Culture

These 13 Latina-Inspired Gifts Will Make Your Mom Feel So Seen This Holiday Season

Finding the perfect gift for mom is always a challenge, isn’t it? You may already have ideas for gifts to give your siblings, or friends, or even your abuelos, but moms are tough to shop for. That’s why we’re thinking, why not gift her something fun and clever? It’s the experiences that we remember the most, so maybe a bland gift won’t be as memorable as that hilarious mug you got her that Christmas of 2019. So have a read below to find some comical and clever presents for your mamita. Because Latinos don’t give basic gifts, we won’t let you down. 

‘Mami’ necklace

Nothing sweeter, prettier or more classic, than gifting mom a piece of jewelry —or wait— we can think of something sweeter; a piece of jewelry with the word mami on it. “Mom” just doesn’t quite describe the head of a Latino family, the only term that can do her justice is mami or mamita or ‘her majesty… just saying. 

‘La Jefa’ apron

Sorry, this apron is for boss Latinas only*. If you are not one, please hit the back button on your browser immediately. Mom is the ultimate jefa. She runs the house, she runs the family, she raised you, for God’s sake —is there anything the woman can’t do? Get her the apron, she deserves it. 

‘Andale Por Pendeja’ t-shirt

If your mom is anything like mine, or any other mom on the planet, saying “I told you so” doesn’t quite cut it, and sometimes she might want to get her point across with just a smidge of judgment. Thankfully, mitú made this Ándale Por Pendeja Tee for such occasions! 

Mom’s Favorite Candle Set

You know who would love this Latino-inspired Candle Collection? Your mom. No, really. She’d love this refreshingly minty Sana Sana candle, or perhaps the soapy fragrance of this Te Boté one? And who could ever resist the iconic (yet triggering) Saturday morning scent of Fabulosa? No one, that’s who!

‘Poderosa’ hoop earrings

Nothing but the best for your queen. These hoops are 14 karat gold plated brass, and you know she deserves them. Because we’ve never met a more poderosa woman than a madre de familia. 

‘Comadres’ tee

Your mom was your very first comadre before you even made friends. Remind her about your special bond with this ‘Comadres’ tee, she’ll be moved to tears, guaranteed.

‘World’s best suegra’

Surprise your suegra with this mug, she hugs like a mother and loves like a friend so she deserves the best!! Ideal for the perfect mom-in-law. 

‘Te Calmas o Te Calmo’ chanclas

Who knew the most triggering of phrases would make a badass pair of chanclas? This Te Calmas O Te Calmo chanclas are not only fashionable, but subtly threatening to anyone who grew up in a Latino household, and it makes the perfect phrase for that mom who’s always keeping you in check. Help make her life easier by gifting her some chanclas with her signature phrase printed on it. You’re welcome. 

‘La Jefa’ iPhone case

Mom has some important phone calls to make, so let her make them in style. Help her flaunt her endless poder every time she takes out her phone. 

Concha Fleece Blanket

Carbs are the devil, yes, but mom’s precious conchas and cafecito definitely don’t count! Help mami stay warm in the winter with this Concha Fleece Blanket and enjoy whatever sweet dreams may come. And maybe make her a damn coffee once in a while. 

‘House Favorite’ dog bandana

Let’s be real here. The true golden child of your house is the dog. You know it, your siblings know it, and your mom knows it, too. Getting your mom’s beloved doggo a present equals to getting a present for the woman herself! So we made this House Favorite Dog Bandana for all of mom’s good boys and good girls out there.

‘Hermosa’ hoops

There will never be a more hermosa woman in your life. Mom deserves these hoops because she’s a hardworking queen and a role model, and she’s nothing but ‘hermosa’ every day, even on Sundays, when she’s doing la limpieza in her flashiest outfits.

‘Pa qué highlighter’ Makeup bag

This little cosmetics bag would be a lifesaver for the makeup obsessed mom. Remind that makeup queen that she doesn’t need any highlighter with that brown shine of hers. This vegan leather bag is perfect for holding all of mami’s day-to-day essentials. Take this with you and shine.

READ: These Latino Holiday Gifts Are Anything But Basic

Camila Cabello’s Performance At The Grammys Made Everyone Cry As They Remembered Kobe Bryant And His Daughter

Entertainment

Camila Cabello’s Performance At The Grammys Made Everyone Cry As They Remembered Kobe Bryant And His Daughter

camila_cabello / Instagram

The 62nd annual Grammy Awards was filled with tributes to Kobe Bryant after his tragic and shocking death in a helicopter crash with his daughter in Calabasas. Artists included tributes to the basketball legend in their performances last night but one performance made everyone think about the father and daughter who died.

Camila Cabello sang her new single “First Man” about the love between and father and daughter and things became very emotional.

Cabello’s song “Frist Man” is a song dedicated to the love between a daughter and father. A special love that cannot be explained to those who have not experienced it. It is a bond filled with trust, safety, protection, and appreciation.

Cabello sang the song to her father, who was sitting in the front row, and he could not contain his emotions.

Latino fathers aren’t known for their public display of emotions. It isn’t because they don’t feel the emotions but it is just a common thing for Latino dads to stay stoic and strong. Seeing Cabello’s father crying while his daughter sings to him is a touching moment.

Her performance was bringing social media users to tears.

Credit: @ashley_dawn31 / Twitter

You can see the emotions in Cabello’s eyes as she sang her sweet song dedicated to the love and sacrifices of her dad. It is a special reminder that our parents have done so much to get us to where we are.

The song had a special meaning since it was the same day that Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna Maria-Onore Bryant died in a helicopter crash.

Credit: @thekatiestevens / Twitter

On the morning of Jan. 26, 2020, before the Grammys, news broke that Kobe Bryant died when a helicopter crashed in Calabasas. The entertainment world was shocked when TMZ reported the crash. Bryant, who was 41, played for the L.A. Lakers for 20 years. His daughter was following in his footsteps and was part of the basketball community. In their rush to report the story, TMZ reported Bryant’s death before the family could be notified.

A mixture of the days’ events and the connection between fathers and daughters led to an emotional reaction from fans.

Credit: @GinnyBbadd / Twitter

There was a lot of build-up to the performance. Many speculated, based on the kind of hype the performance was getting, that Cabello might be singing a special song to Shawn Mendes. Mendes and Cabello fans are not-so-secretly hoping for the pair to become a couple.

Even parents felt the love in the song.

Credit: @DanLeach971 / Twitter

Who couldn’t text their parents or children after seeing this performance? The love between a child and their parent is something special. It is an unconditional love that comes with heartbreak when the child moves away. It is a bittersweet relationship filled with so many ups and downs but it is beautiful in its longevity.

The performance really hit home for some viewers who recently lost their own parents.

Credit: deblturner / Twitter

The loss of a parent is a hard moment in anyone’s life. They are the person who knows you best and has known you your entire life. Losing that kind of connection is tough and painful but a part of life.

So, take some time and call your parents today. They want to hear from you.

*cries in Spanish*

READ: Camila Cabello Has Apologized For Using The N-Word And Fans Are Pretty Messed Up About It

Does Anybody Really Know What’s Supposed To Happen After You Get The Baby Jesus Figurine In La Rosca De Reyes?

Culture

Does Anybody Really Know What’s Supposed To Happen After You Get The Baby Jesus Figurine In La Rosca De Reyes?

alejandro.munoz.p / Instagram

Remember Día de Reyes when everyone cuts the rosca and hopes to god not to get the little niño Jesus? If you grew up Mexican, you probably know that whoever gets the baby Jesus figurine owes everyone tamales. But when is the tamal party? And most importantly—why? Keep reading to find out what El Día de la Candelaria means, what your abuelitas and tías are actually celebrating and how it originated —spoiler alert: it’s colonization.

February 2nd may be Groundhog Day in the United States, but in Mexico, and for many Latinos outside of Mexico, there is a completely different celebration on this date.

The religious holiday is known as Día de la Candelaria (or Candlemas in English). And on this day of the year, people get together with family and friends to eat tamales, as a continuation of the festivities of Three Kings’ Day on January 6. 

This is why your abuelita dresses up her niño Jesús in extravagant outfits.

For Día de la Candelaria it’s customary for celebrants to dress up figures of the Christ Child in special outfits and take them to the church to be blessed. Día de la Candelaria is traditionally a religious and family celebration, but in some places, such as Tlacotalpan, in the state of Veracruz, it is a major fiesta with fairs and parades.

February 2nd is exactly forty days after Christmas and is celebrated by the Catholic church as the Feast of the Purification of the Virgin.

Alternatively, this day also counts as the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple. The origin of this religious feast day comes from ancient Jewish tradition. According to Jewish law, a woman was considered unclean for 40 days after giving birth, and it was customary to bring a baby to the temple after that period of time had passed. So the idea is that Mary and Joseph would have taken Jesus to the temple to be blessed on February second, forty days after his birth on December 25.

The tradition goes back to around the 11th Century in Europe.

People typically took candles to the church to be blessed as part of the celebration. This tradition was based on the biblical passage of Luke 2:22-39 which recounts how when Mary and Joseph took Jesus to the temple, a particularly devout man named Simeon embraced the child and prayed the Canticle of Simeon: “Now thou dost dismiss thy servant, O Lord, according to thy word in peace; Because my eyes have seen thy salvation, Which thou hast prepared before the face of all peoples: A light to the revelation of the Gentiles, and the glory of thy people Israel.” The reference to the light inspired the celebration of the blessing of the candles.

In Mexico Día de la Candelaria is a follow-up to the festivities of Three Kings Day on January 6th.

On Día De Reyes, when children receive gifts, families and friends gather together to eat Rosca de Reyes, a special sweet bread with figurines of a baby (representing the Child Jesus) hidden inside. The person (or people) who received the figurines on Three Kings Day are supposed to host the party on Candlemas Day. Tamales are the food of choice.

This tradition also carries Pre-Hispanic roots.

After the Spanish conquistadors introduced the Catholic religion and masked indigenous traditions with their own, to help spread evangelization, many villagers picked up the tradition of taking their corn to the church in order to get their crops blessed after planting their seeds for the new agricultural cycle that was starting. They did this on February 2, which was the eleventh day of the first month on the Aztec calendar —which coincidentally fell on the same day as the Candelaria celebration. It’s believed that this is why, to this day, the celebratory feast on February 2 is all corn-based —atole and tamales.

This date is special for other reasons too… 

February 2, marks the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, which aligns with the pagan holiday of Imbolc. Since ancient times, this date was thought to be a marker or predictor of the weather to come, which is why it is also celebrated as Groundhog Day in the United States. There was an old English saying that went “if Candlemas be fair and bright, Winter has another flight. If Candlemas brings clouds and rain, Winter will not come again.” In many places, this is traditionally seen as the best time to prepare the earth for spring planting.

In Perú the Fiesta de la Candelaria is a festival in honor of the Virgin of Candelaria, patron saint of the city of Puno and it is one of the biggest festivals of culture, music, and dancing in the country.

The huge festival brings together the Catholic faith and Andean religion in homage to the Virgin of Candelaria. The Virgin represents fertility and purity. She is the patron saint of the city and is strongly associated with the Andean deity of ‘Pachamama’ (‘mother earth’). It is this common factor of both religions that brings them together for the festival. In 2014, UNESCO declared the festival an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The main dates of ‘Fiesta de la Candelaria’ are February 2nd – 12th.