Culture

Mexico Is Home To Two Of The World’s Coolest Neighborhoods And We Can Confirm They’re Incredible

In 2018, TIME magazine and the New York Times both shined the spotlight on Mexico City – saying it was their top destination of the year. And in 2019, Lonely Planet and Time Out both named Oaxaca as one of their top cities in the world. Now, both of those cities are home to some of Time Out’s ‘coolest’ neighborhoods in the world.

The list was put together by local Time Out editors, city experts and more than 27,000 people surveyed around the world. Other spots making the prestigious ranking include Barranco in Lima, Bom Retiró in São Paulo and Historic Filipinotown in Los Angeles. Here’s the lowdown on Mexico’s Top Two…. 

Mexico City: Juárez

There are few places as dynamic, diverse, or downright enormous as the Mexican capital. In a city layered with history, in which change is an essential part of residents’ DNA, where to begin planning a trip? We’d suggest Colonia Juárez.

Yes, it just made Time Out’s annual Top 50 list but it’s been the hub of Mexico City’s cool for at least a year or two already.

Juarez combines beautiful and eclectic architecture with new and exciting bars, restaurants, art galleries, and shops. This neighborhood is also home to Zona Rosa, the heart of the LGBTQ+ party scene and the city’s Koreatown. 

The bustling neighborhood has seen several new bars, restaurants and clubs open in recent months – many already climbing their way up the ranks of the city’s best.

Credit: _niddo / Instagram

In recent months, one of the most exciting openings in Juarez was Niddo, a restaurant that offered incredible comfort food and desserts; their falafel grilled cheese sandwich is next level. The colonia is also home to Hanky Panky, one of the city’ best cocktail hotspots.

Milan 44 and Comedor Lucerna are two immense food halls that play live music and have the perfect mashup of food, cocktails, and fun.

If partying is more your scene, Juárez is also home to Zona Rosa – the hub of the city’s immense LGBTQ+ community.

The hub of the city’s LGBTQ+ neighborhood is centered on the bustling cobblestones Calle Amberes. Here you’ll find no less than two dozen bars and clubs plus shops, social services, and hotels all catering to the LGBTQ+ community.

Colonia Juarez is also super international.

Credit: local.mx / Instagram

It’s the hub of many foreign companies, borders the bustling Paseo Reforma (the city’s main thoroughfare) and houses the city’s Koreatown. Here you’ll find all the best bites of Korean food but in Mexico City.

And if you’re into museums and historical architecture, Juárez is where you’ll need to be.

From shops located in colonial mansions to museums in modern glass and steel structures, the architecture here is truly varied. But you’ll find a greater concentration of colonial mansions and villas here as many of the city’s wealthiest residents in the 19th Century moved here as the Historic Center became more crowded.

Oaxaca: Jalatlaco

Jalatlaco, in Oaxaca, was listed as the 17th coolest neighborhood in the world! This neighborhood is close to the historic city center of Oaxaca (one to its incredible history) and it’s lined with colorful houses and cobblestone streets. In recent years, art galleries, excellent boutiques, and incredible Oaxacan restaurants have opened here.

The neighborhood is quickly becoming the city’s hottest dining hub.

Credit: casa__armadillo_negro / Instagram

Restaurants such as El Armadillo Negro and the bar Los Pilares Hotel are some of the best places to visit in the area. But it’s also the hub of the city’s immense and growing dining scene with no less than 200 eateries in such a small district. From vegetarian and vegan options to some of the city’s best pizza options – it’s a true foodie scene.

And home to its art community.

Credit: cordoba_lab / Instagram

Cities all across Mexico are experiencing an artistic renaissance but few cities have an art scene like Oaxaca. It’s experimental, open, and easily accessible to visitors. In Jalatlaco, galleries pop up on nearly every street and there are open air markets to explore the work of local artists. Meanwhile, major galleries, such as the Córdoba Galleria + Lab are attracting big name international attention.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

Things That Matter

This Indigenous Village In Mexico Trains Their Children As Soldiers To Combat Gang Violence

via Getty Images

In the town of Ayahualtempa, Mexico, in the state of Guerrero, reporters see a shocking image whenever they visit. Children armed with guns, trained to defend themselves. The disturbing scene is meant to be shocking. The village of Ayahualtempa is under constant attack. A prominent heroin “corridor”, they are the victims of violence and carnage at the hands of gangsters and the cartel.

In order to gain the Mexican government’s attention, the Ayahualtempa villagers dress their children up as soldiers. Then, they invite the media in.

Ayahualtempa
via Getty Images

When reporters arrive, the children of Ayahualtempa dutifully line up and put on a performance. They march, they show how they would shoot a gun from one knee, or from flat on their bellies. They tell reporters that their mock-violent performance is “so the president sees us and helps us,” as a 12-year-old child named Valentín told the Associated Press.

Because the Mexican government doesn’t protect Ayahualtempa, the display of child soldiers is a form of protest for the small indigenous village. The people of this remote region of Guerrero want protection from the National Guard, and financial help for widows and orphans who have been made so from organized crime.

The villagers don’t trust local authorities, and for good reason. Guerrera is the Mexican state in which 43 teaching students were abducted and killed in an event that is known as the “Iguala mass kidnapping”. Authorities arrested 80 suspects in connection to the event. 44 of them were police officers, working in conjunction with a network of cartels.

Although the demonstrations function largely as a publicity stunt, violence is very much a part of these children’s lives.

via Getty Images

Parents train their children to walk to school with loaded guns, ready to defend themselves against violent gangsters.

The attention-grabbing antics have, to some extent, worked. On one occasion, the government donated some housing material. On another, benefactors gave the community’s orphans and widows scholarships and houses. But as soon as the periodic media storms die down, the federal government continues pretending Ayahualtempa doesn’t exist.

The hypocrisy of the government’s response is frustrating to many. “We’ve normalized that these children don’t eat, are illiterate, are farm workers. We’re used to the Indians dying young, but, ‘How dare they arm them!’” said local human rights activist Abel Barrera to the AP, with a heavy dose of sarcasm.

As for now, until the government moves to protect the community, they say they will continue their demonstrations. “They see that the issue of the children is effective for making people take notice and they think: If that’s what works, we’ll have to keep doing it,” said Barrera.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Entertainment

Spanish Voiceover Actress For Jessie From Pokémon Dies And Fans Mourn

Pokémon fans in Latin America are mourning the death of Diana Pérez, the Spanish-language voice of Jessie of Pokémon’s Team Rocket. The voice actress has been voicing the character since 1997.

Diana Pérez, the voice actress of Team Rocket’s Jessie, died at 51.

Lalo Garza, a famed voice actor in Mexico, confirmed the death of the Pokémon voice actress.

“Rest in peace Diana Pérez, a strong, cultured, intelligent, and very talented woman. You are good now, friend. Nothing hurts anymore. Have a good trip,” reads the tweet.

Pérez has been a staple in the Spanish-language Pokémon fandom for decades.

Pérez was more than just he voice of Jessie. The voice actress was the voice of multiple anime characters including Luffy in One Piece and Kagura in Inuyasha. In recent years, Pérez had started branching out to directing, producing, and other branches in the entertainment industry.

Pérez’s death is being mourned by Pokémon fans outside of the Spanish-language fandom.

Sarah Natochenny is the English voice of Ash Ketchum in the Pokémon series, Jessie’s mortal enemy. The death of Pérez has impacted the larger Pokémon community. Pérez was a pivotal part of the Latin American Pokémon community for decades and her loss has devastated fans.

Descansa en paz, Diana.

There have been no plans announced for a replacement to voice Team Rocket’s Jessie. No official cause of death has been released either. Our hearts and thoughts go out to Pérez’s family and the greater Pokémon community mourning her passing.

READ: I Was Today Years Old When I Found Out This Mexican Pokémon

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com