Culture

Mexico’s Cañón Del Sumidero Should Be On Any Adventure-Loving Traveler’s Itinerary And Here’s Why

Sumidero Canyon, situated just outside of San Cristobal de las Casas in Chiapas, Mexico, is a  breathtaking site to be seen if you ever find yourself in the southern region of the country. This inexplicable testament to the power of water will blow your mind with it’s flowing river and kilometer-high rock walls. 

A visit to Tuxtla Gutiérrez, the capital of the state of Chiapas, would never be complete  without a boat trip through el Cañon del Sumidero.

If you ever find yourself exploring the wonderful state of Chiapas in southern Mexico, no visit would be complete without a stop by Tuxtla Gutierrez’s nearby Cañon del Sumidero. The canyon’s vertical walls tower up to 1,000 meters above the rather narrow Grijalva river. And it’s a site to be seen!

Never heard of Chiapas?

Tuxtla Gutiérrez is the capital of the Mexican state of Chiapas. If you’re not quite sure where Chiapas is, it’s no wonder.  It is the southernmost state in Mexico. It borders the states of Oaxaca to the west, Veracruz to the northwest and Tabasco to the north, and by Guatemala to the east and southeast. Chiapas also has a coastline along the Pacific Ocean to the south.

Visiting Tuxtla Gutierrez

Tuxtla (as it is commonly called) has had one of the fastest growing rates in Mexico in the last 40 years. Unlike many other areas in Chiapas, it isn’t a big tourist attraction, but a transportation hub for tourists coming into the state, with a major airport and a bus terminal. Tuxtla is definitely a comfortable, worthwhile and welcoming place to spend a day or two, and it’s near the famous canyon.

This canyon was one of the favorite haunts of the founder of the Tuxtla zoo.

Dubbed, “The Best Zoo in Latin America,” back in 1979, Tuxtla Gutierrez‘s zoo was far ahead of its time in respect to treating animals decently. Biologist Miguel Álvarez del Toro, Mexico’s most famous conservationist, loved this place, and it’s not hard to see why. 

The canyon’s near vertical, kilometer–high rock walls and numerous wild animals are worth the trip.

Near-vertical walls rise more than 2,500 feet (800 meters) overhead. A wide river slowly snakes along the valley below. Monkeys, crocodiles, and birds of all sorts can be spotted in the numerous jungle patches along the shoreline. If you enjoy witnessing amazing natural wonders, you’ll love taking a Sumidero Canyon boat trip.

But first, a stop in Chiapa de Corzo.

Trips down the river are organized from several docks alongside the little town of Chiapa de Corzo which,  for a brief time had been the state capital. The word chiapa, by the way, appears to be a short form of the word tepechiapan, which means “water below the hill,” a fitting description of the Grijalva river flowing through kilometer-high walls of rock.

There is much more to this canyon than high walls.

The farther you go downriver, the more obvious it becomes that there is something wonderful and magical about this place. One moment you are overwhelmed by majesty and grandeur and the next you’re seduced by a spray of wildflowers and then your heart is touched by the cute and silly antics of child-like spider monkeys who are obviously fast friends with the boatmen who ferry tourists up and down the river. You‘ll be mesmerized by rocky crags high, high above you, but when you glance back down at the river you see an elegant white egret posing on a slender wand protruding from the water or suddenly discover a big brown pelican floating right next to you. Another glance and you spot a huge, lazy crocodile sprawled over a rocky outcrop, taking the sun.

The canyon is the second most popular attraction in the state, only to the Mayan ruins of Palenque.

Around 300,000 people take the boat ride down the Grijalvo river every year, making the Cañon del Sumidero the second most popular site in Chiapas, after Palenque.

The easiest, cheapest, and quickest way to do the Sumidero Canyon boat tour from San Cristobal de las Casas is to go with a tour group

For around $300 pesos (about $15 USD), you’ll get round-trip transportation, a boat tour, and an hour or so to explore the lovely town of Chiapa de Corzo – where the Sumidero Canyon boat trips launch from. Tack on another $150-200 pesos and they’ll also take you to the viewpoints (miradores) on the canyon’s edge, sometimes at the expense of spending time in the town. These tours can be purchased at any of the many tour agencies along the Andador Guadalupe in San Cristobal.

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This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

Things That Matter

This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

via Getty Images

In the town of Ayahualtempa, Mexico, in the state of Guerrero, reporters see a shocking image whenever they visit. Children armed with guns, trained to defend themselves. The disturbing scene is meant to be shocking. The village of Ayahualtempa is under constant attack. A prominent heroin “corridor”, they are the victims of violence and carnage at the hands of gangsters and the cartel.

In order to gain the Mexican government’s attention, the Ayahualtempa villagers dress their children up as soldiers. Then, they invite the media in.

Ayahualtempa
via Getty Images

When reporters arrive, the children of Ayahualtempa dutifully line up and put on a performance. They march, they show how they would shoot a gun from one knee, or from flat on their bellies. They tell reporters that their mock-violent performance is “so the president sees us and helps us,” as a 12-year-old child named Valentín told the Associated Press.

Because the Mexican government doesn’t protect Ayahualtempa, the display of child soldiers is a form of protest for the small indigenous village. The people of this remote region of Guerrero want protection from the National Guard, and financial help for widows and orphans who have been made so from organized crime.

The villagers don’t trust local authorities, and for good reason. Guerrera is the Mexican state in which 43 teaching students were abducted and killed in an event that is known as the “Iguala mass kidnapping”. Authorities arrested 80 suspects in connection to the event. 44 of them were police officers, working in conjunction with a network of cartels.

Although the demonstrations function largely as a publicity stunt, violence is very much a part of these children’s lives.

via Getty Images

Parents train their children to walk to school with loaded guns, ready to defend themselves against violent gangsters.

The attention-grabbing antics have, to some extent, worked. On one occasion, the government donated some housing material. On another, benefactors gave the community’s orphans and widows scholarships and houses. But as soon as the periodic media storms die down, the federal government continues pretending Ayahualtempa doesn’t exist.

The hypocrisy of the government’s response is frustrating to many. “We’ve normalized that these children don’t eat, are illiterate, are farm workers. We’re used to the Indians dying young, but, ‘How dare they arm them!’” said local human rights activist Abel Barrera to the AP, with a heavy dose of sarcasm.

As for now, until the government moves to protect the community, they say they will continue their demonstrations. “They see that the issue of the children is effective for making people take notice and they think: If that’s what works, we’ll have to keep doing it,” said Barrera.

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Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Entertainment

Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Pokémon fans in Latin America are mourning the death of Diana Pérez, the Spanish-language voice of Jessie of Pokémon’s Team Rocket. The voice actress has been voicing the character since 1997.

Diana Pérez, the voice actress of Team Rocket’s Jessie, died at 51.

Lalo Garza, a famed voice actor in Mexico, confirmed the death of the Pokémon voice actress.

“Rest in peace Diana Pérez, a strong, cultured, intelligent, and very talented woman. You are good now, friend. Nothing hurts anymore. Have a good trip,” reads the tweet.

Pérez has been a staple in the Spanish-language Pokémon fandom for decades.

Pérez was more than just he voice of Jessie. The voice actress was the voice of multiple anime characters including Luffy in One Piece and Kagura in Inuyasha. In recent years, Pérez had started branching out to directing, producing, and other branches in the entertainment industry.

Pérez’s death is being mourned by Pokémon fans outside of the Spanish-language fandom.

Sarah Natochenny is the English voice of Ash Ketchum in the Pokémon series, Jessie’s mortal enemy. The death of Pérez has impacted the larger Pokémon community. Pérez was a pivotal part of the Latin American Pokémon community for decades and her loss has devastated fans.

Descansa en paz, Diana.

There have been no plans announced for a replacement to voice Team Rocket’s Jessie. No official cause of death has been released either. Our hearts and thoughts go out to Pérez’s family and the greater Pokémon community mourning her passing.

READ: I Was Today Years Old When I Found Out This Mexican Pokémon

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