Culture

The Coronavirus Has Changed Our Holiday Plans But Posadas Are Adapting To The ‘Nueva Normal’

For many Latinos, the word posada, evokes chilly nights surrounded by family and friends, singing, enjoying a warm meal (of tamales and ponche, of course), and spreading holiday cheer all around. If you have never been lucky enough to be invited to one of these celebrations, you know just how special these parties are.

Obviously, 2020 is totally different. The Coronavirus pandemic has completely changed our typical holiday plans and forced us to rethink our annual traditions. In some places, such as Mexico City, posadas are explicitly banned out of the risk that they’ll increase COVID-19 infections.

But from going digital to keeping it in the home, families are adopting to the new normal and helping keep the tradition alive.

Posadas are a huge part of the holiday season, but this year they’re canceled.

Posadas involve a reenactment of Joseph and Mary’s search for a shelter where the Virgin Mary could safely give birth to Jesus in Bethlehem.

Posadas are a distinctly Mexican Catholic tradition, which is also celebrated all over Latin America and even across the world.

The tradition has spread to places like Colombia, Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salavador, and many other Latin American countries, but it originated in Mexico as a Spanish celebration used by friars to convert indigenous people into Catholicism.

Posadas are a celebration of the novenario before Christmas.

‘Novenario’ means nine days, which means that posadas take place during the nine days before Christmas Eve. The nine days running up to Christmas, represent the nine months of The Virgin Mary’s pregnancy.

In Colombia, this period of time is called ‘La Novena’, and it’s turned into a celebration similar to posadas but that in Colombia, Venezela and Ecuador is known as ‘La Novena de Aguinaldos’.

Posadas in Mexico began as a way for the Spaniards to force Indigenous people to celebrate Christmas.

During the nine days leading up to Christmas Day, masses would include representations of Mary and Joseph. Following mass, there would be a party where people were blindfolded before hitting a piñata with a stick, a representation of faith defeating temptation with the help of virtue. The fruits and sweets that poured out of the piñata represented the joys of union with God.

At the beginning of a posada, people are divided in two groups, the ones “outside” representing Mary and Joseph, and the ones “inside” representing innkeepers.

Then everyone sings the posada litany together, re-enacting Mary and Joseph’s search, going back and forth until they are finally “admitted” to an inn. After this traditional part, the actual party starts. Posadas have spread to other countries — such as Guatemala, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela; and the celebrations vary by location.

Piñatas are a quintessential part of posadas.

Although they have mostly lost their original religious meaning, piñatas remain an essential part of las posadas. Mexico. Piñatas come in all shapes and sizes, but star shaped pinatas are the ones traditionally used in posadas.

In fact, these star-shaped piñata’s 7 points represent the seven deadly sins. Most Mexicans are catholic and piñatas were a way to teach children about religion in a fun way. Piñatas represent being tempted by evil and the tradition of hitting them blindfolded symbolizes overcoming evil through blind faith.

At the end of the litany, when the innkeeper finally decides to give Mary and Joseph a place to stay; both parties celebrate.

As per tradition, the pilgrims carry colored candles and sparklers that symbolize the light that leads the way to the manger, and everyone gets to light sparklers in celebration at the end of the litany. After the litanies and the pilgrimage are over, everyone goes back to the house, where the real party starts.

Obviously, this year all of that will look different. Many organizations that typically host large posada events are now turning to the Internet to host virtual posasdas. And families are planning on using Zoom and other webcam services to stay in touch with families amid the holidays.

How do you plan on celebrating this year?

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Tourists To Mexico Are Getting COVID And Are Shocked They Can’t Return To U.S.

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Tourists To Mexico Are Getting COVID And Are Shocked They Can’t Return To U.S.

Since late-January, the United States has required a negative COVID test from anyone traveling to the U.S., including tourists returning from vacation in Mexico. So, what happens when you test positive while in a foreign country?

Well, many U.S. tourists are finding out the dark side of traveling during a global pandemic as those who test positive for the virus aren’t being allowed back into the country. And they are outraged.

U.S. tourists shocked they can’t return to the U.S. with a positive COVID test.

Even though the government has made it very clear that anyone traveling to the U.S. will require a negative COVID-19 test (at least anyone over the age of 2), many U.S. tourists abroad are shocked they’re not able to return to their home country once they’ve caught the virus.

Korey Mudd, who was on vacation in Cancun when he tested positive, told USA Today, he couldn’t believe this was happening. “It would have been better just to stay home, for sure, unfortunately,” he said.

The hotel initially told him he had to stay until he tested negative, which freaked Mudd out since people who get the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 can test positive long after they’ve recovered from the virus. The resort they stayed at, which covers the cost of the extended stay for travelers stranded by COVID-19, eventually settled on 10 days after his first test if he had no symptoms.

The U.S. implemented the testing requirement shortly after President Biden took office.

Since late January, anyone traveling to the United States is required to provide a negative COVID-19 test or proof of vaccination or recovery from the virus. However, this new requirement hasn’t stemmed the flow of tourists from the U.S. traveling to Mexico amid the pandemic, hoping to escape the tighter lockdowns that exist in some parts of the U.S.

But if you’re abroad and test positive, you can’t fly home until you are cleared by a doctor or provide proof of a negative test. Hotel and airline interpretations of the CDC rules vary, but travelers who’ve been stuck say they were told between 10 and 14 days in isolation.

When the requirement was announced on Jan. 12, travelers rushed to cancel plans or shift their vacation plans to U.S. vacation spots that don’t require COVID-19 tests. But the bookings rebounded as some hotels announced free testing and a free quarantine stay if they tested positive and vaccination rates have increased.

Do you need a test to fly?

Travelers don’t need a COVID-19 test to fly to Mexico, but they can’t board a flight back to the United States from the country or any international destination without showing a negative test taken no more than three days before departure or proof of recovery from COVID-19.

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From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

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From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

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One of the big surprises of the 2020 election was how even though most Latino voters across the U.S. voted for Joe Biden, in some counties of competitive states like Florida and Texas, a higher-than-expected percentage of Latinos supported Donald Trump. One factor that many believe played a role: online misinformation about the Democratic candidate.

Another important subject that’s been victim of a massive misinformation campaign is the Coronavirus pandemic and the ongoing vaccination program. But why does #fakenews so heavily target the Latino community?

Since the 2020 campaign, a large misinformation campaign has target Latinos.

Although fake news is nothing new, in the campaign leading up to the 2020 elections it morphed into something more sinister – a campaign to influence Latino voters with false information. The largely undetected movement helped depress turnout and spread disinformation about Democrat Joe Biden.

The effort showed how social media and other technology can be leveraged to spread misinformation so quickly that those trying to stop it cannot keep up. There were signs that it worked as Donald Trump swung large numbers of Latino votes in the 2020 presidential race in some areas that had been Democratic strongholds.

Videos and pictures were doctored. Quotes were taken out of context. Conspiracy theories were fanned, including that voting by mail was rigged, that the Black Lives Matter movement had ties to witchcraft and that Biden was beholden to a cabal of socialists.

That flow of misinformation has only intensified since Election Day, researchers and political analysts say, stoking Trump’s baseless claims that the election was stolen and false narratives around the mob that overran the Capitol. More recently, it has morphed into efforts to undermine vaccination efforts against the coronavirus.

The misinformation campaign could have major impacts on our politics.

Several misinformation researchers say there is an alarming amount of misinformation about voter fraud and Democratic leaders being shared in Latino social media communities. Biden is a popular target, with misinformation ranging from exaggerated claims that he embraces Fidel Castro-style socialism to more patently false and outlandish ones, for instance that the president-elect supports abortion minutes before a child’s birth or that he orchestrated a caravan of Cuban immigrants to infiltrate the US Southern border and disrupt the election process.

Democratic strategists looking ahead to the 2022 midterm elections are concerned about how this might sway Latino voters in the future. They acknowledge that conservatives in traditional media and the political establishment have pushed false narratives as well, but say that social media misinformation deserves special attention: It appears to be a growing problem, and it can be hard to track and understand.

Some believe that Latinos may be more likely to believe a message shared by friends, family members, or people from their cultural community in a WhatsApp or Telegram group rather than an arbitrary mainstream US news outlet; research has found that people believe news articles more when they’re shared by people they trust.

Fake news is also impacting our community’s response to the pandemic.

Vaccination programs work best when as many people as possible get vaccinated, but Latinos in the United States are getting inoculated at lower rates.

In Florida, for example, Latinos are 27% of the population but they’ve made up only about 17% of COVID-19 vaccinations so far, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. And Latinos are relying on social media and word-of-mouth for information on vaccines — even when it’s wrong. There’s myths circulating around the vaccine, whether you can trust it and the possible the long-term effects.

And it’s not just obstacles to getting information in Spanish, but also in many of the native Mayan indigenous languages that farmworkers speak in South Florida.

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