Culture

The L.A. Times Rated All The Spicy Snacks From Hot Cheetos To Takis, And The Results Are Causing A Controversy On Twitter

It seems that spicy foods are everywhere these days. Every brand out there is releasing some version of their original product but in ‘flamin hot’ form, there’s an abundance of YouTube videos of people eating insanely spicy foods as if it were some sort of competition, restaurants have ‘eat it and it’s free’ contests for spicy options.

The world is obsessed with spicy food right now.

But let’s be real. Many Latino foods were the OG spicy. Many Latino chefs and even our tías and abuelas have been experimenting with some seriously spicy foods for many many years.

But now that it’s gone mainstream, the LA Times recently conducted a not so official study into which snacks are the spiciest and the results have proven to be pretty controversial.

One writer at the L.A. Times decided to sample every spicy branded snack and share his findings with the world.

Credit: @latimesfood / Twitter

In the article, he says that he’s sampled every spicy snack known to mankind (not exactly), except for the ones that he couldn’t find, that he deemed unworthy, or both.

He also calls out the haters who say all the Flamin’ Hot and spicy snacks taste the same, saying that’s simply not true. He notes the subtle differences based on combination of heat vs. flavor.

So what are his findings?

Credit: @latimesfood / Twitter

According to this LA Times Food writer, his favorite spicy snack is the Doritos Flamin’ Hot Nacho. They’re the perfect mix of cheesy and spicy and come packed with a pretty hefty kick of spice.

Next came the Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Puffs which he says are packed with spicy flavor, sometimes almost too much so. The only con he had to say about these is about the texture – sometimes too much can build up in your back teeth leaving you feeling sick.

Coming in at third place is Pop Fuego Popcorn. He says the level of MSG is at a 12 and that the flavor sensation is something like being on a rollercoaster. Pop Fuego kernels are not particularly heat-heavy but they’re almost hyperbolically tangy and acidic.

The Top 3 options weren’t exactly controversial picks but the rest of the results seemed to be pretty polarizing on social media.

Credit: @ismacont / Twitter

I mean who would ever put Takis Fuego and Doritos Dinamita in a tie for 5th place?!? Or Zapp’s Spicy Cajun Crawtators ahead of Doritos Tapatío? That’s just straight up madness.

And how are the OG Flamin’ Hot Cheetos not number one?

And it’s clear that the classic battle between Hot Cheetos and Takis rages on.

Credit: @latimesfood / Twitter

But like in all honesty, will it ever go away? I hope not.

But some on Twitter were totally not having any of it.

Credit: @latimesfood / Twitter

I mean ranking #12 out of 30 isn’t too bad. But apparently still wasn’t good enough for this Flamin’ Hot Cheetos con Limon super fan…

In his write up, Lucas Peterson said these would take a back seat to Takis any day.

I mean this Twitter user was so upset they’re apparently canceling their subscription to the LA Times.

Credit: @GenePark / Twitter

Now that’s some serious feelings there.

But, to be fair, the LA Times placed Andy Capp’s Hot Fires at #27 (out of 30) and said they had an unpleasant spice mixture that tasted like powered tomato. That’s not great.

One Doritos super fan took to Twitter to notify the LA Times of a possible typo in their report.

Credit: @iamHectorDiaz / Twitter

The LA Times actually tweeted back saying: “These are pretty good and am honestly impressed how much these taste like Tapatío, they’re just not the best *spicy* snack.

Be careful, those are fighting words.

Also, just this tweet, because I’m pretty sure all of us were thinking it.

Credit: @latimesfood / Twitter

Because the panza is a real thing.

H/T: The Official Spicy Snack Power Rankings

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J Balvin Gets Hot As He Chows Down On Fiery Hot Wings And Spills The Tea On All Things Balvin

Entertainment

J Balvin Gets Hot As He Chows Down On Fiery Hot Wings And Spills The Tea On All Things Balvin

The Prince of Reggaeton and one of the world’s most-streamed artists on both Spotify and YouTube joined the host of First We Feast for a little dish session on all things Balvin. Aside from the joys of watching Balvin devour entirely too spicy foods and salsas, we learn so much about the Colombian artist – and get to meet his dog Enzo.

J Balvin devours spicy AF wings and spills some tea in a new episode of First We Feast. 

Balvin shares how he used to be his own manager and even pretended that he was a totally separate person from J Balvin – Jose. In conversations with record labels and radio stations, he’d hype up J Balvin (as any good manager should do) and would tell those interested in booking the artist that he’d have to check in with him and make sure that his schedule would allow it. 

We learn tons of new things about the Prince of Reggaeton. 

Like apparently his first stage name was nearly Scotch Bonnet, which is a pretty amazing revelation considering it comes during a segment while he piles some Scotch Bonnet hot sauce on chicken. For those of you who don’t know, Scotch Bonnets are one of the world’s hottest chili peppers. Balvin says that his friend, rapper Fat Al, said that he should have a spicy name but Scotch Bonnet never stuck. 

And he shares why he thinks that reggaeton is outpacing the rest of the music industry.

J Balvin credits the meteoric rise of reggaeton thanks to its feel good vibes and its emotional value. He loves to make people vibe and feel something with his music.  He also gives credit where credit is due, pointing out how there are so many artists before him who have paved the way for his success.

Check out the full video here on YouTube.

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Spicy Food Lovers Have Reason To Celebrate As New Study Says Eating Chilies Could Be Secret To Longevity

Culture

Spicy Food Lovers Have Reason To Celebrate As New Study Says Eating Chilies Could Be Secret To Longevity

Chilies have been hailed as a holy grail food by many for its flavor and mythic health properties. Now, researchers have found that consuming chilies as a part of your regular diet can lower the risk of death from a wide variety of illnesses and diseases.

New research shows that chilies provide a protective effect against a variety of diseases.

If you’r the type of person that piles on loads of salsa on pretty much everything you eat, then you may have reason to celebrate. According to a new study, regularly eating chili peppers could provide previously unrecognized health benefits that help to lengthen people’s lives.

Chili eaters may have a “significantly reduced risk of dying from cardiovascular disease or cancer”, according to preliminary research which will be presented this week at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2020. 

While previous research has found consuming chilies has an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer and blood-glucose regulating effect due to capsaicin – which gives chilies their characteristic hot taste, the study is the first large scale effort to compare reported consumption of chili with disease mortality.

Researches drew evidence from a wide range of study participants which really helps illustrate how important chilies could be.

Unlikes previous studies, researchers screened 4,729 studies from five leading global health databases, these were: Ovid, Cochrane, Medline, Embase and Scopus. These included four large studies which specifically included health outcomes for participants with data on chili pepper consumption.

This provided the research team with the health and dietary records of more than half a million people across four countries: the United States, Italy, China and Iran, which allowed them to compare the outcomes of those who consumed chilies to those who rarely or never ate them. 

Compared to those who “rarely” or “never” ate chilies, the analysis found people who did eat them had:

  • a 26 per cent relative reduction in cardiovascular mortality
  • a 23 per cent relative reduction in cancer mortality
  • a 25 per cent relative reduction in all-cause mortality

A similar study from last year found very similar results.

Carried out in Italy, where chili is a common ingredient, the study compared the risk of death among 23,000 people, some of whom ate chili and some of whom didn’t. Participants’ health status and eating habits were monitored over eight years, and researchers found that the risk of dying from a heart attack was 40% lower among those eating chili peppers at least four times per week.

Death from stroke was more than halved, according to results published Monday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

“An interesting fact is that protection from mortality risk was independent of the type of diet people followed,” said study lead author Marialaura Bonaccio, an epidemiologist at the Mediterranean Neurological Institute (Neuromed).

“In other words, someone can follow the healthy Mediterranean diet, someone else can eat less healthily, but for all of them chili pepper has a protective effect,” she said.

And eat up – because if science is right, our beloved chilies and tomatoes are going extinct.

Two of Latin America’s most important ingredients – staples of cuisines across the region – are in danger of possible extinction thanks to climate change. Tomatoes and chilies both make up a huge part of traditional recipes from Mexico to Brazil and Argentina to Cuba – and they’re close to disappearing from grocery stores everywhere.

Climate change is wreaking havoc on the planet. But one of the most at-risk species is the humble bumble bee. These often feared insects are a vital source of pollination for thousands of plant and flower species around the world – if they disappear so too do the species of plants that depend on them.

Pollinators are species of great importance for a healthy environment. They are responsible for the the diversity and health of various biomes. Across Latin America, the bumble bee is largely responsible for the pollination of modern agriculture and this could have a major impact on the production of tomatoes and chilis. Unfortunately, bumblebees are currently threatened, resulting in the possible extinction of different vegetables, including tomatoes and chili.

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