Culture

Locals Kicked This Gringo Out Of Tepito After He Denounced Santa Muerte And Told Them Jesus Is Their Savior

Mexico City’s Tepito neighborhood – also known as Barrio Bravío – is one of the city’s most infamous. It’s so often used as the backdrop for TV shows and movies, depicting it as a lawless zone run by drug cartels. However, in reality, the neighborhood is much different than what’s typically depicted on TV.

It’s a neighborhood that’s home to a working class, close-knit community who have each other’s backs in times of crises and a community that’s strong as nails. So often Tepito is forced to support itself and police itself with little help from federal or local governments.

Despite it’s infamous reputation, a white missionary, from the United States, thought it would be a good idea to visit the neighborhood and preach about Jesus Christ while denouncing the community’s own beliefs.

A gringo missionary ventured into Tepito to preach about Jesus Christ in place of Santa Muerte.

A video which quickly went viral over the weekend, shows a gringo preacher (joined by a translator) walking through the streets of Mexico City’s Tepito neighborhood, carrying a headset microphone and bullhorn.

“I bless you in the name of Jesus Christ. We are here to tell you that we love and care about you. But we also come to tell you that Jesus Christ is the light that shines in all dark places,” he shouts at residents.

The leader of the Torch of Christ Ministries Christian Association, Philip Blair, went to “evangelize” the Tepiteños, asking them to stop worshiping Santa Muerte and turn to Jesus Christ.

With slogans like “Repent, Tepito, repent of your sins,” the gringo preacher wanted to “evangelize” the locals but the preaching mission didn’t go as planned. As the gringo attacked their beliefs and customs, the locals began to form a group and asked him to respect their beliefs and to leave Tepito.

In the now-viral video, you can see locals getting annoyed by this gringo denouncing their local beliefs and Santa Muerte.

Of course, as it’s to be expected when an outsider comes to invade a community to denounce their beliefs and culture, the locals became upset and asked the missionary to leave.

Doña Queta, who founded the altar of Santa Muerte in Tepito in 2001, interrupted the preacher’s speech and proceeded to throw him out of the neighborhood.

“Manito, excuse me, not here, don’t do that here […] teach yourself to respect others…,” Doña Queta told the gringo – among many other things that aren’t quite suitable for print.

Joined by a crowd of other residents, Doña Queta was able to push out the gringo for disrespecting local beliefs and customs.

And as Mexico so often does, Twitter erupted with memes.

For many, the news wasn’t at all surprising. As The U.S.’ southerly neighbor, the country has become some what used to gringos coming into the country to push their beliefs and customs – with zero respect for locals.

In one meme (above), there’s a hypothetical conversation taking place between the gringo missionary and Jesus himself:

  • Gringo: “Dear lord, I am going to preach your words.”
  • Jesus: “To where, my dear son?”
  • Gringo: “Tepito.”
  • Jesus: In the photo, you can see Jesus’ response.

Many pointed out just how lucky the man was, ósea that something worse didn’t happen.

In a neighborhood that is known for protecting itself from outsiders, what surprised many the most was the violence-free way in which the gringo was asked to leave.

Many thought the gringo had a death wish for venturing into an area known for its insecurity, but what happened was the exact opposite. The residents of Tepito demanded the gringo respect their beliefs or gtfo – which seems like a completely appropriate response if you ask me.

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This Hilarious Viral Video is Being Called the Latino Version of ‘Get Out’

comedy

This Hilarious Viral Video is Being Called the Latino Version of ‘Get Out’

Screenshot via xgabsterz/Twitter

We’ve all experienced it before–the nervousness of meeting your partner’s parents. And if you’re in an interracial relationship, that nervousness grows exponentially.

That’s why this video of a young Latino man who is hesitant about entering his white girlfriend’s Trump-supporting family’s house has gone viral.

It’s #relatable.

The video starts off with the unnamed boyfriend narrating what’s happening to him as his girlfriend practically drags him into her parent’s home.

In Spanish, he says “I’m going to visit my girlfriend’s parent’s house. The house is very beautiful and she wants me to go inside. But I’m not going to do that because there’s a problem.”

At this point, he pans up to focus on a “Trump” sign prominently displayed on the front lawn.

He turns the camera around to show his own very worried face. The young man’s girlfriend tries to assure him that everything is okay, promising him that her parents are “going to like you”.

The young man tells her to go on without him because he “doesn’t want to die” today. “Maybe tomorrow, yes. But today–no,” he says.

His girlfriend keeps insisting he follow her in until he finally says: “They don’t like me!” before zooming in on the “Trump/Pence” sign one final time. The comedic timing is *chef’s kiss* impeccable.

The video is captioned “This Spanish remake of ‘Get Out’–a witty nod to the 2017 horror film.

As a refresher, “Get Out” centers on a young Black man in an interracial relationship who visits his white girlfriend’s family for the weekend. Soon, he realizes the family is not quite as idyllic as they’re pretending to be. Before long, he realizes his life is in danger.

The movie accurately depicted the real-life horror of racism and white supremacy through a cinematic lens. Phrases like “the sunken place” (the place the main character went when he’s paralyzed by his girlfriend’s mother) became cultural shorthand for: the “place an oppressed person goes when they have become silent or compliant to their own oppression” (thanks Urban Dictionary).

Internet commentators chimed in with their own thoughts and opinions about the super relatable video.

One Reddit user knew exactly how the young man felt. “As a biracial person who dated a girl from a very conservative Republican family, they never let me forget that I was biracial,” he said. “They brought it up almost every day.”

Another knew the struggles of having family members with different views from their own: “I have friends and family members that have been radicalized.. it’s very difficult to have a conversation about anything anymore that doesn’t end with vitriol.”

Another Reddit user had more sympathy for the man’s girlfriend. “I feel bad for the girl honestly,” they said. “We may be able to choose who we befriend, but we can never choose our parents.”

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

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Mexico’s AMLO Wants To Launch New Social Media Network For Mexicans After Twitter Banned Trump

Hector Vivas / Getty Images

Love him or hate him, Mexico’s President Andres Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) has long called himself the voice of the people – and many Mexicans agree with him. That’s why his latest announcement against social media companies has many so worried.

In the wake of Twitter and Facebook’s (along with many other social media platforms) announcement that they would be restricting or banning Donald Trump from their platforms, the Mexican president expressed his contempt for the decisions. And his intention to create a Mexican social network that won’t be held to the standards from Silicon Valley.

Mexico’s AMLO moves to create a social media network for Mexicans outside of Silicon Valley’s control.

A week after his United States counterpart was kicked off Facebook and Twitter, President López Obrador floated the idea of creating a national social media network to avoid the possibility of Mexicans being censored.

Speaking at his daily news conference, AMLO instructed the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt) and other government departments to look at the possibility of creating a state-owned social media site that would guarantee freedom of speech in Mexico.

“We care about freedom a lot, it’s an issue that’s going to be addressed by us,” he told reporters. He also added that Facebook and Twitter have become “global institutions of censorship,” sounding a lot like the alt-right terrorists that stormed the U.S. Capitol.

“To guarantee freedom, for freedom, so there’s no censorship in Mexico. We want a country without censorship. Mexico must be a country of freedom. This is a commitment we have,” he told reporters.

AMLO deeply criticized the moves by Twitter and Facebook to ban Trump from their platforms.

Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty Images

AMLO – like Trump – is an avid user of social media to connect with his constituents. He’s also been known to spread falsehoods and boast about his achievements on the platforms – sound familiar?

So, it came as little surprise when he tore into social media companies for ‘censoring’ Donald Trump, saying that they have turned into “global institutions of censorship” and are carrying out a “holy inquisition.”

Nobody has the right to silence citizens even if their views are unpopular, López Obrador said. Even if the words used by Trump provoked a violent attack against his own government.

“Since they took these decisions [to suspend Trump], the Statue of Liberty has been turning green with anger because it doesn’t want to become an empty symbol,” he quipped.

So what could a Mexican social media network be called?

The president’s proposal to create a national social media network triggered chatter about what such a site would or should be called. One Twitter user suggested Facemex or Twitmex, apparently taking his inspiration from the state oil company Pemex.

The newspaper Milenio came up with three alternative names and logos for uniquely Mexican sites, suggesting that a Mexican version of Facebook could be called Facebookóatl (inspired by the Aztec feathered-serpent god Quetzalcóatl), Twitter could become Twitterlopochtli (a riff on the name of Aztec war, sun and human deity Huitzilopochtli) and Instagram could become Instagratlán (tlán, which in the Náhuatl language means place near an abundance of something – deer, for example, in the case of Mazatlán – is a common suffix in Mexican place names.)

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