Culture

Quebradita And Cry Your Latino Heart Out At This Dance Party

Close your eyes. Imagine an empty dance floor illuminated by colorful lights. You have a beer in your hand, and there’s a cutie across the room making eyes at you. Then the DJ drops “La Chona” by Los Tucanes de Tijuana. What do you do?

If you’re at Noche Romántica, you finish off that beer, walk over to the cutie, ask them to dance and then get your ass to the dance floor.

Adrian Huerta/Noche Romantica/Instagram

Noche Romántica is a dance party dedicated to bringing the quince to the club, spinning all the música Latina that are the staples of family parties. That means cumbias, boleros, corridos, románticas, banda, norteño and more.

Noche Romantica in Boyle Heights TBt ?photo by @maiden213

A post shared by ✨Noche Romantica✨ (@cometonocheromantica) on

Leslie Mendez/Noche Romántica/Instagram

Noche Romántica nights are packed with young people reliving their upbringing one song at a time. That includes José Luis Arreguin, who started the night in San Francisco with Jose Trujillo back in 2012. Since then, Noche Romántica has become the night to bust a quebradita in LA and New York as well, adding Joshua Lasso, Dave Salvaje, Maryann Aguirre and a slew of guest DJ’s.

“[Trujillo] and I started talking about how there are no nights that play Latin music and the music we grew up listening to,” says Arreguin. “There was salsa nights, but it just wasn’t the same. We wanted to play románticas and corridos, and there was no one doing that. We all grew up around the music. We want it to be like you’re going to a quinceañera.”

Seeing the Latino population shrink due to gentrification in San Francisco’s Mission District gave Arreguin and Trujillo further reason to create the night.

“The culture was changing in the Mission, so we wanted to keep some of it alive by playing the music,” he recalls.

Arreguin also looks back to his childhood at family parties held in remote ranchos: Running around amongst horses, playing hide and seek and catching a buzz after drinking near-empty cans of beer.

“My parents would be dancing, kicking up dirt. And they’d be nice because they were a little tipsy and having fun,” says Arreguin. “The music stands out in my mind. There was really good music. I just remember those moments. They were so beautiful to me. I want to recreate that feeling through the music we play.”

The DJ’s seemed to have successfully tapped into that nostalgia for those that come to dance, or cry, at Noche Romántica.

CREDIT: Noche Romantica

“Dancing is obviously a good sign. They’re having a good time,” says Arreguin. “But I trip when people are standing there holding a beer and I play a song, and then they look down at the floor and their eyes start filling with tears. I’m hitting a nerve; a memory. I love getting those reactions. Or they’ll come up to me and share a story when I play a song. I’ve heard so many stories at our nights. I love that. I love that these songs bring back memories for people.”

As far as which song always gets the dance floor poppin’, Arreguin says you can’t go wrong with “La Puerta Negra” by Los Tigres Del Norte.

“Just the way it sounds. It’s so distinct,” he says. “Right away you know what it is and it gets people going.”


Here are 15 more Noche Romántica bangers, curated with mucho amor by the collective of DJ’s, to get you in the mood until the next party, which you can find by following Noche Romántica on Instagram.


READ: From Corridos To Punk, Chulita Vinyl Club Spins The Music We’re Dying To Hear

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Bad Bunny Goes Norteño: The Latin Trap Icon Joined Corrido Star Natanael Cano To Create The Wildest Mashup

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Goes Norteño: The Latin Trap Icon Joined Corrido Star Natanael Cano To Create The Wildest Mashup

Nataneal_cano / Instagram

Corrido is going from old-school abuelo music to a more urbano and trap-infused genre lately. The classic regional Mexican sound, known for its narrative folk ballads, is slowly but surely joining in on the ‘música urbana’ movement that has the whole world listening. And with Bad Bunny injecting his hip-hop and trap flair into the genre, we can confirm that corridos tumbados, are officially the new thing. 

After visiting Mexico for a run of tour dates in support of his latest album X 100Pre, Bad Bunny surprised us all with a unique project: a corrido. 

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

In his latest release, the trap-reggaeton star tapped the urban regional Mexican label, Rancho Humilde, for a collaboration that would bridge the gap between regional Mexican music and Puerto Rican música urbana —and surprise us all with the result. El Conejo Malo got in touch  with the urban corrido, or corrido tumbado artist, Natanael Cano.

Natanael Cano is part of a new school of Corrido, the ‘Corrido Tumbado’ which adds trap and urban influences to the classic genre.

Credit: natanael_cano / Instagram

Cano is part of a burgeoning movement of Mexican artists making trap corridos (or “corridos tumbados”) that incorporate hip-hop elements into the traditional corrido style. At just 18, Cano has turned into an internet sensation. His viral hits “El F1” and “El Drip” have more than 17 million views on Youtube. And his song “El de la Codeína” made it to #1 on Apple Music’s Latino chart.

With the remix to ‘Soy El Diablo’ Bad Bunny wants to promote unity among all Latinx communities.

Credit: natanael_cano / Instagram

Bad Bunny and Natanel Cano emerged with a remix of Cano’s gritty 2019 track, “Soy El Diablo” (“I Am the Devil”). Taking cues from the Sonora native, Bunny sings Cano’s lines in his unmistakably Caribbean accent, over strums of acoustic guitar.

“Para mi gente linda de Mexico, Puerto Rico, Latinoamerica/Eso es pa’ toda mi raza/ America es nuestra casa,” says one of Bad Bunny’s lines —using the song as a platform to promote unity among all Latinx communities. “This is for my beautiful people in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Latin America/This is for my race/America is our home!”

Bad Bunny had been teasing the collab for a few weeks.

The unlikely pair dropped the first official urbano/corrido collab in October, weeks after teasing at it with Benito posting videos of himself on Instagram singing along to the song and drinking tequila from the bottle. “It’s something I never imagined. Like, zero percent,” Cano said in an interview about the remix. But the Mexican artist is acutely aware of the important place that Latin urbano sounds hold in the global musical landscape of the moment. “We’re the new generation [of regional], and we have that other sound naturally inside of us. It’s organic.”

In the song Bad Bunny even uses regional Mexican slang and references.

The corrido opens with Bad Bunny’s “Ajuaaaa.” His delivery, and even his slang —which include shout outs to Canelo Álvarez and Rancho Humilde and words like “compa,” and “banda” are typical of the regional genre to refer to the people— show the importance that Benito gave this remix.

The collab was first suggested to both parties by Marissa Gastelum, who runs Latin artist relations at Apple Music.

Credit: ranchohumilde/ Instagram

“In September, Noah [Assad, Bad Bunny’s manager] called me and asked me what I thought of this kid,” recalls Gastelum in an interview with Billboard. “He told me Bad Bunny really loves this song ‘Soy El Diablo.’ And I said, wait, lets do something!”

Gastelum called Jimmy Humilde, the owner of indie Rancho Humilde  Records, to which Cano is signed. Humilde, who has worked to create an “urban regional” sound that appeals to a younger generation of regional Mexican fans, thought it was a great idea, and so the regional/urban remix was born.

Bad Bunny chased his tequila-fueled release with a string of New England tour dates — and a stint as guest lecturer at Harvard University. If we can count on Benito to do one thing, it’s to inject his cool-effect on anything he touches. 

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This Brother And Sister Duo Have Gone Viral With Their Powerful Corrido About Current Deportations

Entertainment

This Brother And Sister Duo Have Gone Viral With Their Powerful Corrido About Current Deportations

Yaxeni Y Ricardo Los Luzeros De Rioverde / Facebook

If you look up the definition of a corrido, Google will tell you that it is a “ballad in a traditional Mexican style, typically having lyrics that narrate a historical event.” Key word here is “historical,” so if you hear those corridos that our parents played back in the day, you’d know what was going down in the Latino community during that time. Today, Latinos are going through a myriad complexities, and there’s a new generation of writers and performers that are singing about this crucial and terrifying time.

Meet brother and sister act Yaxeni y Ricardo who call themselves Los Luzeros De Rioverde. The siblings are a corrido band that is singing about the harsh times facing the community under the current administration.

These cute kids are Houston natives and while they look very young they are wise beyond their years.

In their short time as artists, they’ve already released three albums. Their latest is called “Con amor y sentimiento.”

All of their albums feature songs in both English and Spanish.

They’s performed for audiences at various venues, including in national tv for people like Steve Harvey.

Yup, they were featured on “Little Big Shots.”

However, they’re latest corrido is causing big waves on the internet because it’s about deportation.

"SI ME DEPORTAN " Algo de lo que viene en nuestro tercer disco titulado Con Amor y Sentimiento Esperenlo Agosto 10 saldra ala Venta en todas laa tiendas Dijitales! (Primicia para Noticias Telemundo ) #simedeportan #conamorysentimiento #uaua #losluzerosderioverde #openupyourheartamerica #openupyourheart #letssingalltogether #telemundo

Posted by Yaxeni Y Ricardo Los Luzeros De Rioverde on Sunday, August 5, 2018

The song is called “Si me deportan” (“If I get deported”).

The brother and sister sing about the strict laws of the United States, and they sing through the point of view of their parents.

“What if they deport us with our kids/even though they were born in the United States,” the song begins.

“We are millions who live here illegally/but we came here to improve our lives/and even though they call us criminals, that will never get us down.”

The duo has been showered with praise and love for the song highlighting the terrifying situation so many people are experiencing right now.

In 2016, Yaxeni y Ricardo talked about being against deportation and the separation of families.

They released a song about deportation back then called “El Descendiente” (The Offspring).

“We want to be the voice of all those kids who don’t have a voice,” Yaxeni said.

CREDIT: YouTube/
Yaxeni Y Ricardo Los Luzeros De Rioverde

To learn more about Los Luzeros De Rioverde check out their YouTube page and their Facebook page.

READ: These Young Mexican-Americans Just Wrote A Corrido For Bernie Sanders

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