culture

Hey Gentlemen, Let’s Up Your Fashion Game This Year With These Easy Style Tips

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When you hear the term “a stylish man,” what’s the image that instantly appears in your mind? For most people, it would be that of a sharply-dressed man in a fitted suit, well-groomed and dressed to the nines. That’s usually why some of you have the notion that you can never be naturally stylish because that’s just not “you.” There are more ways than one for a man to look stylish – wearing a well-fitted suit is just one of them.

Every man has his own style personality; it’s just a matter of finding yours. That said, there are certain style rules and tips that you can adapt according to your preferences and match your personality. Here are 21 of those tips.

The Fit Is Everything

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Whether you’re a suit guy or a jeans-and-t-shirt guy, your clothes should fit perfectly. Ill-fitting clothes can make you look sloppy and take away several inches off your height. So, even the most expensive suit could look terrible on you if it doesn’t fit right. On the other hand, wearing the right fit will give you that effortlessly stylish look even if you’re just wearing jeans and a graphic tee.

See how good Michael Trevino manages to look by rocking just a plain hoodie with a pair of distressed jeans. The right fit makes this look work for him.

Start Out With Classics

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Before you start developing your personal style, it’s best to begin with the classics rather than experiment with lots of trends all at once. Start out with solid tees and well-fitted denim with boots or white sneakers. Or in case of formals, pair a classic white button-down with a pair of slacks in navy blue or some other neutral tone. You can then expand on these styles by adding a few trendy pieces that you like.

Stick to Neutral Tones (For Now)

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When you’re just beginning to develop your style wardrobe, it’s best to start out with neutral tones because it’s easy to match them together. Since they’re not overpowering, it’s hard to go wrong with them. You can gradually add more colorful pieces as you progress (if you want). Neutral colors include black, white, brown, khaki, navy, gray and olive.

Go Beyond Black and Brown Footwear

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While black and brown are “safe” color choices, there are plenty of shoe colors you can experiment with. Look for suede and leather shoes in reds, blues, and greens. If you’re not yet confident to experiment with such bold colors, trying going for darker shades of these same colors or stick to grays.

Retro Sneakers are All the Rage

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Retro sneakers have made a comeback – from Reebok Club C and Adidas Continental to Nike Cortez and Onitsuka Tiger. Combining style and comfort, these timeless classics would be the perfect addition to your closet. They don’t make you look like you’re going to the gym, unlike regular sneakers.

Wear Sneakers Sparingly

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Sneakers are usually a big no-no in men’s fashion. Although the more classic designs have become an exception these days, that doesn’t necessarily mean you should wear them every time you go out. Even if the office dress code says “business casual,” save your sneakers for Casual Fridays and brunches.

Experiment With Colored Trousers

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Once you feel comfortable enough to move on from neutral tones, start experimenting with colorful trousers. This could be anything from red to violet. Colored trousers are a great way to make your outfit pop, and take the boring out of your all-neutral wardrobe.

Invest in a Nice Fitted Blazer

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Even just one nice blazer can turn your whole wardrobe around. Invest in a high-quality blazer in a neutral color, and make sure it fits you well. You can then dress this piece up with a button-down or dress it down with a t-shirt as needed.

Invest in a Tailored Suit

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If you’re in the market for a suit, make sure it’s tailored to fit you perfectly. Suits are expensive anyway so it’s better to spend a little extra on a tailor-fitted set than on one that slouches off you.

Go for Staple Suit Colors

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Unless you’re going to buy several suits, it’s best to go for a staple color that you can wear year round. This means either a navy blue set or one in dark charcoal, which will be suitable for all occasions and seasons.

Get a Pair of Checked Trousers

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Like retro sneakers, checked trousers are all the rage. Invest in a well-fitted pair in neutral shades like browns and grays. You can easily dress these up with a shirt and a blazer or dress them down with a sweater and a pair of classic sneakers.

Avoid Extreme Jeans Detailing

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Ripped jeans look great. Jeans that look like they’ve just been mauled by a bear? Not so much. If you’re going to get a pair of ripped jeans, avoid excessive rips that extend to both legs. Go for a pair with a slightly extreme rip on one leg while the other leg remains intact. Or go for something with only minimal rips on both legs. The same goes for other detailing like studs, patches, and wrinkle effects – less is more.

Get Classic Denim

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When it comes to denim, it’s best to go for classic colors and designs. Dark indigo or black jeans with minimal detailing would be a perfect choice. If you do want to go for a lighter color, don’t go overboard with extreme light wash jeans, which can be difficult to style.

Experiment With Layers

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Layering your outfit with a cardigan, a lightweight jacket, or a blazer is a great way to take your style up a notch. Or you could even go for a short-sleeved shirt during the warmer months. For winter, you could further explore various layering options such as sweaters and overcoats.

Go for Clean, Minimal Looks

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It’s easy to go wrong when there’s too much going on in your outfit. A flannel shirt with a graphic tee and a leather jacket on top may not be an easy look to pull off for everyone. You could end up looking like you’re trying too hard.

So while layers are important, don’t go overboard with them either. You should keep things simple at the beginning and go for clean and minimal looks with a single layer per outfit.

Experiment With Patterns

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Solid neutrals are always a safe outfit choice. But it can get boring after a while if you only wear solids for months on end. Experiment with patterns every now and then, and try going beyond stripes and checks. Even if you’re not too sure about wearing bold prints like florals, try searching for something in a color that isn’t too contrasting from the base color.

Make Patterns Work for You

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While patterns may be great for enhancing your outfit, the right patterns can also flatter your body type. So the best thing to do is to choose something that will serve both purposes. If you have a lanky figure, you could use broad checks to add some breadth and weight to your appearance. Vertical stripes, on the other hand, will slim you down and add some height to your appearance.

Avoid Pattern-Clashing

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Although patterns are an excellent addition to your wardrobe, too much of it can go horribly wrong. The safest move would be to avoid wearing more than one type of pattern in one outfit. Even if you must have one more type of pattern, make sure you only choose one that complements (not compete with) the first one.

Use the Occasional Accent Piece

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Accent pieces can immediately add some pop to an otherwise boring outfit. Look for scarves, shoes, hats, and jewelry that can give your outfit an instant boost. The only rule is that they have to look bold, color, or unique without being completely gaudy.

Know Where Your Trousers Should End

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A lot of men have no idea where their trousers should end. So they end up wearing a pair that either looks too small or too big for them. Your trousers should rest very lightly on the top of your shoes. In other words, there shouldn’t be a gap between your trouser cuffs and the top of your shoes. And the cuff shouldn’t cover your shoes either.

Don’t Buy Into Every Trend

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One of the biggest style mistakes is buying into each and every trend that comes out. This makes it harder to develop your own style and easier to commit drastic fashion blunders. Instead, you should carefully assess the latest trends and see if they’re something you can wear with your existing wardrobe pieces.

Most of all, consider whether you’d feel comfortable wearing them. If mixing sporty elements into your formalwear isn’t something that fits your personal style, for instance, you don’t have to force it.


READ: 27 Iconic Cardi B Styles The Internet Is Talking About

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These Are Some Of The Best Visual Contemporary Visual Artists Taking Over The Art World Right Now

culture

These Are Some Of The Best Visual Contemporary Visual Artists Taking Over The Art World Right Now

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Visual artistry today is filled with Latino artists of every age. While the world of Hollywood may be slow at showing the diversity and versatility of America, the art landscape doesn’t reflect that at all. In 2019, you can walk into any museum or gallery and witness vibrant works created by people that look like you and me.

Whether it be through photography, digital graphics, murals, or mixed media, the art world has never looked as beautiful as it does today, and that’s in large part because of talented and expressive Latino artists.

Here are some of our favorite Latino artists you should know about today.

Patrick Martinez

CREDIT: Instagram / patrick_martinez

Despite our own chaotic life or the injustices happening in our country, the work of Patrick Martinez always feels like a haven. Hip hop, street culture, and the community around him is an inspiration for the former student of Pasadena High School Visual Arts and Design. One of his most prominent attractions is his use of neon lights constructed into visual sculptures. Galleries all over the world have displayed his artwork.

Judy Baca

CREDIT: Instagram/@l0l0lita

The artwork of Judy Baca is an institution of Chicano culture. If you live in California or have visited, chances are you’ve seen her work. From the 2,400 feet long “Great Wall of Los Angeles” that is depicted along a flood control channel in the San Fernando Valley to the Cesar Chavez Memorial at San Jose State University, her murals are everywhere. She is also an art teacher and is showing the next generation of Latinx artists the incredible ways they can share our history.

Xochi Solis

CREDIT: Instagram/@xochisolis

At first glance, the art of Xochi Solis feels like warm flesh. Then as you get closer to it, the abstract pieces seem to resemble all of your favorite things in the world compacted on top of each other, almost like a sandwich. It may sound odd. However, her work is incredible. The Austin-based artist says she “considers the repeated act of layering a meditation on color, texture, and shape all leading to a greater awareness of the visual intricacies found in her immediate environment, both natural and cultural.”

Martine Gutierrez

CREDIT: Instagram/@ryanleegallery

“Society perpetuates rigid constructs—fabricated dichotomies like ‘male’ vs. ‘female’, ‘gay’ vs. ‘straight’, ‘minority’ vs. ‘white’, ‘reality’ vs. ‘fantasy’, ‘dominate’ vs. ‘submissive’, etc.,” Brooklyn-based artist Martine Gutierrez says. “But our interpretation of these constructs is subjective and not immutable. Reality, like gender, is ambiguous because it exists fluidly.” The artist’s work is as complex and stunning as identity itself.

Karlito Miller Espinosa

CREDIT: Instagram/@mataruda

Costa Rican artist, Karlito Miller-Espinosa, explores identity in the most brilliant way. His work above — two doormats that have “ni de aquí / ni de allá” instead of the words “welcome” — speaks to the heaviness he brings. “The mats are informed by the American policy Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) referencing a state of continuous deferment,” he states.

Ruben Guadalupe Marquez

CREDIT: Instagram/@broobs.psd

The work of Ruben Guadalupe Marquez went viral with his tragic but beautiful image of a Jakelin Ameí Rosmery Caal Maquin, the child that died in the custody of the Border Patrol. Since then we’ve been following his work intently on Instagram, where he highlights extraordinary people including Cyntoia Brown and Yalitza Aparicio Martínez with his signature collaging.

Alba Paramo

CREDIT: Instagram/@albaparamoart

“As a Mexican artist, my art is rooted in Latin American symbolism, mythology, literature, and cultural history,” Alba Páramo, a Guadalajara-born, New York-based artist states on her site. “The images that appear in my prints, drawings and paintings are interpretations of dreams about love, nature and the sacred connections between animals and human beings. They are representations of my vision and heritage as well as my deep interest in Tibetan art.”

#RodriguezCalero

CREDIT: Instagram/@critical.objects

We first experienced the work of Rodríguez Calero at an exhibition at the Museo del Barrio in New York City a couple of years ago. We instantly felt transported into some sort of alternative church where are welcomed. The Puerto Rican artist has a magical way of putting together images that look as if their whole intent on earth was to put together as one work of art.

Guadalupe Maravilla

CREDIT: Instagram/@drawingcenter

Our world doesn’t seem to make sense right now, but for some reason, the crazy and insane sculptures by Guadalupe Maravilla fit right in. According to Creative Capital, Maravilla “is a transdisciplinary artist who was part of the first wave of undocumented children to arrive at the United States border in the 1980s from Central America.”

José Parlá,

CREDIT: Instagram/@joseparla

Encountering the work of José Parlá, a graduate of Savannah College of Art and Design is like walking into a colorful galaxy. It’s larger than life, and we desperately wish we could simply walk into his massive murals. His work is everywhere, and if you live in New York City go to One World Trade Center and see it for yourself. 

Nani Chacon

CREDIT: Instagram/@nanibah

We’ve been following the work of Nina Chacon for quite some time. The artist, from New Mexico, paints the most stunning murals depicting Latinas, cholos, brown heroes, and so much more. Her work is a real wonder, and we hope she never stops painting.

Cara Romero

CREDIT: Instagram/@cararomerophotography

Photographer Cara Romero depicts the most authentic side to people and their passions. The California native who is now based in New Mexico has won several awards, according to her site, including ribbons at both major markets and the “Visions for the Future” award from the Native American Rights Fund.

Debi Hasky

CREDIT: Instagram/@debihasky

The flirty and feminist illustrations by Panamanian-American artist Debi Hasky bring to light women, powerful women. The artworks are statements of who we are, where we have been, and where we want to go. “Debi’s illustrations are all primarily based on personal experiences, such as her struggles with body love and examining what it is to be a woman today.”

Antonio Caro

CREDIT: Instagram/@lishik90

Colombian born conceptual artist, Antonio Caro, maybe pushing 70 but his artwork is as contemporary as they come. He’s kind of like our version of Andy Warhol — yes, it’s good. You can currently see his work for yourself at the Nasher Museum in Durham, North Carolina.

Favianna Rodriguez

CREDIT: Instagram/@favianna1

We recently covered the accomplishments of artist Favianna Rodriguez because her work was chosen for Ben & Jerry’s “Resistance” ice cream campaign. Her work represents our fight, our struggle, and our people.

“I love to inspire the next generation of artists,” Rodriguez wrote on her Instagram. “When I was a kid, I rarely saw images of myself across media and in museums, and that’s exactly WHY I became an artist. That’s why I advocate for art programs for kids, especially kids of color.

Laura Aguilar

CREDIT: Instagram/@latinx.in.da.south

While groundbreaking photographer Laura Aguilar died last year, her work will never be forgotten. She’s one of the very few Latina queer photographers who could capture subjects through a powerful lens. “She was saying ‘I’m going to show you this femininity in this landscape,'” Los Angeles Times staff writer Carolina Miranda said before Aguilar passed away. ‘”I’m going to show you brown-ness in this landscape, I’m going to show you queerness in this landscape.'”

Raúl de Nieves

CREDIT: Instagram/@norauls

Mexican artist Raúl de Nieves has a way with beads. He has taken a traditional form of art that has been practiced by indigenous people for centuries and transformed it into treasure. His work resembles what you’d find if you dove into the ocean, and God’s most precious things all gathered onto reefs. You can currently see his work at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Graciela Iturbide

CREDIT: Instagram/@gracielaiturbide

People describe the images of Graciela Iturbide have as “anti-picturesque” and “anti-folkloric.” However, they breathe light into the “anti” and give it beauty and authenticity. Her work has been displayed worldwide and can currently on view at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

Ronny Quevedo

CREDIT: Instagram/#RonnyQuevedo

What would a splash of perfection look like — if the splash is shaped perfectly in line and color? The answer would be Ronny Quevedo. The Ecuadoran, Yale grad, creates massive works of art that look as if they were engineered for the exact spot that they’re located. It’s that insane. He is currently an artist in residence at Smack Mellon in Brooklyn.

Aliza Nisenbaum

CREDIT: Instagram/@marymaryglasgow

Aliza Nisenbaum, a Mexican artist based in Brooklyn, is a realist. By that we mean she paints the real and the true. The work exudes raw emotion in each painting. She is currently Assistant Professor of Professional Practice in Visual Arts (Painting) Columbia University School of the Arts.


READ: 8 Texan Artists Take On Identity And Politics In New Exhibit 

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