Culture

This Is The Only 3-Year-Old On The Planet Who’d Want A Birthday Themed After This Mexican Doctor And It’s The Purest Thing We’ve Ever Seen

@tonayantears / Twitter

When Julián Kalev from La Paz, Mexico was turning 3 years old his family knew exactly what to get him: a Dr. Simi-themed birthday party. You only get a single third birthday in life and little Julián was living his best life dressed as a Dr. Simito, the mascot of the popular Mexican pharmacy chain Farmacias Similares. 

The tiny toddler wore a white inflatable suit with a black tie and a blue cape. Then he got down with his bad self to some dance music — this is exactly how I imagine most 3-year-olds get turned up. 

Julián has a ton of stans now.

When Julián’s father, Julio César Mendoza Carachure, shared the video on Facebook the clip went viral. The video received over 7.5 million views (your faves could never) and over 45,000 shares. Let’s be real, this video is cute as hell. There is nothing more adorable than the cherubic cheeks of a tiny tot, but the inflatable suit is what sent me over the edge. The cuteness levels have my fingers sweating all over the mouse — I can’t hit share quick enough. The people need to see Dr. Simito. 

Carachure gave his son a few options for the theme including Mickey Mouse, Spider-man, and the Minions, but Julián was like, no, I have to do this for the culture (I mean, that’s what I imagine this three-year-old said). 

This is about legacy, baby!

If you find yourself outside of a Farmacias Similares in Mexico, you might notice a Dr. Simi mascot dancing to reggaetón. It is not uncommon for children (and adults, let’s be real) to stop and dance with the cultural icon. If you search “Dr. Simi” on YouTube you’ll find tons of videos of people hanging with the mascot. He is a man of the people and with a slogan like, “The same only cheaper,” it’s no freaking wonder. Yes, I want a discounted Bugatti. Oh, you only sell medicine here? Well, you should have started with that. 

Dr. Simi is a larger-than-life pharmacist with a massive grey mustache and caterpillar eyebrows. The first Farmacias Similares was founded in 1997 by Don Víctor González Torres to provide low-cost medications to Mexican consumers. There are now over 6,000 locations across Mexico and Chile. 

Yes, Dr. Simi did the Harlem Shake.

Picture it: Dr. Simi dressed as an orchestra conductor. Dr. Simi in a diaper. Dr. Simi as a pirate. Dr. Simi as a firefighter. Then you hear it, “Con los terroristas!” No, you’re not in hell, it’s 2013 and the “Harlem Shake” is the best thing that ever happened to you and your family. Obama is President and there’s a hot new singer who sounds eerily like Mariah Carey named Ariana Grande. Is she Latinx, you wonder, she sure looks like it… Only time will tell. 

We must protect Julián at all costs.

Posted by Julio Cesar Mendoza Carachure on Sunday, August 12, 2018

There aren’t a lot of kids in this social media-obsessed world that would cop to stanning a pharmacy mascot. All kids want these days is Kylie Jenner lip kits, homemade slime, and a Green New Deal, according to the internet memes I see on Tumblr. Shout out to Julián for living his truth. Although I proudly went through a hardcore Tweety Bird and Looney Tunes phase in elementary school, I was never rewarded with a dope, viral theme party. 

Secondly, shout out to his mother, Viridiana Sicairos, who made him this costume for his birthday. The only thing my mom ever made me was a purse out of an old pair of jeans that was exactly as uncool as you imagine. This family was stoked to make little Julián happy for his big 3 and I can’t think of anything sweeter than that. May every one of Julián’s birthdays be as insanely specific and fun as this one. We could all use some joy this pure.  

We Asked Our FIERCE Readers What Strange Punishments Their Parents Gave Them as Kids and We Can’t Stop Laughing

Fierce

We Asked Our FIERCE Readers What Strange Punishments Their Parents Gave Them as Kids and We Can’t Stop Laughing

Jose Luis Pelaez Inc / Getty Images

When we look back on our childhoods, we had lots of great times. Hanging out with our primos, being spoiled by our abuelas, watching Saturday morning cartoons and dancing our hearts out at quinces are just a few of our favorite memories from growing up. However, it wasn’t always fun and games. We’d be irresponsible if we didn’t give credit to some of the hilarious ways our parents kept us in line as well. At the time, some threats were straight-up horrifying but now they’re pretty funny. Who knows, maybe we’ll even use some of these lines on our own kids one day. 

With these strange and funny punishments in mind, we asked our FIERCE readers what sort of weird warnings their parents issued to them while growing up and we can’t stop laughing over these responses. Here are some of the funniest:

1. Hug it out.

Instagram / @mixedmombrownbabies

“My dad would force my brother and i to hug each other standing in a corner when we got into a fight. We would squeeze each other tryna hurt each other 😂😂😂” @waitingmoon

2. Pack your bags and go. 

Instagram / @nextra.gifts.mtpleasant 

“‘Te voy a mandar pa Mexico con tu tía’” @larrita415_ 

3. The threat of el Cucuy.

Instagram / @wearemitu

“When I wouldn’t sleep my mom would say, “If you open your eyes, the Cucuy will come to get you!” 😯 It would scare me to death. Pinche cucuy!” — @hellengav74

4. A long visit with abuelita doesn’t seem so bad. 

Instagram / @skeddadle181

“My mom would threaten with sending us to Peru. Honestly, looking back, I should have taken her up on it because my Abuelita would have spoiled me rotten 🤣” @mamabean_d

5. The hand-holding technique. 

Instagram / @luciclementine

“When my brother and I would argue in the grocery store, my dad would make us hold hands until we left the store.” — @withlove_mandee

6. Don’t make us pull this car over! 

Instagram / @mommydearestinc

“My mother would threaten to stop the car on the freeway and throw us out if we didn’t stop fighting.” — @lamoodyreina

7. A weird and gross punishment that a lot of readers have in common.   

Instagram / @tablemannerstx

“My dad would say he was gonna make us lick salt off each other’s backs. We were so grossed out we would check ourselves realllll quick.” — @mividaencolor

8. The underwear warning. 

Instagram / @wickedpatterns

“My mom would threatened to tie us in underwear back to back in the balcony 😂”  — @danielyspineda

9. #TheLook 

Instagram / @candyskloset

“My mom never threatened. She just gave a look and said, “Want to go to the bathroom?” Which meant a spanking lol.” — @victorria_p

10. Hold your tongue. 

Instagram / @kid_spanglish

“‘Se te hace palo la lengua’ was a threat if you even thought about backtalking.” — @killahcarm

11. Cut off from technology.

Instagram / @theradstylist 

“My parents would threaten to take the phones and internet modem away when my sister and I would fight. It got so bad that they would actually take them to work with them so we wouldn’t sneak on the internet or call our friends lol.” @teoami

12. This rice threat sounds painful af. 

Instagram / @zahraricetraders

“Threatened to kneel on a pile of rice and lick salt off eachothers back 😂😂😂” — @jessicagmejia

13. What’s with all the licking??

Instagram / @mydadshoney

“My mom would threaten to put honey on my and @pgon805 back and make us lick it off each other” @wildcardb_tches

Mexico And The World Mourn The Loss Of Celso Piña, One Of Mexico’s Greatest Musicians

Entertainment

Mexico And The World Mourn The Loss Of Celso Piña, One Of Mexico’s Greatest Musicians

wachamagazine / Instagram

If there’s one instrument that best describes Mexican music is has to be the accordion. While the musical key instrument known as a squeezebox has its origins in Europe, it indeed came alive in Mexico as the staple sound in rancheras and cumbias. There is only one musician who thrived through the accordion sound, though sadly that is now a thing of the past.

Celso Piña, known as the “The Accordion Rebel,” died yesterday at the age of 66.

Credit: Instagram/@danonewillrise297

The Mexican musician was in his hometown of Monterrey, Mexico, and was soon scheduled to g on tour, but had a heart attack and died at the hospital.

La Tuna Group, Piña’s record label, confirmed in a statement that he died yesterday at 12:38 p.m. after suffering a heart attack.

Credit: Instagram/@mexicoprimero_

“Today is a sad day for La Tuna Group,” they stated, “Our deepest condolences to his family, friends, and followers. We are left with an intense emptiness, but he leaves us his great legacy forever. We appreciate respecting the privacy of the family.”

Piña seemed to have been in good spirits earlier in the day and tweeted for the final time. “No one can resist the cumbia,” he said.

The self-taught musician had been touring off and on for months. He also had upcoming shows in Georgia and Texas.

The Grammy-award winning musician had a musical career that spanned 40 decades, and aside from his musical stylings as an accordion player, he was also a composer, singer, and arranger.

Credit: Instagram/@patanegra_mx

Piña had collaborated with several contemporary artists including Lila Downs, Julieta Venegas, Cafe Tacvba, and Gloria Trevi, Variety reports. He was also more than a cumbia musician. His sound also fused into other musical genres, including norteña music, hip-hop, ska, reggae, and more.

Several celebrity fans and collaborators tweeted their heartfelt condolences.

According to the Grammy Academy, Piña got his hands on his first accordion in 1980. He taught himself how to play and performed with his brothers. “Together, they went on to play norteña and tropical music, eventually adding cumbia to their style,” the Academy states. “The brothers became known as ‘Celso Piña Y Su Ronda Bogotá,’ giving a nod to cumbia’s motherland.”

Fans on social media also expressed how much Piña meant to them.

One fan, @iphadra, tweeted, “his greatness of # CelsoPiña is not due to its successes or fame in the 5 continents. It is because it was he who came to claim the music of the marginalized.” @JJ4rmCh tweeted, Rest In Peace Celso Piña, no one fucked it up on an accordion like u did.” But this tweet we could totally relate to from @jennjenn1_  who tweeted, “It wasn’t a real quince or wedding until you played some #CelsoPiña ❤️🇲🇽 🎶🎶🎶 may his music live on for generations to come.”

Writer Melissa del Bosque had the honor of being able to interview him. She tweeted, “Hearing ‘Barrio Bravo’ for the first time was a life-changing experience. Celso Piña and Toy Hernández, of Control Machete, had created a whole new hybrid mixing Colombian cumbia with the anarchy of urban streets. I went directly to Monterrey to interview El Rebelde del Acordeón. Here we are at Cafe Brasil, one of his favorite haunts. As I wrote then, when ‘Cumbia Sobre el Rio hit the airwaves there wasn’t a car from Chicago to Chiapas that didn’t have the bass booming and the sonic onslaught layered with accordion rattling their windows.’ #RipCelsoPina.”

Last year, Piña visited one of his biggest fans, who is also an accordion player just like him. The two performed in the streets of Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Herrera recalled what it was like hearing that his musical idol had died. The young musician told El Universal that he was with his daughter when he heard the news that Piña had died. He said he couldn’t believe it, and all the memories from his incredible visit with him last year rushed back to him. He said it was a dream to have been able to perform with him. 

Here’s a couple of his most beloved and hit songs.

Here’s “Cumbia Sobre el Rio Suena” live and with an orchestra! He had such a distinct voice and sound. There was no one else like him.

“No Sea Conmigo”

This was his collaboration with Cafe Tacvba. So lovely! We dare you not to dance to this one.

What’s your favorite Celso Piña track? Let us know in the comment section below. Rest in power, Celso!!

READ: This Isn’t Your Mama’s Cumbia: The Eclectic History Of Latin America’s Classic Music Genre

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