Entertainment

People On Twitter Can’t Get Enough Of A Woman Selling The Official Tamales Of Billie Eilish

Mexico is putting its ingenuity on full display this week after a tamal stand outside a Billie Eilish concert started advertising its products as the “official tamales of Billie Eilish.” The woman working the Tamales García food truck outside the Corona Capital Festival heard the sensational singer start playing “bad guy,” and jumped on the opportunity. Video footage shows the woman doing a million things at once, including cupping her hands to announce to concert goers that hers were the “official tamales of Billie Eilish.”

Mexican Internet is spreading her message even further, calling the marketing strategy as proof of “el ingenio mexicano,” or “Mexican ingenuity.” The original tweet containing the video has been retweeted nearly 3k and liked over 15k, so, we’d say the strategy was a viral success.

“Estos son las tamales oficiales de Billie Eilish, amiga,” the woman tells passerby.

CREDIT: @ERIKQUIROGA123 / TWITTER

“These are the official tamales of Billie Eilish, friend,” she shouts while preparing other peoples’ orders. The woman’s incredible multitasking skills coupled with the marketing strategy has viewers making her the example of Mexican ingenuity.  “Amo el ingenio Mexicano,” tweeted one Julio (@Julio25d). Another person couldn’t help but laugh, tweeting, “HAHAHAHAHA another level of marketing,” in Spanish. “Ay que bonito, se mira el esfuerzo de las personas,” (“Oh how beautiful, look at the people’s efforts”) tweeted La Yessi (@yessi_alvarad0). 

Unfortunately, we can’t seem to find any internet presence from Tamales García.

Oh, and Tamales García has the inside scoop: “she likes green and sweet” tamales.

CREDIT: @ERIKQUIROGA123 / TWITTER

“She likes verde and dulce… take the official tamales of Billie Eilish, friend,” she tells the thousands of people who turned out to hear the 17-year-old artist. Mexican Twitter is joking that they also have the official water of Billie Eilish and Justin Beiber. Others are joking that “if they’re official, then I want ten.” We accept any reason, made-up or not, to consume more tamales. Maybe Tamales García knew that all along, and were marketing on Mexican principles of validation for tamales consumption. Whatever the reason, Mexican Twitter has dubbed this strategy “the best of the best.”

What’s more, Tamales García also considers itself the Official Tamales of the entire Corona Capital music festival.

CREDIT: @AMONOS_RICKY / TWITTER

The annual music festival is held in Mexico City and is going on nine years strong. Other headliners include The Strokes, Weezer, Franz Ferdinand, Interpol, Flume, Keane and The Raconteurs. If you look closely enough at their sign, Tamales García is also home to the official tamales of The Strokes, Weezer, Franz Ferdinand, Nick Murphy… you get the picture. That means that customers would read this menu sign and ask for the tamal de Billie Eilish or de The Strokes. If you wanted a Flume tamal, you’d be out of luck, but it seems they’d have an abundance of tamales de Flome. ????

Either Tamales García is incredibly gifted at being home to the taste preferences of a dozen internationally acclaimed artists and bands, or they have a real gift for the marketing value of “official” merch. Their sign even has the official logo of Corona Capital, clearly and skillfully hand-drawn. With so much competition from other tamal vendors in the heart of Mexico City, we have to give it to Tamales García for finding a way to stand out from the crowd. Billie Eilish was the final performance, making her the headling event. 

Other folks are wondering what Billie Eilish would have to say about the marketing strategy.

CREDIT: BILLIE EILISH / FACEBOOK

I’m intrigued … What will be Billie Eilish’s position on the tamales, friend?  Do you think the Billie is more of a chicken in salsa verde or something less traditional, like a vegan type? Maybe she likes raisin rosita,” tweeted Pablo Diablo (@heyfungi). Billie Eilish was born and raised in Highland Park, in East Los Angeles, and arguably grew up eating tamales. Eilish was raised vegetarian and regularly promotes veganism to her millions of social media followers. As far as we can tell, the only time Eilish has taken to social media to talk about tamales was in November 2017 when she posted a rare smiling selfie captioned, “when u look like an undercooked tamale but he still love u.”

READ: The Exhausting Process Of Making Tamales For The Holidays Broken Down In GIFs

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A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

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Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

Things That Matter

Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

JiromyXool / Facebook

Few days are as important or as celebrated as a teenager’s 15th birthday. So imagine the level of selflessness one must have to be able to say ‘no, I don’t want any of the celebration, I rather help out my community.’

Well, one teen in Merida, Mexico did just that this week when she told her family ‘thanks, but no thanks’ to her big quince and instead used the money that had been raised for her special day to help out her neighbors who have been impacted by the Coronavirus pandemic.

Her party was canceled thanks to Coronavirus, so she decided to help out those less fortunate.

In many countries across Latin America, the quinceañera is a huge milestone for teenagers. Beautiful dresses, visits from the entire family, big parties, and the best gifts are the norm at most quinces. But for 15-year-old Jiromy Xool Pech, instead of spending money on a lavish birthday celebration, she opted to use her party funds to help feed the needy.

Jiromy and her family had long planned her quinceañera – she had been looking forward to it for years. But with the pandemic hitting her community in Mérida particularly hard, the teen decided to put the party aside and use everything that had been invested in the ceremony to help her neighbors who have been impacted by the pandemic.

“Instead of partying, I prefer to give food to people, to help them with that,” Jiromy told El Universal. Jiromy not only asked to donate the money for her quince to the community, but she was also out there helping distribute the food to her neighbors.

Jiromy and her family weren’t alone in helping out the community either. Much of the food that was given out was prepared from by neighbors and local businesses that came to join Jiromy’s cause once word began to spread.

Unfortunately, many quinceañeras have been canceled or postponed thanks to the Coronavirus pandemic.

Credit: Diego Sanchez / Getty Images

One of Mexico City’s most famous markets for buying quince dresses – el Mercado Lagunilla – has been closed for three months. This ins’t just hating a major impact on dressmakers and salespeople, but it also means that young teens aren’t able to buy the dresses to celebrate their big day.

But not all is completely lost: there are those who have begun to return, like Ximena González, who came with her family to try on dresses. Her quince was scheduled for May 16, but the pandemic changed everything, and now they expect it to take place in November.

“I was scared and upset but I had to accept it. Some friends can no longer go because they are moving,” she told El Universal. She added, “I hope that when it is my party the infections have gone down and that everything is done as if nothing had happened.”

Mexico has been hit particularly hard by the pandemic, including Jiromy’s hometown of Merida.

Jiromy’s selfless act to help her community comes as Mexico continues to see record breaking numbers of cases. Tens of thousands are dying and even more are losing their jobs and being forced back into poverty.

As of August 6, Mexico has more than 456,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 49,698 people have died from the virus. In Jiromy’s state of Yucatan, there have been more than 10,000 cases of the virus and it’s had a huge impact on tourism, which is a major economic force in the state. Therefore, it makes sense that the 15-year-old thought it was important to use the money raised for her party to help those who are suffering financially.

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