Culture

This Is The Only 3-Year-Old On The Planet Who’d Want A Birthday Themed After This Mexican Doctor And It’s The Purest Thing We’ve Ever Seen

When Julián Kalev from La Paz, Mexico was turning 3 years old his family knew exactly what to get him: a Dr. Simi-themed birthday party. You only get a single third birthday in life and little Julián was living his best life dressed as a Dr. Simito, the mascot of the popular Mexican pharmacy chain Farmacias Similares. 

The tiny toddler wore a white inflatable suit with a black tie and a blue cape. Then he got down with his bad self to some dance music — this is exactly how I imagine most 3-year-olds get turned up. 

Julián has a ton of stans now.

When Julián’s father, Julio César Mendoza Carachure, shared the video on Facebook the clip went viral. The video received over 7.5 million views (your faves could never) and over 45,000 shares. Let’s be real, this video is cute as hell. There is nothing more adorable than the cherubic cheeks of a tiny tot, but the inflatable suit is what sent me over the edge. The cuteness levels have my fingers sweating all over the mouse — I can’t hit share quick enough. The people need to see Dr. Simito. 

Carachure gave his son a few options for the theme including Mickey Mouse, Spider-man, and the Minions, but Julián was like, no, I have to do this for the culture (I mean, that’s what I imagine this three-year-old said). 

This is about legacy, baby!

If you find yourself outside of a Farmacias Similares in Mexico, you might notice a Dr. Simi mascot dancing to reggaetón. It is not uncommon for children (and adults, let’s be real) to stop and dance with the cultural icon. If you search “Dr. Simi” on YouTube you’ll find tons of videos of people hanging with the mascot. He is a man of the people and with a slogan like, “The same only cheaper,” it’s no freaking wonder. Yes, I want a discounted Bugatti. Oh, you only sell medicine here? Well, you should have started with that. 

Dr. Simi is a larger-than-life pharmacist with a massive grey mustache and caterpillar eyebrows. The first Farmacias Similares was founded in 1997 by Don Víctor González Torres to provide low-cost medications to Mexican consumers. There are now over 6,000 locations across Mexico and Chile. 

Yes, Dr. Simi did the Harlem Shake.

Picture it: Dr. Simi dressed as an orchestra conductor. Dr. Simi in a diaper. Dr. Simi as a pirate. Dr. Simi as a firefighter. Then you hear it, “Con los terroristas!” No, you’re not in hell, it’s 2013 and the “Harlem Shake” is the best thing that ever happened to you and your family. Obama is President and there’s a hot new singer who sounds eerily like Mariah Carey named Ariana Grande. Is she Latinx, you wonder, she sure looks like it… Only time will tell. 

We must protect Julián at all costs.

Posted by Julio Cesar Mendoza Carachure on Sunday, August 12, 2018

There aren’t a lot of kids in this social media-obsessed world that would cop to stanning a pharmacy mascot. All kids want these days is Kylie Jenner lip kits, homemade slime, and a Green New Deal, according to the internet memes I see on Tumblr. Shout out to Julián for living his truth. Although I proudly went through a hardcore Tweety Bird and Looney Tunes phase in elementary school, I was never rewarded with a dope, viral theme party. 

Secondly, shout out to his mother, Viridiana Sicairos, who made him this costume for his birthday. The only thing my mom ever made me was a purse out of an old pair of jeans that was exactly as uncool as you imagine. This family was stoked to make little Julián happy for his big 3 and I can’t think of anything sweeter than that. May every one of Julián’s birthdays be as insanely specific and fun as this one. We could all use some joy this pure.  

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A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

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Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

Things That Matter

Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

JiromyXool / Facebook

Few days are as important or as celebrated as a teenager’s 15th birthday. So imagine the level of selflessness one must have to be able to say ‘no, I don’t want any of the celebration, I rather help out my community.’

Well, one teen in Merida, Mexico did just that this week when she told her family ‘thanks, but no thanks’ to her big quince and instead used the money that had been raised for her special day to help out her neighbors who have been impacted by the Coronavirus pandemic.

Her party was canceled thanks to Coronavirus, so she decided to help out those less fortunate.

In many countries across Latin America, the quinceañera is a huge milestone for teenagers. Beautiful dresses, visits from the entire family, big parties, and the best gifts are the norm at most quinces. But for 15-year-old Jiromy Xool Pech, instead of spending money on a lavish birthday celebration, she opted to use her party funds to help feed the needy.

Jiromy and her family had long planned her quinceañera – she had been looking forward to it for years. But with the pandemic hitting her community in Mérida particularly hard, the teen decided to put the party aside and use everything that had been invested in the ceremony to help her neighbors who have been impacted by the pandemic.

“Instead of partying, I prefer to give food to people, to help them with that,” Jiromy told El Universal. Jiromy not only asked to donate the money for her quince to the community, but she was also out there helping distribute the food to her neighbors.

Jiromy and her family weren’t alone in helping out the community either. Much of the food that was given out was prepared from by neighbors and local businesses that came to join Jiromy’s cause once word began to spread.

Unfortunately, many quinceañeras have been canceled or postponed thanks to the Coronavirus pandemic.

Credit: Diego Sanchez / Getty Images

One of Mexico City’s most famous markets for buying quince dresses – el Mercado Lagunilla – has been closed for three months. This ins’t just hating a major impact on dressmakers and salespeople, but it also means that young teens aren’t able to buy the dresses to celebrate their big day.

But not all is completely lost: there are those who have begun to return, like Ximena González, who came with her family to try on dresses. Her quince was scheduled for May 16, but the pandemic changed everything, and now they expect it to take place in November.

“I was scared and upset but I had to accept it. Some friends can no longer go because they are moving,” she told El Universal. She added, “I hope that when it is my party the infections have gone down and that everything is done as if nothing had happened.”

Mexico has been hit particularly hard by the pandemic, including Jiromy’s hometown of Merida.

Jiromy’s selfless act to help her community comes as Mexico continues to see record breaking numbers of cases. Tens of thousands are dying and even more are losing their jobs and being forced back into poverty.

As of August 6, Mexico has more than 456,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 49,698 people have died from the virus. In Jiromy’s state of Yucatan, there have been more than 10,000 cases of the virus and it’s had a huge impact on tourism, which is a major economic force in the state. Therefore, it makes sense that the 15-year-old thought it was important to use the money raised for her party to help those who are suffering financially.

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