Culture

Here’s How One Houston Panadería Was Saved Because Of A Teenager’s Tweet

A Houston teenager didn’t want her dad to close his panadería, so she turned to Twitter for help.

Jacqueline “Jackie” Garza said she originally tweeted a plea for help to alert people in the area of her father’s business, She hoped it would compel friends, family, and co-workers to stop by for some of her dad’s delicious food. But the Internet had another idea.

She showed off all the food her father makes, because it is more than just a bakery for pan dulce.

“At first I didn’t think the interaction between the media and the business was going to correlate,” Garza said. “I was like, ‘Okay. Just because it got retweets doesn’t mean a lot of people are coming.’ I was expecting a small change.”

But then Garza’s tweet was flooded with support as people came together for the panadería.

Garza was not expecting the outpour of positivity from the Twitter community, but is so grateful for it.

The support was so overwhelming, in fact, that her father went to the store and stocked up so he could meet the demand.

“My dad was definitely not expecting such a drastic change as the one we got,” Garza said. “He didn’t know that Twitter existed before the tweet went viral but so far he’s handled it very well.”

People started to show up in droves, and posted photos and videos at the restaurant.

The panadería has only been open for two years but things have changed thanks to Garza’s viral tweet.

The tweet and the response, she says, saved her family’s business from the brink.

“I am so proud of my dad and my mom for continuing to keep the art of making pan dulce alive,” Garza said. “I am so grateful to have an opportunity to give the world a taste of my culture. Forever grateful for the support my family and I have received. Keeping tradition alive is our strive.”

As for the social media fame that came with it, Garza says her father is not affected.

“I don’t think my dad knows he’s Twitter famous and I don’t think he understands what that means either,” Garza said.

Congratulations, Jackie. You have shown everyone the power of social media when used for good.


READ: Twitter Users Are Sharing Heart Warming Stories About Parents Who Sacrificed For Their Children By Immigrating To The U.S.

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MitúCares: Latinx En Medicina Wins Grant To Increase Social Media Community

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MitúCares: Latinx En Medicina Wins Grant To Increase Social Media Community

Our community does better when we all work together. As such, mitú wants to help people uplifting our communities. We asked all of you to nominate people that were doing the work and mitú is proud to announce Latinx en Medicina as one of two winners of the mitúCares grant program.

Latinx en Medicina is more than a social media page, it is an important place for Latinx healthcare workers to connect.

Leslie Gonzalez is a fourth-year medical student and has spent her academic career feeling like the only one. She often walked into classrooms and was the only Latina in the room from her masters programs through medical school. This inspired her to create Latinx en Medicina.

Gonzalez, who grew up in the San Fernando Valley, went to California State University, Northridge for her undergraduate degree. She admits that during that time she felt isolated because there just weren’t any mentors who helped her along the way. She loved her experience but walking into a class for her pre-med degree and seeing no one that looked like her took a toll on her.

Getting into medical school was something much harder than she expected and wished she had a community to ask for advice.

“Applying to medical school is a whole different kind of challenge in its own. I didn’t really have mentors who looked like me,” Gonzalez says. “I don’t recall seeing a doctor who looked like me, that was Latina or Latino or Latinx. At the moment, I didn’t really understand that, until I got into med school. I applied to medical school and I didn’t get in. The first time that I applied, I didn’t get in. It’s very common not to get in the first time that you apply but I didn’t know that because I didn’t have a community to talk about this with.”

Fortunately, a pre-med counselor pointed her in the direction of a master’s program. It quickly became two master’s degrees before she was comfortable enough to apply to medical school for a second time. This time, she was accepted and what awaited her was less representation that looked like her.

Gonzalez said that in her first-year class of 200 to 220 students, 6 percent of the students identified as Latinx. She knew that it was a problem that had to be addressed. People should be able to find mentors in their fields that understand them on a cultural level, someone who could help her navigate her nagging imposter syndrome.

“I went through the motions of med school,” Gonzalez recalls. “Again, I didn’t really have a mentor who looked like me. I didn’t really have somebody to look up to. Again, I felt like I had to do the most just to prove my worth in med school because of that imposter syndrome. I didn’t know it at the moment but that was exactly what I was experiencing, the imposter syndrome.”

Gonzalez created Latinx en Medicina to create a place for people to finally connect and network.

Latinx en Medicina is all about helping Latinx healthcare professionals connect with each other like never before. Gonzalez wanted a place for any and all people who work in healthcare to have a place to network and create an online community. She remembers receiving so many messages from young Latinx people in school and starting their healthcare careers reaching out to her for advice. After a while, it got to be too much to handle on her own so she wanted to start connecting people to one another.

“Essentially, I was acting as the older sister in pointing them in the right direction. But, I am one person,” Gonzalez says. “I can only handle so many messages in my DMs. On top of that, I’m still in school, I still have that schedule. The thing that I came up with … [was to] build a community that was separate from my personal social media platform [to] build its own community.”

Another important function of Latinx en Medicina is to connect healthcare providers with patients who are Latinx. Gonzalez watched how much being able to connect with patients in their language meant to them.

Gonzalez remembers being able to talk to one young patient in Spanish and the impact it had on her then. She visited a young Spanish-speaking patient and asked her what she wanted to be when she grew up. The patient said she wanted to be a doctor so Gonzalez let her wear her stethoscope and reaffirmed that she can be a doctor if she wanted to.

Moments like that, according to Gonzalez, are some of the most touching and rewarding parts of the job. Moving forward, that young girl will remember the time the doctora encouraged her to do the same.

Congratulations, Leslie! Thank you for creating a place in the medical world for our community.

READ: This Beauty Pageant Queen Is Trading Her Crown For Her Doctor Scrubs To Help Tackle Coronavirus Pandemic

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Viral Video Of Overworked Texas Dominos Workers Burdened By Snow Storm Goes Viral

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Viral Video Of Overworked Texas Dominos Workers Burdened By Snow Storm Goes Viral

Texas’s current power crisis from a devastating storm has disrupted power generation and frozen natural gas pipelines. The is historic storm has driven electric demand higher than the state has ever seen, but it’s not just electric energy being overextended as a result. It’s physical and mental human energy as well.

Recently, an image of two exhausted Domino’s Pizza workers went viral for showing the extreme exhaustion workers are experiencing.

In a post shared to News4sanantonio.com’s Chime In page a user by the name of July DeLuna explained “This Dominos in San Antonio. Working during this crisis. They had a weekend worth of food and it was gone within 4 hours. This team helped those that needed help. These are the essential workers that need recognition. They were the only pizza place open. Every pizza place was closed but dominos stayed open to help those in need.”

Little else is known about the exhausted workers in the viral image but it did rack up over 8K comments within hours of being posted.

“Dominoes better pay them for the shifts they’ll miss while they don’t have any ingredients. With this practical free advertising it’s the least they could do. Otherwise these kind people worked themselves out of already bad hourly pay,” one user commented.

“,As someone who works in the food service industry, the thought of selling out of all product in only four hours and how much work goes in to preparing that much food is unfathomable levels of nightmare fuel,” another noted.

In another response to the image, a Reddit user wrote “I cannot express to you how upsetting it is to be the only food source open during hard times, to still be open and show up to do your job with higher than normal levels of orders, and still get yelled at by management for not having orders out within a window of time.”

Images of overworked and stressed is nothing new of course.

Fast-food workers are often burdened by their field’s daily challenges. In 2020, food industry workers are being forced to endure customer abuse at even higher rates. Last year a TikTok video of a Subway restaurant falling asleep while in the middle of making a sandwich went viral.

“This is actually really sad. I can’t imagine how underslept she is. Not to mention the wage people get paid at Subway… She deserves better,” one TikTok user by the name of Monique Emilia commented at the time. The skincare influencer Hyram also commented writing “Poor thing… Can’t imagine how underslept she is, we’re too hard on service workers.”

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