Culture

‘Playboy’ Mexico Is Making History With The First Ever Trans Woman On Its Cover

Playboy has long been an advocate for underrepresented communities. The world-famous publication has featured Black women, disabled women, and trans women long before society had deemed it ‘appropriate.’

Some of the magazines covers have caused such controversy for being so ‘ahead of their time’ that they were often pulled and banned from stores’ shelves.

In Mexico, that history is no different. The Mexican version of Playboy has made history once again by featuring for the first time ever a trans woman on its cover.

Playboy Mexico has featured a trans woman on its cover for the first time ever.

Hoping to support the battles for openness and diversity that are fought by so many across Mexico, Playboy Mexico has just launched a special issue that, in addition to breaking with gender stereotypes, will be a milestone within the LGBTQ community.

For the first time in the magazine’s history, a trans woman appears on the cover. Her name is Victoria Volkova, lifestyle and beauty influencer and YouTube star.

In launching the history-making edition, the magazine said, “Playboy Mexico, in line with its parent company in the United States, has always been in favor of all social struggles. We invite you to explore this edition that will undoubtedly become one of the favorites in your collection.”

“This cover celebrates the different ways of being a woman, the different ways of being beautiful, and the different ways of exploring your sensuality…,” said Volkova from her Instagram account where she also recounted her difficult process to reach acceptance of her body and who she is.

Volkova also expressed that she hoped the magazine could help make people educated on the conditions that trans people face in a country like Mexico and across the world.

“I hope that with this cover people are more curious to meet each other, to know what it is like to be a trans person, how we live and what we have to go through to live a dignified life, to be respected, to earn a living, to be listened to, to survive in this society that does not pay attention to us or our struggles,” she said.

Victoria Volkova is an outspoken and respected advocate for the country’s LGBTQ community.

Credit: VICOVOLKOV / Instagram

Victoria Volkova is a 27-year-old influencer from the Mexican state of Querétaro. She’s become most famous as someone who uses her platform to give advice on lifestyles and beauty. Her YouTube channel and Instagram each have more than a million followers.

She has been a constant fighter for the rights of Mexico’s LGBTQ community, especially when it comes to the inclusion and rights of transgender and transsexual people, mainly using her platform to speak out on behalf of the community.

In addition to being an entrepreneur, she has also positioned herself against sexist violence and has managed to be part of the trans struggle. Likewise, Victoria Volkova has a sister who is also an influencer and creates content for the video channel ‘Lenguas de Gato.’

Playboy has long been inclusive in their magazines around the world – but so much more work remains.

This is not the first time that a trans woman has starred on a Playboy cover worldwide. That honor goes to Caroline Cossey who became the first transgender woman to appear in the magazine in 1991, and in 2017 Ines Rau was the second. In 2018, the German edition featured trans model and activist Giuliana Farfalla.

Rau told Playboy being named a Playmate is a good way to speak her own truth. “When I was doing this shoot, I was thinking of all those hard days in my childhood,” she said in the magazine. “And now everything happening gives me so much joy and happiness. I thought, Am I really going to be a Playmate—me? It’s the most beautiful compliment I’ve ever received. It’s like getting a giant bouquet of roses.”

Playboy has a long history of shining a light on social struggles and telling the stories of trans women and women of color all around the world.

Cooper Hefner, son of the late Hugh Hefner and current chief creative officer of Playboy, tweeted Wednesday that the magazine, and society at large should “be fighting for a more open world, not one that promotes hatred and a lack of acceptance.”

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Topo Chico Just Released Its Alcoholic Hard Seltzer Lineup And It’s Already On People’s Shopping Lists

Culture

Topo Chico Just Released Its Alcoholic Hard Seltzer Lineup And It’s Already On People’s Shopping Lists

Topo Chico / Coca Cola Company

It’s safe to say that pretty much anything sparkly is having a moment. What started off as the sparkling water craze a few years ago with brands like LaCroix and Bubly, has now moved onto hard seltzer.

With all the commotion it’s hard not to miss the fizzy drink sensation taking over our mini-fridges and supermercados across the country. Now, Coca Cola (which owns iconic the iconic Mexican brand, Topo Chico) is getting in on the trend with its own Topo Chico hard seltzer.

And although I’m not one to usually follow trends, this one seems like one that many of us will want to get behind.

Topo Chico is stepping it up with a new line of alcoholic hard seltzers.

Following in the footsteps of hard seltzer mega weights like White Claw and Truly, Topo Chico is hoping to capitalize on its cult like status with the release of its new hard seltzer lineup.

The iconic Mexican brand (based out of Monterrey but now owned by Coca Cola Co.) has officially launched its debut line of hard seltzer drinks in several countries around the world.

It’s also worth noting because this marks the first time time in years that Coca Cola will be selling alcoholic beverages. The soda giant sold off its wine business in 1983, per the Wall Street Journal. This will be the first time in decades that the beverage giant sells alcohol in the U.S. — and what a fitting time to do so.

So far, the hard seltzer is available in Brazil and Mexico and will hit U.S. shelves in early 2021.

Rightfully so, Topo Chico is initially rolling out the product in Latin America with Mexico City, Puebla, Acapulco, Tijuana, Guadalajara and Monterrey getting the product in Mexico; while Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo will get it in Brazil.

As far as flavors, we’re looking forward to three gluten-free ones, including Tangy Lemon Lime, Strawberry Guava, and Pineapple Twist. The packaging is cool too: the hard seltzer ships in sleep aluminum cans.

And the new drinks are expected to live up to their namesake with a 4.7% alcohol by volume (which is higher than most beers) and just 100 calories per can.

A Coca Cola spokesperson said in a statement that “Topo Chico Hard Seltzer will appeal to drinkers who are looking for a refreshing, lighter alternative to other higher-calorie, higher-sugar alcoholic beverages. Most hard seltzer fans are migrating from beer, so this growth will be incremental to our business.”

Topo Chico only just recently expanded across the U.S. but it’s long been a favorite in Mexico.

Topo Chico has long been a popular water brand across Mexico and in a handful of U.S. states. It’s already carved out a niche market that has made it a cult favorite in places like Austin, TX. Popular for it’s “throwback image” and cool design, Topo Chico has seen massive growth, over the last year U.S. sales jumped 39 percent to nearly $130 million, according to data from IRI, a Chicago-based market research firm.

The secret behind Topo Chico is its mythical origins. The water is sourced from a limestone spring concealed under a mountain in northeastern Mexico. The drink was built on a legend of the thermal waters of the Cerro del Topo Chico, which is where the drink got its name. The story goes that the hidden spring water cured an Aztec princess’ illness. While there’s no way to verify the myth, Topo Chico indeed does come from the same underground spring since 1895.

And as the brand gains recognition across the U.S., it seems only natural that the company would start to add more products to its lineup. In fact, recently the company also released a “lemon-lime” version of its water that’s very much like a limonada.

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Elon Musk Wanted To Call His Tequila Brand ‘Teslaquila’ But Mexico Said No

Culture

Elon Musk Wanted To Call His Tequila Brand ‘Teslaquila’ But Mexico Said No

Tesla Tequila

Tesla Tequila is real? That’s the question many people are asking themselves after the recent announcement that the elixir was indeed available to buy on the company’s website.

Many assumed it was all a publicity stunt or a Twitter joke by the eccentric Tesla founder…looks like we are all wrong. Turns out we probably shouldn’t of doubted him. He’s already gotten people to buy flamethrowers, short shorts and surfboards. Guess it was only natural that the billionaire’s next move would be tequila.

Only one problem: tequila is a well protected and regulated beverage that’s overseen by Mexican officials. So although he’s released his so-called Tesla Tequila, he didn’t get to call it what he had wanted to, thanks to Mexican regulators.

Mexican officials told Elon Musk no to his ‘Teslaquila’ brand.

It was more than two years ago that Elon Musk referenced the “Teslaquilla” (yes, with two Las) idea. It came in the form of an April Fool’s Day joke, with Musk writing, “Elon was found passed out against a Tesla Model 3, surrounded by ‘Teslaquilla’ bottles, the tracks of dried tears still visible on his cheeks.”

But thanks to Mexican regulators, Musk has had to change his approach. Although he launched his tequila brand over in November, he didn’t get to call it what he had hoped to call it.

Thanks to strict controls on naming and production of tequila, Musk’s tequila brand is now called Tesla Tequila. Mexico’s Tequila Regulatory Council rejected the name for being too confusing for a brand name, since it’s close to the word “tequila.” 

The word “tequila” is a designation of origin; it means the rights of using this word belong only to the tequila agribusiness. That also means no one can register the word as their property. Musk’s team challenged this, saying “Teslaquila” was a natural variant from Tesla and the suffix “-quila.” On January 16th, the final ruling came down: the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property declared it could not register the brand.

Although Musk couldn’t launch ‘teslaquila’, he’s moved fast on Tesla Tequila.

Despite the naming setback, Musk has been hard at work at getting his tequila brand off the ground. And just last month, products started to ship.

Tesla Tequila comes in a lightning bolt-shaped bottle and, according to the label, is an “exclusive, premium 100% de agave tequila añejo aged in French oak barrels” produced by Nosotros Tequila.

The liquor boasts “a dry fruit and light vanilla nose with a balanced cinnamon pepper finish” and a Tesla-branded stand to hold the angular glass container upright. Despite limiting orders to two bottles per customer and only shipping to certain U.S. states, the car-brand tequila still sold out within a matter of hours. And it’s going for $250 a pop.

And in case you’re wondering, Mexico ain’t mad about it. “Today the tequila industry has someone as important as Elon Musk representing it,” the CRT said in a statement. “This is, without a doubt, a benefit to all the tequila producers because he is giving his image as an important businessman and he is showing he wants to comply with the rules of this industry. We welcome Elon Musk and the Tesla tequila brand.”

People are already receiving their shipments and posting to social media.

People who ordered the tequila are beginning to receive their shipments, and some are sharing photos on social media.

“It’s finally here and it’s so sexy!” wrote one Twitter user.

This isn’t the first time that Tesla’s owner has raised eyebrows for strange business ventures.

From flamethrowers to surf boards and now tequila, Musk has launched all types of products, apart from his iconic Tesla vehicles.

Earlier this year, the company took to selling mini red gym shorts on its website, in a playful hit back at investors who had “shorted” Tesla, or bet that its stock would drop. Each pair was priced at $69.420.

Musk also made headlines this week by revealing how close the automaker was from bankruptcy at one point. In response to a question on Twitter, he said that Tesla was only “about a month” away from collapse when it was working to ramp up production for its popular Model 3 sedan from mid-2017 to mid-2019.

However, what ever he’s doing seems to be working for the company since none of those struggles are reflected in its stock price. Tesla shares have been on a tear this year, shooting up more than 420%.

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