Culture

These Men Represented Their Country In The Mister Global Pageant And We Are Living For These ‘National Costumes’

As any beauty pageant fan knows, the best part of the competition is the National Costume Show — a segment designed to showcase clothing that honors and celebrates contestants’ home countries.

Every year, outfits seem to get increasingly complicated, ornate, or simply engineered to go viral. This year’s Mister Global, an annual male beauty pageant founded in 2014, was no exception.

Same as every year, the most attention goes to pageant’s national outfits showcase.

Credit: David Ryo / Facebook

As always, the most visually enticing and talked-about competition of the Mister Global pageant is the National Costume Contest, during which each guy shows off his country’s heritage through an elaborate costume. “The winning costume is not about the size or design but the story and culture behind it,” says Kitti Kamjunsa, spokesperson of the male beauty pageant.

The pageant was won by Korea‘s Jong Woo Kim, who is a 23-year-old police administration student and model.

Credit: officialmisterglobal / Instagram

Jong Woo Kim is set to become an inspirational role model for young men all around the world. He will also become a Global Goodwill Ambassador and participate in environmental and charitable projects.

Among the other men who made it to the finals are Houssem Saïdi of Tunisia (first runner-up), José Luis Rodrigo Navarro of Spain (second runner-up), Kenan Murseli of Switzerland (third runner-up) and Braulio Encarnación of Dominican Republic (fourth runner-up).

Although a Latino didn’t win Mister Global this year, they still featured some of our favorite looks from the pageant.

MEXICO

Credit: Missosology

Mexico is a land of many different cultures. In the capital city, there’s even a park called Plaza de Las Tres Culturas. From the Aztec and the Mixtec to the Maya and the Zapotec, Mexico is rich in cultural identity. But according t Manuel Duarte, this year’s Mister Mexico, his look was inspired by the ancient Maya civilization.

BRAZIL

Mister Brazil won in 2017. Do you think this look would of helped him win this year?

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Braulio Encarnación, Mister Dominican Republic, was the fourth runner-up.

PANAMA

Mister Panama came out in full on Carnival flare and yet left little to the imagination. Also, that smile…

PERU

Mister Peru seems to be channeling the ancient Inca people, who lived in Peru through the late 1500s – until they were eradicated by the Spanish.

CHILE

One look at the Facebook reactions to Mister Chile and you can see that he did his country proud.

PUERTO RICO

This year’s Mister Puerto Rico was Edgar Irizarry. His costume “paid tribute to the indigenous people of Puerto Rico; the taínos,” Irizarry told Insider. “The costume I wore was designed to resemble the Cacique Taíno,” or a leader of the group.

CUBA

Mister Cuba 2019 is Rubert Manuel Arias Solozábal. This was the first year Cuba was represented in the pageant and he went all in. I mean a costume doesn’t get more Cuban than this.

And, of course, there’s the USA:

The Twitter reactions to Mister USA were hardly positive. Sure, Superman may be ‘native’ to the US in that he was created there and is a part of American pop culture. But with the immense cultural diversity of the US’s Native American tribes, many questioned by they weren’t used as an inspiration for the look.

These national costume looks are incredible but let’s not forget the guys also had a swimsuit competition.

For a more complete look at those looks check them out here.

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Beauty Queen Who Was Abandoned At An Airport As A Baby Reconnects With Her Birth Mother 40 Years Later

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Beauty Queen Who Was Abandoned At An Airport As A Baby Reconnects With Her Birth Mother 40 Years Later

Like many adopted children, Elizabeth Hunterton grew up aware that her nonbiological parents loved her. According to a recent interview with the former beauty pageant queen, she also had many dreams and ideas of how she came to be one of millions of children to be adopted every year in the United States.

As a young girl, Hunterton spent her youth dreaming that she’d come from royalty and had “been lifted away on the talons of a majestic eagle.”

Eventually, she learned that the truth was far more personal and tragic.

In January 1980, Hunterton was abandoned at the gate of a Nevada airport by two pilots

“I was about 10 days old,” Hunterton explained to People magazine in a recent interview. “I grew up my entire life trying to figure out what I did in those 10 days that ultimately led to them saying, ‘Let’s just leave her at the airport.'”

While Hunterton was adopted into a home soon after her abandonment the beauty pageant queen says in the years after, she often lamented a part of her life that she felt was missing. Fortunately, after taking a 23andMe test this past August, Hunterton has connected with her biological mother for the very first time.

Having had little to work with in regards to finding her biological parents (this includes having no birthplace, birth date or race) made life difficult for her when she was younger.

“It was really through this process of finding my birth mother that I’m able to rewrite my narrative,” she explained in the interview with People. “I had really prepared myself to be rejected by both sides of my biological family… And It ended up being so much more beautiful than anything I could’ve written.”

Hunterton was raised by a white family and crowned Miss Nevada in 2004.

Despite having a happy and loving upbringing, Hunterton felt lost about the uncertainty surrounding her own race. According to People, she often wondered if “everyone from her friends to her Starbucks barista were somehow related to her.”

“When this all started unfolding, there were certainly points that I thought to myself, ‘Maybe I’ll just walk away now,’ because it just got hard,” she explained. Eventually, in 2018, DNA databases helped Hunterton track down her biological father. Unfortunately, she soon discovered that he had died in 2004, and had never known she had been born.

Soon enough her search brought her to 23andMe where her profile found a few hits in March. Eventually, Hunterton reached out to three different women hopefully that one of them would be a match. All three ultimately proved not to be a match and Hunterton decided to give up after so much disappointment.

“I pulled out my bucket list, crossed it off, wrote her name down, and that was it,” she explained before sharing that just as she began to change her focus back to raising her 5- and 6-year-old sons, she received a ping for another connection. This time it came from a second cousin who offered to help put her in contact with her birth mother.

Hunterton soon learned that she had a Black father and a Japanese mother both of whom met at the Fort Ord military base. She also learned that she was born in a hospital in California and had not been intentionally abandoned.

“When I received her email, she shared that she wasn’t able to take care of me as she believed I deserved,” Hunterton explained to People. “Therefore, she gave me to her roommate who was supposed to take me to an adoption agency. When my birth mother was told that I was actually left at the airport instead, it took quite a toll.”

Hunterton explained because of her connection to her biological mother she was able to track down her birth certificate.

In an emailed statement to People Hunterton’s biological mother explained that at first she was “surprised, scared and truly overwhelmed” by the idea of meeting her daughter.

“I was shocked to hear from her and by the amount of research she did. It was all very overwhelming and brought back a lot of painful memories,” her biological mother who remains anonymous to People but shared that she is 65-year-old explained. “However, it’s also a tremendous blessing to find out what a strong and wonderful woman she turned out to be. One day, when we’ve all healed a bit more, hopefully, we’ll be able to meet.”

“She has such a good heart,” Hunterton explained of her mother. “We exchange occasional emails and texts and holiday niceties. But the good thing is, I have a mom. I don’t need to put any unfair, unrealistic expectations on her. I just give her permission to be exactly who she is and it’s perfect.”

“She’s now giving herself permission to live her life and it’s actually pretty beautiful,” Hunterton went onto explain of her biological mother. “She says, ‘All my hopes and dreams are in you. I never thought that anybody that looked like you could come from me, somebody that’s poised and eloquent and successful. Those are just things that never happened for me. But here you are.’ So now she’s living her life, and it’s pretty beautiful to watch her heal and kind of come to life… I think that was a really beautiful way for the story to unfold, that in the end, it flowed so beautifully, both through my mom, myself and my birth mother. It really kind of unified all three of us in different ways. But it was all I could’ve ever hoped for to hear from her.”

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A Mexican Beauty Queen Has Landed In Jail On Kidnapping Charges, Why Does This Keep Happening?

Culture

A Mexican Beauty Queen Has Landed In Jail On Kidnapping Charges, Why Does This Keep Happening?

The pageant world is popular in communities all over the planet. From Russia to the U.S. and across Latin America, beauty queens (and kings) strut their stuff on runways and display their many talents. But the pageant world is also known to suffer from a more sinister side that often lands itself in the headlines.

In Mexico, beauty pageants have long been connected to organized crime and international human trafficking rings. Now, one former beauty queen has landed herself in jail in connection to these terrible crimes.

A former Mexican beauty queen has been jailed in connection to a kidnapping ring.

A former Oaxaca beauty queen has been jailed without bail on suspicion of being part of a kidnapping ring operating in the Mexican states of Veracruz and Oaxaca.

Laura Mojica Romero, 25, was Miss Oaxaca in 2018 and the 2020 International Queen of Coffee in Colombia, a beauty pageant at which she represented Mexico. She was arrested Thursday with seven other people in a raid conducted by a federal anti-kidnapping unit after two months of investigation.

A judge on Saturday ruled that Mojica and the seven others will remain in prison for the next two months while authorities continue to gather evidence. Members of the group each face up to 50 years in prison.

Romero had tried to position herself as unique among beauty queens in the country.

Laura Mojica Romero defined herself as “more than a pretty face” during a interview she did in 2019. The 25-year-old, who at that time had just won the Miss Oaxaca contest for the second time, said that the contest had taken an important turn because it highlighted aspects that went “beyond” the contestants’ own beauty.

She put herself out there as an example when remembering that she participated in the delivery of supplies (sweaters, blankets and coats) in remote Indigenous communities and announced that among her future projects included support for the musical education of children from impoverished communities, as well as the formation of women’s entrepreneurship cells; a strategy that she claimed was to combat gender violence.

“We cannot stand idly by, we have to eradicate violence against women, through campaigns and talks that make men aware of this problem,” said the also graduate in Business Administration from the Universidad Veracruzana (UV) to Newsweek Mexico.

Mexico is an international hub for human trafficking.

In its most recent report, the organization Alto al Secuestro warned that the states with the highest incidence of kidnappings are the State of Mexico, with seven; Veracruz, with 12; Oaxaca, with six; Guerrero, with five; and Tabasco, Sinaloa and Mexico City, with four respectively.

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