Culture

The Mexican Government Tried To Say Pinche Gringo BBQ’s Name Was Too Vulgar, But They Won A Case Letting Them Keep It

Six years ago, United States native Dan DeFossey and Mexican Roberto Luna took a chance when they opened a BBQ restaurant in the Mexico City neighborhood of Narvarte. Their idea was simple in thought, create a food environment where both U.S. food and Mexican culture meet. It was an idea that was rooted in building a bridge between both countries in increasingly divided times. 

“We want to be a cultural center where we offer a variety of activities and a bridge between Mexico and the United States,” DeFossey told Mexican newspaper El Economista back in March. “We want to send a message that there is no wall between us. This place is a letter of friendship between Mexico and my country.”

While the restaurant has seen success and has even opened a second location in Anáhuac, there has also been controversy that until recently put Defossy and Luna in legal trouble. That is mainly due to their restaurant’s name, Pinche Gringo BBQ.

The controversy stemmed from Article 4 of the Industrial Property Law in Mexico that states that “a brand cannot be registered if it is deemed to be contrary to the morals and good manners of society.” In this case the word “Pinche.”

Credit: pinchegringobbq / Instagram

The ordeal started about five years ago when Defossy and Luna attempted to register the restaurant’s name but immediately faced legal challenges. This stemmed from the use of the word “pinche”, essentially meaning “damn” but also used as an offensive term, in its business name.

The term was found offensive and not suitable for registering according to Article 4 of the Industrial Property Law (LPI) prohibits the registration of brands whose contents or form are contrary to the morals and good customs of society. The two didn’t agree with the decision and launched a five-year legal battle to register its name. 

Defossy and Luna put forth two factors to defend the use of the name. Both made the argument that “pinche” is also used in some parts of the restaurant industry to describe “kitchen assistant” in formal Spanish. The term is also part of the fabric of the restaurant’s mission in creating  “fraternity and camaraderie between citizens of the United States and Mexico.”

“From a gastronomic point of view, the word pinche refers to a cook . . .” Alejandro Luna de Olivares, the owners’ lawyer,  old the magazine Forbes México.

After a long legal battle, the restaurant was allowed to keep it’s popular name after the courts ruled in their favor.   

Credit: pinchegringobbq / Instagram

“. . . The case reached a collegiate district court and our main argument was that the fourth article of the law is against the constitution because IMPI must not be the arbitrator of morals and good manners,” Luz Elena Elías, another lawyer who represented Pinche Gringo restaurant, told the Mexico Daily News. “In the end, the court ruled in our favor,” she said, noting that the court decision sets a precedent for the use of the term “pinche” in a brand going forward. 

Defossy and Luna are happy to put this legal trouble in the rearview mirror and continue to grow their restaurant chain. This also means they can finally make products with the business’s name, which was previously not an option due to the pending legal case. 

“The future is very bright. We have a lot of ideas to grow Pinche Gringo. We have plans to open a luxury restaurant with . . . more gourmet food but with a casual atmosphere,” DeFossey said. “What matters most to us with the concept of El Pinche Gringo is to bring about a change and I think we’re achieving it.”

That change goes beyond just their name but how the business is run from the inside out. That starts with the more than 100 employees whom a large majority are Mexicans who were deported from the U.S. after living the majority of their lives there. This is part of El Pinche Gringo’s philosophy and a testament of what they believe in building bridges not walls. 

“When someone comes into this house [El Pinche Gringo] it’s as if they’ve arrived in Austin, Texas, and for two hours you have the chance to get up close to a little bit of the food and culture of the United States in an environment where social classes or where you come from don’t matter,” DeFossey says. “When you leave, you return to Mexico, my country for the last 10 years.”

READ: He Was Injured In The Hard Rock Hotel Collapse And Gave An Interview To The Media, Now He’s Being Detained By ICE

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A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Culture

A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Social media is where people can show off just about anything they create. This includes art in any and all media, like pancake art. Claudia, the creator behind Nappan Pancake art, is the latest artist watching their art reach the masses.

Claudia, the artist behind Nappan Pancake art, got her start because of the pandemic.

The artist first started to play around with pancake art last spring break when the pandemic forced businesses and schools to close. Claudia wanted to get more creative with her kids’ breakfasts since they were now always at home.

“I started experimenting with making Pancake art,” Claudia recalls to mitú. “At first I only used the color of the natural dough and a little cocoa. At first, I just used the ketchup dispensers and little by little I learned.”

Claudia uses her pancake art to honor some truly iconic people.

@nappancakes

Responder a @detodoun_poco233 Cepillín ✨🥞✨ en nuestros ♥️ #parati #fy #HijosAdopTiktoks #adoptiktoks #viral #foryou @cepillintv #pancakeart ncakeart

♬ La Feria de Cepillin – Cepillín

Cepillín recently died and the loss was felt throughout the community. He made our lives joyous and fun with his music, especially his birthday song. Some of the creations are done for fans who request to see their faves turned into delicious pancake art.

The artist loves creating the edible works of art.

The journey of becoming a pancake artist has been a fun adventure for Claudia and her children. The more she has practiced, the more she has been able to do.

“Sometimes I scream with excitement and I go to all the members of my house to see it,” Claudia says about her successes. “Other times it’s just a feeling like “disappointment could be better” other times it just breaks or burns and then I just cry but it usually feels very satisfying.”

You can check out all of her creations on TikTok.

@nappancakes

Responder a @reyna100804santoyo siii🥞✨ díganle que me adopte 🥺 @ederbez #adoptiktoks #hijosadoptiktoks #parati #foryou #viral #fy #art #pancakeart

♬ Little Bitty Pretty One – Thurston Harris

With 350,000 followers and growing, it won’t be long until more people start to fully enjoy Claudia’s art. Her children can’t get enough of it and she is so excited to share it with the rest of the world.

READ: Spicy Food Lovers Have Reason To Celebrate As New Study Says Eating Chilies Could Be Secret To Longevity

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Seniors In Mexico City Turned Their Wait For The Vaccine Into A Disco Dance Off

Things That Matter

Seniors In Mexico City Turned Their Wait For The Vaccine Into A Disco Dance Off

Last week, Mexican officials launched the country’s COVID-19 vaccination program by beginning to vaccinate those 65 and over. But, just like in countries around the world, the roll out hasn’t exactly been ideal. Many residents in the nation’s capital have reported waiting in line for hours for their vaccine, with some even being forced to camp out overnight to make sure they receive their shot.

Despite the long waits, many seniors are turning the headache into something fun by having impromptu dance offs and even yoga classes.

Seniors lined up to get vaccinated turned the wait into a fun dance off to pass the time.

As Mexico begins vaccinating the general public – after months of giving vaccines to public health workers – seniors, who are first in line, are facing immense lines at vaccination sites across the country.

To help pass the time, many of those waiting in line have tried to make the wait more bearable by dancing to tunes such as disco classic “I Will Survive.”

Healthcare workers outside a vaccination center in a Mexico City suburb got the festivities started by encouraging those waiting for a Sputnik V shot to cut a rug in the street as music played over a sound system. One of the workers even belted out a few songs over karaoke backing tracks to entertain the seniors, some of whom had begun lining up on Wednesday night.

Many seniors lined up didn’t mind the wait since they were grateful for the vaccine.

Despite the hours long wait – with some even camping out overnight to ensure their access to the vaccine – many of those waiting were simply grateful for the shots.

With tears in his eyes, 67-year-old Juan Mario Cárdenas told Reforma that he has lost friends to Covid-19 and that getting vaccinated was a matter of life and death for him. He is one of almost 200,000 people in the Mexico City boroughs of Iztacalco, Xochimilco and Tláhuac who are expected to receive a first shot of the Sputnik V vaccine by the end of next week.

The country is rolling out its vaccination program using the Russian Sputnik V vaccine.

Inoculation with the Russian vaccine began in the capital – the country’s coronavirus epicenter – on Wednesday, nearly two weeks after the first AstraZeneca shots were given to people aged 60 and over in several of the city’s most affected suburbs.

About 1.9 million vaccine doses had been administered in Mexico as of Wednesday night, mainly to health workers and seniors. The government expects to receive more than 100 million doses from several companies by the end of May.

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