is being peddled by someone who is after money by selling an inauthentic painting. To make matters more skeptical, the art dealer has very few details but is adamant about its authenticity.

“Time will give us the truth,” Márquez told AP. “Whoever proves genuine interest and the ability to pay the figure of 40 million euros, can spend as much time as wanted with their experts analyzing the work.”

Despite Márquez’s claims, art historians are very skeptical that the painting is true.

Márquez claims to have the painting safe in a warehouse in London. He has put the painting on sale asking for $45 million. No one seems to be biting but Márquez continues to say the painting is an original.

READ: Frida Kahlo’s Casa Azul Is Celebrating Her 113th Birthday With A Week Full Of Digital Events

Mexico Closes Border With Arizona To Keep Americans Out Following COVID-19 Outbreak

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Mexico Closes Border With Arizona To Keep Americans Out Following COVID-19 Outbreak

John Moore / Getty Images

Mexico is taking measures to protect its citizens from the rapidly spreading COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S. Parts of the Mexico-U.S. border was closed in Arizona by Mexican authorities in response to the Trump administration’s response to COVID-19.

It started when the state of Sonora toughened border restrictions as Arizona’s COVID-19 number skyrocketed.

Arizona is facing one of the toughest COVID-19 surges in the country. Numbers are spiking across the U.S. following the rapid, and in some states sudden, reopenings. Florida, Texas, California, and Arizona are all reporting numbers that have health experts concerned about the outlook of the U.S.’s ability to control the virus.

“We are all going to be on alert at this time to prevent them from coming, whether they are Mexicans living in the U.S., Americans or those who want to come to spend the weekend and put a greater burden on us regarding COVID,” Sonora Gov. Claudia Pavlovich told the Arizona Daily Star.

Some Mexican citizens took it upon themselves to block Americans from entering their country.

Mexican residents along the Arizona border created makeshift blockades to keep Americans from flooding popular beach destinations. Mexican citizens used their cars and other objects to block Americans as the state governments backed their actions.

“We invite US tourists not to visit Mexico,” Sonoyta’s mayor, José Ramos Arzate, said in a statement. “We agreed on this to safeguard the health of our community in the face of an accelerated rate of Covid-19 contagion in the neighboring state of Arizona.”

Sonoyta is a U.S.-Mexico border town with roads that lead to Puerto Peñasco, a beach town on the Sea of Cortés. Mexicans are fighting to protect their own health as the U.S. continues to let the COVID-19 crisis get worse.

The United States has been setting daily records as COVID-19 infections continue to spread out of control. Health experts are warning that the U.S. is still in the first wave of the virus since the first wave never ended. The lack of containment has led to countries banning American tourists because the virus is still not under control.

There are things we can do to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Health experts suggest wearing a mask, practicing social distancing, and being diligent about hygiene to slow the spread of the virus. Stay safe and stay healthy.

READ: Gay Man Dubbed Karen For Saying He Wants Everyone To Catch COVID In IG Video