Culture

Lomo Saltado Is The Most Iconic Peruvian Dish And Here Is A Recipe That Will Make Your Mouth Water

Peru has long been one of the greatest food cultures in the world. The South American country has been named a culinary destination in major publications. Lime itself has even been called the World’s Best Food City because of the most intricate pairings of Latin American and foreign influences. The blending of the different cultures that have moved through Peru has gifted the world some of the most iconic, recognizable, and incredibly flavorful dishes.

A very traditional take on Lomo Saltado uses potato as its starch. The adaptation of rice in the dish is something that came to Peru thanks to Asian immigration and influence. The recipe we are sharing with you today includes rice for the starch and gives you a taste and look at the clashing, yet melding cultures that call Peru home. Peru is one country that has embraced and promoted the kind of melting pot that not only allowed for diversity but the creation of unimaginably good food.

Pork is one of the most common meats used in Latin American cooking beat only by chicken. The use of pork is another example of colonialism, immigration, and the cross-cultural exchanges that have taken place in Latin American for centuries. The ancestor of the modern domestic pig is the Wild Boar that is native to all parts of the world except for Australia and the Americas. The pig was likely brought to Peru and the rest of Latin America by way of Spanish colonialism.

The dish, Lomo Saltado, is the perfect example of Peru’s role in immigration and its place as a gateway to Latin America for millions. The dish, as you can probably tell, uses Latin American ingredients but Chinese cooking techniques. The food is prepared as a stir fry turning the preparation of the food into a performance. Plus, when preparing it for your friends you can make sure you show off just how talented you are with handling your kitchen tools. Who doesn’t want to look cool in front of your friends?

Fortunately, most of these ingredients are easy to find at your local grocery stores. However, one of the ingredients that might prove challenging to locate with the ají amarillo. Thankfully, we live in 2019 so there is nothing stopping you from getting your hands on anything you desire thanks to the internet. Now, go out there and try to make this Lomo Saltado and let us know how it turns out for you.

We would love to see your photos and videos making any of the La Cocina recipes. Make sure you document your own kitchen adventures and upload them to social media and tag mitú to make sure we see them. Happy cooking and don’t forget, there’s nothing like homecooked food shared with friends to create some amazing memories. Who doesn’t enjoy a good meal with those they love?

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds of pork loin, sliced about 1 inch thick
  • 4 Roma tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 large red onion, sliced
  • 5 green onions or scallions, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons of ají amarillo, or however much you prefer
  • 2 tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup of a neutral flavor oil like canola, olive, or vegetable
  • 8 cloves of garlic, diced
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • 1 bunch of parsley, coarsely chopped
  • 2 pounds of French fries, homemade or pre-cooked
  • 2 cups of rice, you can choose whatever rice you prefer

Directions:

  1. Slowly cook the rice. Add the 2 cups of white rice to a pot and add 3 cups of water. Stir the rice and water and set the heat on low. Cover and let cook until all the water evaporates and is fully absorbed into the rice.
  2. Slice your pork loin and add it to a large bowl. Add a large pinch of salt and a large pinch of pepper. Drop in 4 diced garlic cloves to the meat and mix well. Make sure the meat is covered and let it marinate for about 15 minutes.
  3. In a wok or other high sided deep pan, add the oil and let it heat up so it is really hot. Add the pork loin and season with more salt, pepper, and the rest of the diced garlic. Stir the meat while it is cooking.
  4. When the meat is about done, add the sliced red onion to the pot and continue to stir. Now add the tomatoes and keep stirring while all of the ingredients cook together.
  5. Meanwhile, prepare your French fries.
  6. Add the ají amarillo, green onions, and soy sauce. Stir all of the ingredients until everything is well combined and then let cook until the liquids reduce by one-third.
  7. Once everything is cooked, serve the food. Add one serving of rice to a plate then add the pork loin to the plate and top with French fries and parsley. Enjoy.

READ: Let Us Teach You How To Make Plátanos Maduros That Your Mom Will Approve Of And Your Friends Will Love

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Culture

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Manuel Velasquez / Getty Images

Netflix has a new food show out and it has everyone buzzing. “Street Food: Latin America” is bringing everyone the sabor of Latin America to their living room. However, reviews are mixed because of Argentina and the lack of Central American representation.

Netflix has a new show and it is all about Latin American street food.

Some of the best food in the world comes from Latin America. That is just a fact and it isn’t because our families and community come for Latin America. Okay, maybe just a little. The food of Latin America comes with history and stories that have shaped our childhood. For many of us, it is the only thing we have that connects us to the lands our families have left.

The show is highlighting the contributions of women to street food.

“Street Food: Latin America” focuses mainly on the women that are leading the street food cultures in different countries in Latin America. For some of them, it was a chance to bring themselves out of poverty and care for their children. For others, it was a rebellion against the male-dominated culture of cooking in Latin America.

However, some people have some strong opinions about the show and they aren’t good.

There is a lot of attention to native communities in the Latino community culturally right now. The Argentina episode where someone claims that Argentina is more European is rubbing people the wrong way right now. While the native population of Argentina is small, it is still important to highlight and honor native communities who are indigenous to the lands.

The disregard for the indigenous community is upsetting because indigenous Argentinians are fighting for their lives and land.

An A Jazeera report focused on an indigenous community in northern Argentina who were fighting to protect their land. After decades of discrimination and humiliation, members of the Wichi community fought to protect their land from the Argentinian government grabbing it in 2017. Early this year, before Covid, children of the tribe started to die at alarming rates of malnutrition.

Another pain point in the Latino community is the complete disregard of Central America.

Central America includes Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Belize, and Panama. Central America’s exclusion is not sitting right with Netflix users with Central American heritage. Like, how can five whole countries be looked over during a Netflix show about street food in Latin America?

Seems like there is a chance for Netflix to revisit Latin America for more food content.

There are so many countries in Latin America that offer delicious foods to the world. There is more to Latin America than Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia.

READ: This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

Desperate For Work, Immigrant Workers Are Collecting The Bodies Of Covid-19 Victims

Things That Matter

Desperate For Work, Immigrant Workers Are Collecting The Bodies Of Covid-19 Victims

Hector Vivas / Getty Images

Countries across Latin America are struggling to combat the Coronavirus pandemic. In fact, Latin America is now considered the epicenter of the global outbreak, as countries in the region are ravaged by the virus. From Brazil to Mexico, government responses have varied widely and adherence to social distancing guidelines has been difficult for communities with little in the way of a financial safety net.

Meanwhile, Latin America is still experiencing a refugee crisis as Venezuelans flee their country for better opportunities in Colombia, Peru, Brazil, and even Mexico. This has led to many migrants being forced to take less than ideal jobs as ordinary work opportunity have dried up as the economies have been hit hard by the pandemic.

In Peru, migrants are collecting bodies of those who have died from Covid-19 in order to make a living.

Despite Peru’s early action to contain the pandemic, the coronavirus has spread like wildfire through the country. More than 390,000 people have been diagnosed with the virus so far. Meanwhile, the country is a destination for Venezuelan refugees, with at least 870,000 who have ended up in Peru, working low-wage jobs to make ends meet or to send funds home to impoverished loved ones.

One of the jobs these migrants are working is to collect the bodies of those who have died from Covid-19. It’s a grim job but they earn $500 a month for their efforts, nearly double the minimum wage in Peru. They work up to 19 hours a day, seven days a week.

Most of the bodies they collect are from poor neighborhoods, from homes where people can’t afford to hire a funeral director to handle the burial. There have been more than 13,000 deaths from Covid-19, and the public health system is collapsing under the weight of the grim toll. What’s left for the poor is a death with little dignity.

At the city’s El Angel Cemetery crematorium, many of the staff handling bodies also are Venezuelans.

“The Peruvians don’t do it. It’s tough,” said Orlando Arteaga, who works seven days a week, earning the money he needs to support three children in Venezuela and a 2-year-old daughter in Lima. He told CNN he never imagined he would see so much death, but that “somebody has to do it — and we need work.”

Peru has been hit hard by the outbreak and its death toll continues to rise.

As of July 28, Peru has seen more than 390,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and there have been 18,418 deaths related to the virus. These numbers have skyrocketed in recent weeks. In fact, at the beginning of the crisis, Peru appeared as a model for other countries in the region.

Peru was praised early on in the pandemic for its swift and decisive response, buffered by an enviable fiscal cushion. But four months later, the government’s disjointed execution of its strategy has made the country a cautionary tale for how not to fight Covid-19. Early on, Peru’s government imposed a strict lockdown that is only now being eased. A few days later, a fiscal package of more than 10% of GDP was announced, including cash transfers to the poorest third of the population, credit support for businesses and, most importantly, expanded funding to the health sector.

And yet, Peru’s record on dealing with the pandemic has not only been disappointing – it is among the worst in the world.

Venezuelan refugees have been pouring out of the country looking for better opportunities and ways to support their families.

Although Venezuela hasn’t been hit hard by the Coronavirus, compared to other countries – although this is beginning to change. However, it’s experiencing an economic catastrophe that has left millions in extreme poverty.

The country has recorded almost 16,000 cases of Covid-19 and less than 150 deaths. But the country is being ravaged by fuel and electricity shortages, a near worthless currency, and political strife that has rendered much of the government useless.

Countries in the region are being dramatically affected by the fallout. Neighboring Colombia, for instance, has absorbed some 1.6 million Venezuelan refugees to date in a migration wave that is severely straining government resources and adversely impacting the national economy. Peru has experienced much the same dynamic, as — to a lesser extent — have countries like Ecuador, Brazil and Chile. That’s because eight out of ten Venezuelan refugees have remained in Latin America and the Caribbean, so local governments have been forced to bear the brunt of Venezuela’s unfolding collapse.