Culture

These Latinx Queer Organizations Need Your Money More Than You Need Corporate Rainbow Socks

Come PRIDE month, we see every company from REI to Target slapping a rainbow on their brand to support the LGBTQ+ movement. That’s great–it’s always a comfort to see someone displaying a symbol of safety and inclusion.

However, we have to do more than that. The LGBTQ+ movement has certainly made strides since 1969, but we’re still being murdered in the streets and ejected out of our careers in the federal government. There isn’t enough space for us to have the same opportunities as straight folks, and the numbers get worse for queer people of color. So go buy those rainbow socks and then throw twenty bucks to one of these organizations supporting LGBTQ+ Latinos in other ways.

It Gets Better Project

@it_gets_better_project / Instagram

We saw a slew of celebrities in the last ten years join forces with the It Gets Better Project. Founded by Dan Savage in 2010, the social media campaign aims to highlight stories targeted toward LGBT youth to prove that it gets better. More than half of trans people attempt suicide at some point in their lives. We need this campaign.

Donate here.

The Trevor Project

@trevorproject / Instagram

After the Academy Awards honored short film “Trevor,” the Trevor Project has exploded to offer suicide hotline services to LGBTQ+ youth under 25 years of age. The organization has grown with the times to also offer webchat and text message services, saving lives 24/7.

Donate here.

The Los Angeles LGBT Center

Los Angeles LGBT Center / Facebook

Los Angeles is a city made of near majority Latinos, which means that the LA LGBT Center might be the most comprehensive health service provider of LGBT Latinos in the country. Not only does the center offer mental health services, housing for homeless youth, and job training for one of the most marginalized communities in the country, their advocacy team is actively getting bills passed that provide funding for these services.

Donate here.

The Trans Latina Coalition

@translatinacoalition / Instagram

Trans Latinas who immigrate to the U.S. to seek asylum from their probable murders in their home country arrive at Trump administration’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention centers for basic human rights abuses. The TLC is offering resources to trans Latinas in detention centers in California, Florida, Chicago, Texas, and the Washington areas.

Donate here if you think immigration is an LGBTQ+ issue.

The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network

@nqttcn / Instagram

If you’re a QPOC you know how impossible it is to find mental health resources that are culturally competent enough to actually treat our mental health needs resulting from discrimination. It’s infuriating. This organization offers an actual network of therapists and we need it to grow.

Donate here.

Pride Fund to End Gun Violence

@Pride_Fund / Twitter

This Political Action Committee (PAC) is supporting candidates who are demanding gun policy reform as informed by the fatalities the LGBT community grieves because of gun violence. The PAC was formed after the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando and has helped get folks into the positions of power needed to change gun laws.

Donate here.

Casa De Esperanza

@casa_de_esperanza / Instagram

Based in Minnesota, this group is working to end domestic violence in the Latinx community by offering shelter and hotline. More than 50 percent of queer Latinas have experienced physical violence, rape or stalking by their partners. This organization is working to respond to the needs of these women.

Donate here.

National Latina Institute For Reproductive Health

@NLIRH / Twitter

Caption: “Nearly 31% of Black women of reproductive age and 27% of Latinas of reproductive age are enrolled in #Medicaid.”

The NLIRH is a crucial element in understanding and preventing gender inequalities for Latinas, specifically. They are doing the research that nobody else will, to understand how brown women fair in reproductive justice. The group fights for abortion access and immigrant health rights and so much more.

Donate here.

Nalgona Positivity Pride

@nalgonapositivitypride / Instagram

If you can’t donate, you need to follow @nalgonapositivitypride to get indigenous body positivity in your feed. Founder Gloria Lucas is tapping into something we feel in our bones–the colonization of our minds and how living in a white society has created a crisis of eating disorders rampant among communities of color. The NPP offers educational resources and support groups for survivors.

Donate here.

Mijente

@conmijente / Instagram

Marisa Franco created Mijente to co-conspire campaigns for Latinx, Chicanx and Black rights. This is intersectionality at its finest, prioritizing queer, poor women of color through organizing. Don’t give up on organizing–it’s given us PRIDE!

Donate here.

Equality Federation

@equalityfed / Twitter

This Federation is organizing state-based organizations to target the federal government to meet LGBT people where they are. Just recently, they’ve demanded the government invest in public education and divest from privately run charter schools that preach abstinence and exclude LGBT history from their curriculums.

Donate here.

Casa Ruby

@CasaRubyDC / Twitter

Trans Salvadoreña Ruby Corado has created a safe space in Washington D.C. for LGBTQ youth. As trans youth begin to transition, the cost of clothing to adjust to their rapidly changing bodies is often too expensive for anyone to bear. Casa Ruby offers clothing exchanges, hot meals, and housing referrals, as well as legal counseling for youth.

Donate here.

These organizations give LGBTQ+ Latinx people somewhere to turn to. This is what PRIDE is all about.

READ: Boston Heteros Are Calling For A Straight Pride Parade And Twitter Is Not Having It

FIERCE LGBTQ Couples Are Sharing How They Met And It’s The Sweetest Thing

Fierce

FIERCE LGBTQ Couples Are Sharing How They Met And It’s The Sweetest Thing

Charles McQuillan / Getty

As we highlight Pride month, we wanted to share beautiful stories of LGBTQ+ love. To do so, we recently asked our FIERCE readers on Instagram to tell us how they met their partners and the results were not only hilarious but deeply inspiring.

Love is love and we love this kind of love.

Check it out!

The old slide in trick.

“I slid into the DMs.” – joanacanna

On their start to being ~educated latinas~

“My girlfriend and I met at the end of our first year of law school. She would say that I curved her for a few months before we became close. Almost three years later, we are both attorneys and looking forward to where life takes us.” – legalricanmujer

These two lovers who met while pushing for a joint interest

“We met in boot camp! 10 years ago (we’ve been together 2 /1/2 years, married 1 yr.” –hey_itsaj18

Chicas who started out on the same path and stuck together.

“We met in Nursing school we graduated together. That was 4 years ago, she’s a psychiatric nurse and I’m a geriatric nurse.” – m_a_r_i_a__j_o_h_a_n_n_a

They found love in a pandemic place.

Love in the time of Corona, thanks to Hinge!” – bienvenidarealidad__

Turns out the internet is the ultimate matchmaker.

“On the HER app. The same day she liked my profile she ended up coming into my job. I saw her but she didn’t see me. I ended up messaging her that night when I got off of work & we have been inseparable ever since. 3 years later and everyday I fall in love with her over & over again.” – _yourfavoritepoet_

And this is the most hilarious one of all.

“My wife @chulaworldand I were both seeing the same guy (total 🐶) …… so when we found out about each other we met up! And we have LITERALLY been inseparable ever since. Married on 4/20/19.” –bunuelitas

Here’s How You Can Help The Black Lives Matter Protesters Around The Country

Things That Matter

Here’s How You Can Help The Black Lives Matter Protesters Around The Country

Mario Tama / Getty Images

Social media has been filled with images of protests from across the country. Peaceful protesters have been beaten, shot with rubber bullets, choked with tear gas, and arrested by police officers. With hundreds of people arrested for protesting the murder of unarmed Black people by police officers, here’s how you can help.

How To Help Minneapolis

Minneapolis is the epicenter of the recent civil unrest in the U.S. following the death of George Floyd by police. Floyd was accused of trying to use a counterfeit $20 bill. Minneapolis police officers responded and fired police officer Derek Chauvin was caught on video kneeling on Floyd’s neck until he died. There were three officers on Floyd and he was cuffed as Chauvin kneeled on Floyd’s neck.

Official George Floyd Memorial Fund – Floyd’s family has started the Official George Floyd Memorial Fund to establish financial help for his family. The fund has raised more than $7 million. According to the text on the GoFundMe page, a portion of the money collected will go to caring for Floyd’s children and setting up educational funds for them. The family has a second fund started by his sister.

Minnesota Freedom Fund – The Minnesota Freedom Fund is using donations to pay bail for people arrested for protesting in Minneapolis. The fund was established to fight back against the cash bail system in the U.S. that disenfranchises people who can’t afford to pay to avoid being incarcerated before their trial.

How To Help New York

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by @mal.mero

A post shared by BLM Greater NY (@blmgreaterny) on

Brooklyn Community Bail Fund – The Brooklyn Community Bail Fund is using its current fundraising to help those arrested in New York while protesting. New York City was one of several American cities that saw widespread protests demanding justice for the killing of George Floyd.

How To Help Atlanta

The Action Network – Atlanta has seen sustained peaceful protests since George Floyd was killed. The Action Network is raising the funds now to help those in Atlanta pay for their bail if they are arrested while protesting in the state’s capital.

How To Help Chicago

Black Lives Matter, Chicago Chapter – The Black Lives Matter chapter of Chicago is asking for donations to maintain the organizing happening in the streets. The chapter has joined other chapters around the country in orchestrating major protests demanding police reform. Donations to the organization help to sustain them during this time.

How To Help Los Angeles

Peoples City Council Freedom Fund – Due to COVID-19, Los Angeles has set all bails to $0 to limit the spread of the virus in confined places, like jails. However, community leaders are monitoring to make sure that policy is still used for protesters. The Peoples City Council Freedom Fund is helping protesters by providing them legal support, medical bills, transportation, supplies, and protective gear to protesters.

How To Help Nationally

Credit: Mario Tama / Getty Images

Unicorn Riot – Unicorn Riot is an independent, nonprofit media organization offering on the ground reporting. According to the website, Unicorn Riot is free of corporate and government funding so they can cover stories as they see fit.

The Bail Project – The Bail Project is a bail fundraiser that is giving the same help nationally that many organizations offer locally. A donation to The Bail Project goes to helping people who are being arrested pay their bail anywhere int he country.

READ: Cardi B Has An Important Message About The Deaths Of George Floyd And Breonna Taylor