Culture

Lomo Saltado Is The Most Iconic Peruvian Dish And Here Is A Recipe That Will Make Your Mouth Water

Peru has long been one of the greatest food cultures in the world. The South American country has been named a culinary destination in major publications. Lime itself has even been called the World’s Best Food City because of the most intricate pairings of Latin American and foreign influences. The blending of the different cultures that have moved through Peru has gifted the world some of the most iconic, recognizable, and incredibly flavorful dishes.

A very traditional take on Lomo Saltado uses potato as its starch. The adaptation of rice in the dish is something that came to Peru thanks to Asian immigration and influence. The recipe we are sharing with you today includes rice for the starch and gives you a taste and look at the clashing, yet melding cultures that call Peru home. Peru is one country that has embraced and promoted the kind of melting pot that not only allowed for diversity but the creation of unimaginably good food.

Pork is one of the most common meats used in Latin American cooking beat only by chicken. The use of pork is another example of colonialism, immigration, and the cross-cultural exchanges that have taken place in Latin American for centuries. The ancestor of the modern domestic pig is the Wild Boar that is native to all parts of the world except for Australia and the Americas. The pig was likely brought to Peru and the rest of Latin America by way of Spanish colonialism.

The dish, Lomo Saltado, is the perfect example of Peru’s role in immigration and its place as a gateway to Latin America for millions. The dish, as you can probably tell, uses Latin American ingredients but Chinese cooking techniques. The food is prepared as a stir fry turning the preparation of the food into a performance. Plus, when preparing it for your friends you can make sure you show off just how talented you are with handling your kitchen tools. Who doesn’t want to look cool in front of your friends?

Fortunately, most of these ingredients are easy to find at your local grocery stores. However, one of the ingredients that might prove challenging to locate with the ají amarillo. Thankfully, we live in 2019 so there is nothing stopping you from getting your hands on anything you desire thanks to the internet. Now, go out there and try to make this Lomo Saltado and let us know how it turns out for you.

We would love to see your photos and videos making any of the La Cocina recipes. Make sure you document your own kitchen adventures and upload them to social media and tag mitú to make sure we see them. Happy cooking and don’t forget, there’s nothing like homecooked food shared with friends to create some amazing memories. Who doesn’t enjoy a good meal with those they love?

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds of pork loin, sliced about 1 inch thick
  • 4 Roma tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 large red onion, sliced
  • 5 green onions or scallions, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons of ají amarillo, or however much you prefer
  • 2 tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup of a neutral flavor oil like canola, olive, or vegetable
  • 8 cloves of garlic, diced
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • 1 bunch of parsley, coarsely chopped
  • 2 pounds of French fries, homemade or pre-cooked
  • 2 cups of rice, you can choose whatever rice you prefer

Directions:

  1. Slowly cook the rice. Add the 2 cups of white rice to a pot and add 3 cups of water. Stir the rice and water and set the heat on low. Cover and let cook until all the water evaporates and is fully absorbed into the rice.
  2. Slice your pork loin and add it to a large bowl. Add a large pinch of salt and a large pinch of pepper. Drop in 4 diced garlic cloves to the meat and mix well. Make sure the meat is covered and let it marinate for about 15 minutes.
  3. In a wok or other high sided deep pan, add the oil and let it heat up so it is really hot. Add the pork loin and season with more salt, pepper, and the rest of the diced garlic. Stir the meat while it is cooking.
  4. When the meat is about done, add the sliced red onion to the pot and continue to stir. Now add the tomatoes and keep stirring while all of the ingredients cook together.
  5. Meanwhile, prepare your French fries.
  6. Add the ají amarillo, green onions, and soy sauce. Stir all of the ingredients until everything is well combined and then let cook until the liquids reduce by one-third.
  7. Once everything is cooked, serve the food. Add one serving of rice to a plate then add the pork loin to the plate and top with French fries and parsley. Enjoy.

READ: Let Us Teach You How To Make Plátanos Maduros That Your Mom Will Approve Of And Your Friends Will Love

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A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Culture

A Mexican Artist Is Making Pancake Art That’s Too Beautiful To Eat

Social media is where people can show off just about anything they create. This includes art in any and all media, like pancake art. Claudia, the creator behind Nappan Pancake art, is the latest artist watching their art reach the masses.

Claudia, the artist behind Nappan Pancake art, got her start because of the pandemic.

@nappancakes

casi ✨1 año✨haciendo #pancakeart 🥞 #parati #foryou #viral #trend #glowup #art #foryoupage

♬ Inox la bggg – ᗰᗩᖇIE ᗰOI ᑎᗩᖇᑌTO

The artist first started to play around with pancake art last spring break when the pandemic forced businesses and schools to close. Claudia wanted to get more creative with her kids’ breakfasts since they were now always at home.

“I started experimenting with making Pancake art,” Claudia recalls to mitú. “At first I only used the color of the natural dough and a little cocoa. At first, I just used the ketchup dispensers and little by little I learned.”

Claudia uses her pancake art to honor some truly iconic people.

@nappancakes

Responder a @detodoun_poco233 Cepillín ✨🥞✨ en nuestros ♥️ #parati #fy #HijosAdopTiktoks #adoptiktoks #viral #foryou @cepillintv #pancakeart ncakeart

♬ La Feria de Cepillin – Cepillín

Cepillín recently died and the loss was felt throughout the community. He made our lives joyous and fun with his music, especially his birthday song. Some of the creations are done for fans who request to see their faves turned into delicious pancake art.

The artist loves creating the edible works of art.

The journey of becoming a pancake artist has been a fun adventure for Claudia and her children. The more she has practiced, the more she has been able to do.

“Sometimes I scream with excitement and I go to all the members of my house to see it,” Claudia says about her successes. “Other times it’s just a feeling like “disappointment could be better” other times it just breaks or burns and then I just cry but it usually feels very satisfying.”

You can check out all of her creations on TikTok.

@nappancakes

Responder a @reyna100804santoyo siii🥞✨ díganle que me adopte 🥺 @ederbez #adoptiktoks #hijosadoptiktoks #parati #foryou #viral #fy #art #pancakeart

♬ Little Bitty Pretty One – Thurston Harris

With 350,000 followers and growing, it won’t be long until more people start to fully enjoy Claudia’s art. Her children can’t get enough of it and she is so excited to share it with the rest of the world.

READ: Spicy Food Lovers Have Reason To Celebrate As New Study Says Eating Chilies Could Be Secret To Longevity

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Peruvian Woman Wins Battle Over Right To Die Request

Fierce

Peruvian Woman Wins Battle Over Right To Die Request

No doubt about it, women have struggled more than anyone to convince the world that the right to make decisions about their bodies is theirs. Ana Estrada, a woman currently confined to her bed, knows this truth. After spending five years of attempting to convince Peruvian officials that she has what’s best for herself in mind, she has finally made a breakthrough.

Recently, Estrada was able to convince Peruvian officials to make a historic decision, regarding her own assisted death.

Euthanasia is largely illegal in the Roman Catholic country of Peru, but Estrada has been granted an exception.

Psychologist Ana Estrada, who has suffered from incurable and progressive polio since the age of 12, poses for pictures at her house in Lima, on February 15, 2020. – A Peruvian court on February 25, 2021 ordered the government to respect the wishes of Estrada to be allowed to die, a rare allowance for euthanasia in largely Catholic Latin America. (Photo by Angela PONCE / AFP) (Photo by ANGELA PONCE/AFP via Getty Images)

Euthanasia is a practice that is illegal in many countries across the globe including Peru where access to abortion and same-sex marriage are also banned. Still, Estrada made a decision for herself to commit to a five-year legal battle after she decided to end her own life “when the time comes.”

Recently, Peru’s government ruled not to appeal a court ruling which recognized her right to “a dignified death.”

“It is an individual case, but I hope it serves as a precedent,” Estrada, 44, explained to Reuters in a recent interview. “I think it is an achievement not only of mine, not only of my cause but also an achievement of law and justice in Peru.”

Estrada, who is a psychologist, has lived with the rare disease called polymyositis for three decades.

The painful disease progressively attacks her muscles and has resulted in her need to breathe with a respirator most of the time. According to NBC, a court ruling from last week granted that state health insurer EsSalud to provide “all conditions” needed for Estrada’s euthanasia. The court also ruled that the event must occur within 10 business days of the date that she decides to end her life. According to NBC, “EsSalud said a statement it would comply with the ruling and form medical commissions to develop a protocol for such cases. The court ruling also cleared anyone assisting Estrada in her death from facing charges, although local law still prohibits anyone from helping people to die.”

Estrada is the author of the blog “Ana seeks dignified death” which she began writing in 2016. In an interview with Reuters, she explained that she made the decision to end her life when she realized she was no longer able to write.

“My body is failing, but my mind and my spirit are happy,” she explained. “I want the last moment of my life to continue like this, in freedom, with peace, tranquility, and autonomy. I want to be remembered like that.”

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