Culture

Video: This Is How People Reacted When They Heard A White Mom Tell Her Adopted Latina Daughter To Speak English

It seems like every other day there’s a new viral video of an old Trump supporter or a young white bro telling a Latinx person in the US to stop speaking Spanish. Recently, two elder women angrily ordered a Puerto Rican manager of a Central Florida Burger King to go back to Mexico when they overheard him speaking Spanish in a private conversation, while two Mexican-American women were detained by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection just for speaking Spanish at a Montana supermarket. The xenophobic and racist attacks, both verbal and physical, have made many feel like it’s dangerous to speak their own tongue or like an outcast for communicating to their parents or grandparents in the only language they know.

The English-only movement has further divided a country, with those ignited by the bigotry of the Trump administration unfoundedly threatened by just the sound of a person of color speaking another tongue and others who understand there is no official language in the US supporting the linguistic freedom and multiculturalism that allegedly makes the nation exceptional. 

On an episode of What Would You Do?, host John Quiñones confronts the schismatic topic. 

During the nearly 9-minute-long segment of the ABC series, a white mother tells her adopted Latina daughter to only speak Spanish and instructs her to order a hamburger instead of a traditional Latin American dish. Using hidden cameras to record the very common, but in this case staged, scenario, viewers get a peak of how ordinary people behave when they witness dilemmas that either compel them to intervene or mind their own business.

During the segment, Michele, the mother, and Isabella, the daughter, are grabbing a bite at a diner in Orangeburg, New York. The child asks the Latina waitress for arroz con leche, to which her mother responds, “Isabella, stop speaking Spanish. You’re American. That is not your language. What is wrong with you?” The first person to overhear, an elder white teacher, engages with the duo, telling Michele she doesn’t think she’s going about the situation “in the right way.” 

“She should be proud of her Spanish language, not to be made to feel like she’s doing something wrong,” she tells the mother. Later, she even advises the mom to learn Spanish and tells the young girl that Spanish is a beautiful language.

When Quiñones, himself a Texas-born Mexican-American, reveals his crew and asks why the woman intervened, she responded, “When it comes to children, I go from a mouse to a lion. I just don’t like anybody taking advantage of a child.”

In another scene, Isabela asks for arroz con pollo. Michele, visibly upset, scolds the girl. “Isabella, in English,” she demands. “I brought you here to give you a better life, and I want you to speak American.

This time, another teacher in a nearby table overhears and decides to offer Michele a quick lesson — in patience.

ABC

When Michele stresses that she just wants her daughter to speak English because they’re in the US, the teacher sympathizes with her. “I know. I’m a teacher, and I get it. But you’re not going to get anywhere demanding it, and you can’t get frustrated by it.”

She then turns to the girl and attempts to rationalize her mother’s actions. When Isabela asks the woman “do you think it’s wrong to speak Spanish,” she replies, “Not to mommy, because mommy doesn’t understand that. It’s good manners if you are with other people that don’t speak it, to speak English.”

When Quiñones pops out and confronts the patron, he asks her why she didn’t flat-out tell the mother she was wrong. The woman, who noted that Michele would have had better results honoring rather than attacking her daughter’s native tongue, said she was “getting very frustrated” and “was thinking maybe it was very bad,” but doesn’t know why she didn’t challenge Michele more on it.

In the next case, it’s a Puerto Rican diner who overhears the conversation. Not immediately making any comment, when Michele steps away, Isabela engages with the patron, who informs her she, too, speaks Spanish. “Yo hablo español,” she says, before asking if the young girl likes living in the US. “That’s good that somebody loving adopted you,” she says.

When Michele returned, she asks the woman if she agrees that her daughter should be speaking English instead of Spanish, to which she responds yes. At that moment, her partner, a white man, appears puzzled and chimes in: “You speak Spanish,” he tells his girlfriend. “I don’t make you speak English.” He then reacts to Michele, saying, “She [his girlfriend] speaks Spanish whenever she wants, and there’s nothing wrong with that.”

When Quiñones comes out, he asks why the couple reacted the way they did. The boyfriend didn’t agree with the mother, explaining, “that’s who she is. That’s part of her identity.” As for the girlfriend, who was more sympathetic to the mom, she disclosed the discrimination she and her family experienced as Latinas in their predominately white neighborhood speaking Spanish and hoped the girl wouldn’t share her same fate. “I was a little annoyed in a way,” she said, “… but I’ve dealt with that.” She continued: “my mother spoke no English, and I had many fights when I was a teenager, people who would make fun a lot of times.”

Finally, in the last performance, it’s a white woman who is married to a Greek immigrant who is shaken by the confrontation. Angry by the conversation she overhears, she checks in on Isabela the moment her mom steps away, asking the girl if she wants her to call someone for her own safety and soon after informing a manager of the situation and urging them to phone officials who could help the girl.

When the mother returns, the woman confronts her. 

ABC

“We’re foreigners, so I don’t really understand what you’re talking about.” After Michele responds, “I just want her to be more American,” the woman questions, “and just forget about where she came from?” She continued: “We’re from Greece. We would never forget where we come from.”

Michele suggests that it’s different because her daughter is from Mexico, to which the woman, furious, says, “so you guys don’t accept Mexicans in your family?”

She added: “This is a melting pot of thousands of different people. My husband is Greek and my kids will speak Greek.”

Quiñones, who appears in the midst of the argument, informs the patron that she is on a TV show. The woman, who says she’s glad it’s fake because she was about to punch Michele, reaffirms that the US is a country where everyone is supposed to be welcomed and could proudly speak with their language. 

Meeting the actress who played Isabela, the woman tells her, “You would have been coming home with me tonight, and you would have been speaking English, Spanish, and Greek.”

Watch the entire segment below! 

These 17 Latino Dances Were Huge At One Time And They Should Be Huge Again

Entertainment

These 17 Latino Dances Were Huge At One Time And They Should Be Huge Again

RCA / YouTube

There’s something to be said about the versatility of dance. Feeling down? Shake it off with a boogie. Feeling happy? Feel even better by tapping your feet to the beat, babes! Trying to avoid that one socially-awkward cousin at a big family bash? You guessed it – it’s time to make your way to the dance floor. We’ve put together a list of stellar latino dances for you to try at home, so you’ll never be caught unawares when you next need to show off your moves. You’re welcome.

1. La Macarena by Los del Rio

If you don’t know the Macarena, babes, you’re lacking some serious cultural education. This Spanish hit was released in 1993, and the rest was history. La Macarena is a mainstay on the wedding circuit, and it unfailingly gets everyone up out of their seats when it starts playing. Even if you don’t have a rhythmic bone in your body, it’s pretty easy to follow the steps once everyone is on their third rotation of the dance.

2. Suavemente by Elvis Crespo

Youtube / Elvis Crespo

If there is anything that is iconic about the video clip for Suavemente, it’s the clearly 90s-esque vibe it’s got going on. Elvis Crespo gave us a classic song for us to show off the best of our merengue skills. The trick is having a partner who can keep up with our fabulousness, right? Or, uh, making sure to move our hips to the music while we keep our upper body relaxed and slow-moving.

3. El Baile del Perrito by Wilfrido Vargas

Youtube / Rafael Alvarez

Considering that dogs are one of the best things in the world, it only stands to reason that The Puppy Dance is the goodest of bois. Dances. We mean dances. Wilfrido Vargas taught us all how to dance to the rhythm of a dog’s bark – and if that isn’t a worthy achievement, then we don’t know what is.

4. Hong Kong Mambo by Tito Puente

Youtube / Pedro Velazco

If your abuela doesn’t know this song, you need to find yourself a new abuelita. Okay, if her cooking makes up for it, then you can keep her around for a little longer. Anyway, the Hong Kong Mambo was literally made for dancing the mambo. In fact, the album it was released on, Dance Mania, is listed on the US’ National Recording Registry, which makes it a certified banger. 

5. Aserejé (The Ketchup Song) by Las Ketchup

Youtube / Altra Moda Music

Who could forget this absolute classic from the early 2000s? Even though no-one really knew what the lyrics were on about, that wasn’t really the point of the song. Rather, it was one hella bueno song to just swing your hips, your hands and your hair, and know that you definitely nailed it.

6. Retrato Cantado de um Amor by Reinaldo

But what if you’re in the mood to do a classic samba? Don’t worry babes, Reinaldo’s got you covered. This hit from Rio de Janeiro is played without fail at Carnival, so you better brush up on the samba before you go!

7. Payaso del Rodeo by Caballo Dorado

Youtube / Fernando Solis vevo

Caballo Dorado’s Payaso del Rodeo starts out like your typical box-step kinda tune – think along the lines of Billy Ray Cyrus’ “Achy Breaky Heart.” But don’t be fooled, since the song speeds up and will have you sweating by the end of it!

8. La Chona by Los Tucanes de Tijuana

Youtube / LosTuncanesTV

You know when the party starts to die down, and everyone’s taking a breather? Well, La Chona’s the song that gets everyone back on the dance floor again, ready to tackle the quebradita!

9. Lambada by Kaoma

Youtube / ClubMusic80s

Even though Kaoma is a French group, they released their catchy song, Lambada, in Portuguese in honor of the dance style found in Brazil! It’s characterized by real fast, swaying hip movements, which were only accentuated by 90s fashion when the song was released.

10. Mi Cucu by La Sonora Dinamita

Youtube / Sabor Latino

So, this isn’t necessarily the fastest song in the playbook when it comes to putting together a Saturday night playlist. But, does that make it any less fun to dance along to? No, no it does not. Slow twirls are the way to go with this one. And it least it gives you some time to catch your breath!

11. La Bomba by Azul Azul

Youtube / amomibolivia

You put your hand on your head, and then your hand on your hips. And if it looks like “this,” then you’re doing it right – wait, wrong song. Anyway, if you do as the man says, you can’t go wrong with La Bomba.

12. La Bala by Los Hermanos Flores

Youtube / beyblademetal33

If you wondering what song you’ll be dancing your next cumbia to, it’ll probably be Los Hermanos Flores’ La Bala. This El Salvadoran band gave us the perfect melody for placing your hand on your stomach, and then rubbing it. And yes, you’ll look like you’re hungry. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, if you’ve been eyeing off the guac – hopefully someone will take pity on you and save some for later.

13. 1, 2, 3 by El Símbolo-TNN

Youtube / MUNICIPIOPC

This Argentinian hit is nice and easy – to be honest, it’s a great way to get the party started. The dance goes like so: everyone to the bottom, everyone to the top, then get close to your dance partner and shake it off. 

14. Sopa de Caracol by Banda Blanca

Youtube / viejoteca tropical bailable

It’s electro, it’s got horns, and it’s got unintelligible lyrics – it’s perfect! While the original music video had everyone shaking their hips to beat, you could probably get away with almost anything when it comes to Sopa de Caracol. This is your time to shine, babe.

15. Oy Como Va by Celia Cruz

Youtube / CeliaCruzVEVO

The cha-cha is a great excuse to get close to your dance partner and have some fun! Especially since there’s something real sexy about swinging your hips and shuffling your feet quickly in time to a fast beat. And so, Celia Cruz’s Oy Como Va is the perfect song to get those cha-cha-cha vibes going!

16. El Vanao by Los Cantantes

Youtube / TioTeo

This is the best song for letting your weird shine through. And it’s the best song for everyone else to get their weird on, too. If you’re not putting your fingers to your head in a mock-horn fashion, then you’re doing it wrong. After all, the point of it is to look like the music video! The original featured the artists dressed as deers, while remixes since have had computer-generated horns coming out of people’s heads. Yeah. Wow.

17. Za Za Za by DJ Oscar Lobo and Grupo Climax

Youtube / juanitollego

This song will have you clapping. Seriously! The true way to get into this song is by singing “mesa mesa” at the top of your lungs, and clapping along to the beat. That’s what makes it such a classic at quinceaneras.

So, which dance is your favorite? Let us know on our Facebook page – you can find it by clicking on the logo at the top of the page. 

Julian Castro’s Mom Gave Serious Wisdom About The Racism Latinos Face Today

Things That Matter

Julian Castro’s Mom Gave Serious Wisdom About The Racism Latinos Face Today

When discussing today’s volatile state of our country, the racism, the violence, the injustice, people often say “it’s never been this bad.”

How do we truly know for sure that something we are experiencing today, as a minority, as Latinos, is something, unlike anything previous generations have experienced before. We certainly cannot tell from history books mainly because history books often omit the Latino experience altogether. We sometimes only have oral histories to rely on. The stories elder Latinos share with us about what life was like in the past, before social media, before cell phones, and before the media ever reported about injustices against our community. 

Those special individuals are typically our grandparents, tias, la vecina, and more importantly activists that continue to fight for the cause today. Recently presidential candidate, Julian Castro said that he stands on his important platforms today primarily because of his mother Rosie. 

As a lifelong Texan, Rosie said the racism in 2019 is more evil than anything she has ever seen.

Credit: Instagram/@TexasMonthly

In an interview with NBC News, Rosie who’s not only grown up in Texas but has also worked her adult life as an activist for Latinos said that she knows racism well because she has lived through it her entire life but what is happening today is extremely different from the past. 

“When I was in the movement, I knew the racism was out there and it was institutional. This kind of racism is different,” she said to the network. “That rhetoric has gone on for three years now, and I think we’ve all seen the rise of the hate groups and then even the rise of just ordinary people in a store that feel empowered to say something to a person who is speaking Spanish or is dark-skinned.”

Rosie said the racist words from President Donald Trump has single-handly inspired white supremacists to target Latinos. 

Credit: Twitter/@thehill

She said he is the catalyst to our current crisis.

Rosie said that when Trump first got elected she immediately felt like she was back in time, as if it were the ’60s all over again, but adds that this time it feels much worse. She said back then, President Nixon and California Governor Ronald Reagan had a campaign against Latinos too. However, it does not compare to the injustices against Latinos today. She points out that Trump claims to be a Christian yet can spew such vile words. “He’s just allowed that to become a blatant racist part of our reality,” Rosie said. 

As a former community organizer in the ’60s and ’70s, Rosie said Latinos had a mission to work at making the country a better place.

Credit: Instagram/@TexasMonthly

Now, Rosie said that Latinos are fighting for their lives. She also attributes a huge difference between then now on gun violence. Children today are afraid to go to school because mass shootings happen so frequently. 

Her son has always had a strong position against guns. He has spoken about it extensively during his presidential campaigning. Julian has said he will push for renewing the assault weapons ban, as well as limiting high-capacity magazines and, naturally, requiring background checks.

One thing that is inspiring Rosie — aside from her son running for president — is that so many organizations today are rising up to fight for equality and against racism.

Credit: Instagram/@denisemhdz

Rosie said the organizations she sees today does remind her of her time as an activist back in the day. While the injustices and crimes against Latinos is a stark difference, one thing that feels familiar is the energy from young Latinos rising together. 

Rosie has long been credited for influencing her sons’ work as public servants, to fight for Latinos and all people in the U.S. 

Credit: Instagram/@truth_purpose

Both Julian and Joaquin had attributed their rise in politics to their mother. It was her work as an activist and in education that made them both want to strive to make the United States a better place to live. 

In 2012, Julian gave his now-famous keynote address at the Democratic National Convention where he introduced then-President Barack Obama. In a few words, Julian not only paid tribute to the women in his life but also the American Dream that they worked so hard for. 

“My grandmother never owned a house,” Julian said back then. “She cleaned other people’s houses so she could afford to rent her own. But she saw her daughter become the first in her family to graduate from college. And my mother fought hard for civil rights so that instead of a mop, I could hold this microphone.”

It is because of women like Rosie that we have a platform to stand on as well. 

READ: Julián Castro Walked Onstage To Selena, Struggles With Spanish, And Other Ways He Lives The Latino Experience On The Campaign Trail

Paid Promoted Stories