Culture

After 50 Years Of Nourishing Our Minds, Sesame Street Is Officially A Place You Can Visit In New York City

Anyone who knows one of the most well known lines of the beloved theme song for “Sesame Street” (Can you tell me how to get, how to get to Sesame Street?) will be pumped about this new news.

In honor of the show’s 50th anniversary, the city given Sesame Street an official home. You can get there by stopping at the intersection of West 63rd Street and Broadway.

NYC mayor, Bill de Blasio, changed the name of the intersection in Manhattan at a ceremony on Wednesday.

Sesame icons Big Bird, Elmo, Bert, Ernie and all the others made an appearance at the ceremony where May 1st was also titled “Sesame Street Day.”

In a speech celebrating the event, de Blasio thanks the show for providing “fifty years of extraordinary programming, 50 years of making people’s lives better, 50 years of helping children believe in themselves.”

The PBS children’s TV show’s headquarters has been based out of New York City since 1969. It has also been between West 63rd and West 64th Streets. This time, on a “sunny day” you can take a visit and see the place that has helped nourish and captivate the minds of children for so many years.

As so many Latinos might remember, Sonia Manzano’s Maria played a massive part in make the show a staple for kids of colors. Sesame Street taught us about healthy eating, coping with loss and most importantly how to be a great friend. We wish you only sunny days in your retirement, friend. Thank you for the life lessons.

Maria taught us girls are badass.

Maria Sesame Street
Credit: PBS

It’s never too late.  Maria’s ultimate dream was to go back to school and become an astronaut.

And that motherhood is not shameful.

Maria Sesame Street
Credit: PBS

Call her the #FreeTheNipple pioneer.  After marrying Luis, Maria embraced motherhood and made it socially acceptable to talk about breastfeeding.

Though they’re addictive, we need to chill on eating cookies.

Maria Sesame Street Health Revised
Credit: PBS

Ya, we all love ’em, but Maria helped us, and Cookie Monster, realize sometimes we can skip a cookie or five.

Maria was real, even if it was tough.

DealwithLoss-w-text
Credit: PBS

When Mr. Hooper passed away in 1983, Maria was bravely honest with Big Bird and all of us.

She taught us how to be the best BFF ever.

Maria Sesame Street
Credit: PBS

Whether it was fixing someone’s toaster or door knob or kissing a booboo better, Maria was someone people could always count.

And that speaking Spanish was cool.

Credit: jonnytbirdzback/Youtube

Gracias por todas enseñanzas, Maria and “Sesame Street”!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Lil Nas X’s Next Big Drop Is A Children’s Book Called ‘C Is For Country’

Entertainment

Lil Nas X’s Next Big Drop Is A Children’s Book Called ‘C Is For Country’

Matt Winkelmeyer / Getty

Turns out Lil Nas X has more than just country rap up his sleeve. The 21-year-old “Old Town Road” rapper has a penchant for literature too.

On Tuesday, the rapper revealed that he’s written a children’s book called C Is for Country.

“I’m dropping the best kids’ book of all time soon!” the rapper shared in a Tweet earlier this week before adding that he couldn’t “wait to share it” with his fans and young readers.

Nas’s children’s book is being published under Random House Kids, a division of Penguin Random House. It is currently available for preorder on their site.

According to the Random House Kids’ website, the book is a story about Lil Nas X and Panini the pony.

“Join superstar Lil Nas X—who boasts the longest-running #1 song in history—and Panini the pony on a joyous journey through the alphabet from sunup to sundown. Experience wide-open pastures, farm animals, guitar music, cowboy hats, and all things country in this debut picture book that’s perfect for music lovers learning their ABCs and for anyone who loves Nas’s signature genre-blending style,” Random House describes in its explanation.

The book is illustrated by Theodore Taylor III and promises “plenty of hidden surprises for Nas’ biggest fans.”

C Is for County comes out Jan. 5.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Netflix’s Newest Musical Teen Hit Series Stars a 16-Year-Old Afro-Latina Newcomer

Entertainment

Netflix’s Newest Musical Teen Hit Series Stars a 16-Year-Old Afro-Latina Newcomer

A new teen series has dropped on Netflix that the internet can’t stop talking about. The newest cultural phenomenon that has hit the juggernaut streaming service is a musical series called Julie and the Phantoms, based on the 2011 Brazilian show of the same name.

The series follows a 16-year-old insecure girl named Julie who has lost her love of music after the tragic death of her mother. But with the help of a (stay with us here) band of musical ghosts she stumbles across in her garage, she soon re-discovers her love of singing and performing. Backed by her band of “phantoms”, Julie confidently takes the stage again, blowing everyone away in the process. ,

But the wacky, heartfelt story-line isn’t the only reason people are excited about the show. The buzz around the show is building because its star, 16-year-old newcomer Madison Reyes, is an Afro-Latina singer-actress of Puerto Rican descent.

View this post on Instagram

Que Bonita bandera 🇵🇷

A post shared by Madi 🇵🇷 (@themadisonreyes) on

Before landing the role of Julie, Reyes was just a regular shmegular Nuyorican girl going to high school in Brooklyn. Needless to say, the process of auditioning for Julie and the Phantoms was both a whirlwind and a game-changer.

“I found out about Julie and the Phantoms through my school. At first I was nervous to send my video in, but after talking to some friends, I sent it in and got a call back,” Reyes told Refinery 29. “From there it was just figuring out when I could fly to L.A. When I finally made it out there, the audition process lasted two days.”

Reyes, for one, understands the burden of her load. “[Julie] is Latin American, she’s got textured hair, she’s a strong and independent female character,” Reyes recently told the LA Times. “As a person of color who wants more diversity [on-screen], I’m kind of scared about the hate comments that I’ve seen other people have to go through, especially women.”

As if having an Afro-Latina actress at the center of a popular Netflix show wasn’t exciting enough, the series is also being helmed by Mexican-American director and all-around legend Kenny Ortega. For those of you unfamiliar with Ortega, he is the creative genius who directed bonafide classics like High School Musical and Hocus Pocus.

Ortega has been publicly effusive in his praise of Reyes. “She has this raw talent that can take on any genre of music, and this promise of greatness that excited everybody,” he told the LA Times. “And yet she’s so relatable and grounded.”

Fans are already calling for a second season after watching the cliffhanger season finale. Reyes, herself, can’t wait to get back in the shoes of Julie. When asked in an interview about where we’ll see her next, she responded: “Hopefully in the next season of Julie and the Phantoms!”. We second that wish.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com