culture

An Artist From Texas Turned ‘Game Of Thrones’ Characters Into Aztec Art And It’s More Lit Than Our Fuming Mad Queen

@emmanuelvaltierraillustrator \ Instagram | Edited by Mitú

Aztec art was at the center of the Aztec empire during the 15th and 16th century. The imagery is an insightful view of what life was like back then, and it still holds so much information that continues to fascinate scholars.

While the art form is centuries old, it’s still very relevant to our culture, our history, and traditions, which is why a Latino artist is giving it a new life.

Artist Emmanuel Valtierra has launched a series of Aztec-style imagery that features some of today’s pop culture icons.

Instagram/@emmanuelvaltierraillustrator

According to his website, Valtierra, was born in San Antonio, Texas and raised in Monterrey, México. He studied Graphic Design at the University of Nuevo Leon and Photography at San Antonio College.

Valtierra said he is using current references to introduce people to the historic art form.

Instagram/@emmanuelvaltierraillustrator

“Many people outside Mexico didn’t even know it existed,” Valtierra told Remezcla. “I wanted to introduce art little by little to a new public, and there was no better way than to do it with images they will recognize easily, like video games, movies, and cartoons.”

Some of the pop culture references include Game Of Thrones, Day of the Dead, the Avengers, and Pokemon.

Instagram/@emmanuelvaltierraillustrator

“The love Valtierra has for history has influenced him on all his projects,” his website states. “The goal is to keep teaching new generations about our past in a fun way in every media possible. In the future, Valtierra is planning to release more books, direct more videos, and work on more games for his public and followers.”

If you’re interested in his work, Valtierra also has some items for purchase.

Instagram/@emmanuelvaltierraillustrator

The item above is an illustrated book ($38) in which, as Valtierra states, “recounts the events of the war that the Aztecs had against the Spaniards. Now imagine a world where the Aztecs had defeated the Spaniards. How would our world be different?”

Click here to purchase, or here to learn more about him and his artwork.

READ: Ugly Primo Is One Latino Artist Everyone Who Loves Pop Culture Should Know About

Some Texas Teens Are About To Get Very Political At Their Quinces and Here's Why

Culture

Some Texas Teens Are About To Get Very Political At Their Quinces and Here’s Why

Credit: @Quinceanera.Photography / Instagram

There is nothing more quintessential and omnipresent in Latino culture quite like quinceañeras. These traditional celebrations are typically marked by a mass followed by food and drink, music, and choreographed dances – and soon, in Texas, voter registration.

No matter where you live, what your family is like, or who your friends are, quinceañeras are opportunities for everyone to come to together and celebrate. So, one organization is using the celebration as a way to get Latinos registered to vote.

Texas non-profit Jolt Initiative is looking to take advantage of quinces to increase civic participation of Latinos across Texas.

They’ve made it their mission to reach as many Latinos as possible and get them registered to vote. Obviously, this means that would take a look at quinceañeras because of how important they are to the community.

Jolt estimates that nearly 50,000 quinceañeras take place across Texas each year.

We all know how many people show up to quinceañeras, so this campaign has the potential to reach tens of thousands of Latinos. In addition to getting Latinos registered to vote, Jolt will also inform them about potential candidates and policies that are affecting the community.

“For us, this is about community, not just politics,” Cristina Tzintzún Ramírez , founder and executive director of Jolt, told NBC News. “We want to defend and honor the community and what better way than to lift up the power of our vote in the community, particularly with half of all those turning 18 in our state (being) Latino?”

People are all about this new initiative to register voters.

Credit: @VillescazAngela / Twitter

The campaign by Jolt is called Poder Quince and they’re looking to partner with hundreds of young Latina women so that their quinceañeras can be fun and impactful.

Historically, the Latino community has been underrepresented and even victim of voter suppression campaigns. We witnessed this last year in Kansas when officials moved the only polling station outside of the city of Dodge. The move made it almost impossible for the largely-Latino city to cast their votes.

However, since the quince is supposed to be all about the birthday girl, what does a civic-minded quinceañera look like exactly?

“Poder Quince participants will receive a free photo booth at their event, free Snapchat filters geotagged to their venue and – for one lucky winner – a celebrity guest appearance,” and of course, voter registration cards, reads a statement about the initiative.

The group is fighting for the dignity and respect the Latino community deserves.

In a press release, Cristina Tzintzún Ramirez, Jolt’s founder and executive director, said: “When we use the power of Latino culture, we can shape the narrative, reach millions of Latinos and build long-term voting power to win our community the dignity and respect we deserve.”

The Jolt Initiative goes on to say, “In Texas, where Latinos make up 40% of the state’s population and by 2030 will be the majority, quinceañeras are not an underground cultural tradition, they are part of the mainstream that touches the lives of millions of Texans.”

The slogan for the initiative: Brown, beautiful, and unstoppable.

Jolt Initiative has ambitious goals to register 5,000 new voters. The group is betting that it will have better luck by linking voting to the quinceañera tradition, one part cultural institution, one part rite of passage, and one big fiesta.

It’s one place where those trying to enlist new voters can find all the generations, from children to grandparents. The parties are a particularly good spot to find young voters, who have traditionally lagged their elders in terms of turnout.

According to the group, they plan to attend 15 quinceañeras per week across Texas (including the cities of Austin, Dallas, and Houston) and have set a target to register 5,000 new voters in the first eight months of their campaign.

All of this has people wondering when the group will come to their state.

Credit: @Carmen50 / Twitter

Quinceañeras are a beautiful tradition and it’s so exciting for them to be used as a platform to help the community. Most young Latinas have a quince party and even more Latinos have attended a friend’s quinces. Seems like a good place to start registering young Latino voters.

READ: 20 Quinceañera Themes To Copy And Paste

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