Culture

These Latinx Queer Organizations Need Your Money More Than You Need Corporate Rainbow Socks

Come PRIDE month, we see every company from REI to Target slapping a rainbow on their brand to support the LGBTQ+ movement. That’s great–it’s always a comfort to see someone displaying a symbol of safety and inclusion.

However, we have to do more than that. The LGBTQ+ movement has certainly made strides since 1969, but we’re still being murdered in the streets and ejected out of our careers in the federal government. There isn’t enough space for us to have the same opportunities as straight folks, and the numbers get worse for queer people of color. So go buy those rainbow socks and then throw twenty bucks to one of these organizations supporting LGBTQ+ Latinos in other ways.

It Gets Better Project

@it_gets_better_project / Instagram

We saw a slew of celebrities in the last ten years join forces with the It Gets Better Project. Founded by Dan Savage in 2010, the social media campaign aims to highlight stories targeted toward LGBT youth to prove that it gets better. More than half of trans people attempt suicide at some point in their lives. We need this campaign.

Donate here.

The Trevor Project

@trevorproject / Instagram

After the Academy Awards honored short film “Trevor,” the Trevor Project has exploded to offer suicide hotline services to LGBTQ+ youth under 25 years of age. The organization has grown with the times to also offer webchat and text message services, saving lives 24/7.

Donate here.

The Los Angeles LGBT Center

Los Angeles LGBT Center / Facebook

Los Angeles is a city made of near majority Latinos, which means that the LA LGBT Center might be the most comprehensive health service provider of LGBT Latinos in the country. Not only does the center offer mental health services, housing for homeless youth, and job training for one of the most marginalized communities in the country, their advocacy team is actively getting bills passed that provide funding for these services.

Donate here.

The Trans Latina Coalition

@translatinacoalition / Instagram

Trans Latinas who immigrate to the U.S. to seek asylum from their probable murders in their home country arrive at Trump administration’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention centers for basic human rights abuses. The TLC is offering resources to trans Latinas in detention centers in California, Florida, Chicago, Texas, and the Washington areas.

Donate here if you think immigration is an LGBTQ+ issue.

The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network

@nqttcn / Instagram

If you’re a QPOC you know how impossible it is to find mental health resources that are culturally competent enough to actually treat our mental health needs resulting from discrimination. It’s infuriating. This organization offers an actual network of therapists and we need it to grow.

Donate here.

Pride Fund to End Gun Violence

@Pride_Fund / Twitter

This Political Action Committee (PAC) is supporting candidates who are demanding gun policy reform as informed by the fatalities the LGBT community grieves because of gun violence. The PAC was formed after the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando and has helped get folks into the positions of power needed to change gun laws.

Donate here.

Casa De Esperanza

@casa_de_esperanza / Instagram

Based in Minnesota, this group is working to end domestic violence in the Latinx community by offering shelter and hotline. More than 50 percent of queer Latinas have experienced physical violence, rape or stalking by their partners. This organization is working to respond to the needs of these women.

Donate here.

National Latina Institute For Reproductive Health

@NLIRH / Twitter

Caption: “Nearly 31% of Black women of reproductive age and 27% of Latinas of reproductive age are enrolled in #Medicaid.”

The NLIRH is a crucial element in understanding and preventing gender inequalities for Latinas, specifically. They are doing the research that nobody else will, to understand how brown women fair in reproductive justice. The group fights for abortion access and immigrant health rights and so much more.

Donate here.

Nalgona Positivity Pride

@nalgonapositivitypride / Instagram

If you can’t donate, you need to follow @nalgonapositivitypride to get indigenous body positivity in your feed. Founder Gloria Lucas is tapping into something we feel in our bones–the colonization of our minds and how living in a white society has created a crisis of eating disorders rampant among communities of color. The NPP offers educational resources and support groups for survivors.

Donate here.

Mijente

@conmijente / Instagram

Marisa Franco created Mijente to co-conspire campaigns for Latinx, Chicanx and Black rights. This is intersectionality at its finest, prioritizing queer, poor women of color through organizing. Don’t give up on organizing–it’s given us PRIDE!

Donate here.

Equality Federation

@equalityfed / Twitter

This Federation is organizing state-based organizations to target the federal government to meet LGBT people where they are. Just recently, they’ve demanded the government invest in public education and divest from privately run charter schools that preach abstinence and exclude LGBT history from their curriculums.

Donate here.

Casa Ruby

@CasaRubyDC / Twitter

Trans Salvadoreña Ruby Corado has created a safe space in Washington D.C. for LGBTQ youth. As trans youth begin to transition, the cost of clothing to adjust to their rapidly changing bodies is often too expensive for anyone to bear. Casa Ruby offers clothing exchanges, hot meals, and housing referrals, as well as legal counseling for youth.

Donate here.

These organizations give LGBTQ+ Latinx people somewhere to turn to. This is what PRIDE is all about.

READ: Boston Heteros Are Calling For A Straight Pride Parade And Twitter Is Not Having It

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

The Cast of ‘Glee’ Along With Demi Lovato Paid Tribute to Naya Rivera At the GLAAD Awards

Entertainment

The Cast of ‘Glee’ Along With Demi Lovato Paid Tribute to Naya Rivera At the GLAAD Awards

Photo via Getty

On Thursday, the cast of “Glee” paid tribute to Naya Rivera at the GLAAD Media Awards. Rivera was a once-in-a-lifetime talent the touched so many lives personally and through the screen while she was alive. But perhaps none of Naya’s roles were as impactful as Santana Lopez was.

This year, GLAAD decided to take time to honor the impact Naya Rivera had on LGBTQ representation onscreen.

During a time when LGBTQ represenation onscreen was rare, Santana Lopez was groundbreaking for being both queer and Latina. Santana went from a shut-off closeted cheerleader to an out-and-proud lesbian woman. This was a story arc many queer kids had never seen before.

Demi Lovato introduced the cast of “Glee” with a touching speech. She described how honored she was (and still is) to have played Santana’s girlfriend, Dani, on the show.

“I don’t have to tell you that this year was a tough, tough year,” Lovato said. “A particular moment of heartbreak stands out for me: losing my friend Naya Rivera. I will always cherish the chance I got to play Naya’s girlfriend, Dani, on ‘Glee.’”

“The character Naya played, Santana Lopez, was groundbreaking for closeted queer girls — like I was at the time,” she went on. “And her ambition and accomplishments inspired Latina women all over the world.”

Then, dozens of former “Glee” cast members gathered via Zoom to pay tribute to Naya Rivera.

The tribute featured former “Glee” actors like Darren Criss, Jane Lynch, Matthew Morrison, Amber Riley, Heather Morris, Harry Shum Jr., Jenna Ushkowitz, Chris Colfer, and Kevin McHale. There were also many others.

“Naya would be honored to receive this recognition,” read the statement. “When Naya was told that Santana would be a lesbian she called me to let me know and I asked her how did she feel about that and she said ‘I feel great about it!'”

“This year marks the tenth anniversary that Naya’s character, Santana Lopez, came out on ‘Glee’,” said Dot-Marie Jones, who played Coach Beast on the Fox series.

“Santana basically got disowned by her family. And as alot of us know, that’s a feeling too many LGBTQ kids know too well,” continued Chris Colfer, who played Kurt Hummel.

The loving tribute then ended with a written statement from Naya Rivera’s mother Yolanda Previtire, who couldn’t make it to the call.

“Little did we know that she would impact so many people in the LGBTQ community. Her desire was to always be an advocate to those who did not have a voice.

“She continued: “I don’t believe that she realized how important she was to this world. I am grateful that my eldest daughter helped to change the landscape of how we view and see each other.”

“Her desire was to always be an advocate to those who did not have a voice,” the message read, in part. “I don’t believe that she realized how important she was to this world. I am grateful that my eldest daughter helped to change the landscape of how we view and see each other.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Selena Gomez Tells Senate to Pass Equality Act, Credits Gay Community with Launching Her Music Career

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Tells Senate to Pass Equality Act, Credits Gay Community with Launching Her Music Career

After the Equality Act was recently passed in the House, Selena Gomez is now telling the Senate to pass the bill that would give added federal protections to the LGBTQ+ community. The Mexican-American pop star also talked about her history with the gay community and how they helped support her music career.

The Equality Act would extend protections from the Civil Rights Act to the LGBTQ+ community.

The Equality Act was first introduced in 2015. The bill would amend the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to extend protections against discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity when it came to employment, housing, education, and other public and federal accommodations. In 2019, the Senate under President Donald Trump refused to vote on the bill.

The Equality Act recently passed through the House and now Gomez wants the Senate to pass it as well.

In February, the Equality Act was reintroduced to the House of Representatives. The bill passed through the House for a second time on Feb. 25. In a recent interview with the Recording Academy, the institution that hosts the Grammy Awards, Gomez is telling the Senate to vote on the bill this time and pass it through.

“We’ve come a long way in the last 10 years, but we have so much further to go,” Gomez said about the progress of LGBTQ+ rights in the country. “The Senate must pass the Equality Act. It’s absurd that this is even being debated in 2021.”

Gomez says the gay community helped support her 2009 breakthrough hit “Naturally.”

While Gomez was promoting her Latin music EP Revelación, she also revisited a few of her past hits. In 2009, she launched her music career with her band The Scene. Later that year, Gomez got her first top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with her breakthrough smash “Naturally.” While talking about her relationship with the gay community, she says they were the first ones to show that song love.

“Earlier you mentioned my song ‘Naturally’ and I remember when it was released, it truly started getting played in the gay bars before anywhere else,” she said. “I would hear from older friends that they heard when they went out. I was so jealous that I was too young to be out and dancing to it with everyone. The LGBTQ+ community has been there for me and I don’t take them for granted.”

The Equality Act is waiting to be debated by the Senate. This is Gomez’s first time speaking in support of the bill. Last year, she launched the Black Equality Fund to support groups like the Movement for Black Lives.  In March, she also asked for the Senate to pass the People Act.

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Selena Gomez and Myke Towers’ “Dámelo To’” is Everything: Listen to the ‘Revelación’ Standout

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com