Culture

LeBron James Has Filed A Patent Request To Trademark ‘Taco Tuesday’ And Everyone Is Like, Que?

LeBron James is always making the new for something and now it is because he wants to trademark the phrase “Taco Tuesday.” Now, he isn’t trademarking the phrase for anything food-related. James just wants to make sure no one can use the phrase when it comes to any kind of online services, podcasting, etc. So, if you’ve ever had a “Taco Tuesday” idea for something on social media, those days are numbered. The story is reminding some of when Snow Tha Product trademarked the phrse “Stay Woke” for tour merchandise.

LeBron James has been pushing out videos on social media celebrating his obsession with “Taco Tuesday.”

If you follow him on Instagram, you have likely seen his videos. The on above shows him screaming “Taco Tuesday” several times. To really let you know that he loves “Taco Tuesday” is when he gives us his version of a Mexican grito. It’s a subpar grito, but it does sound like an attempt at a grito.

James filed his trademark request seeking to own the phrase “Taco Tuesday” for “downloadable audio/visual works,” “podcasting services,” “online entertainment services,” and “advertising and marketing services provided by means of indirect methods of marketing communications, namely, social media, search engine marketing, inquiry marketing, internet marketing, mobile marketing, blogging and other forms of passive, sharable or viral communications channels.”

Some people are placing the blame on the people who let James believe his use of “Taco Tuesday” was somehow unique.

Credit: @LATACO / Twitter

“Taco Tuesday” is a phrase that has existed for decades. So many people have posted or created things for the internet that use the phrase “Taco Tuesday.” Latinos and taco enthusiasts combined are bewildered that the Los Angeles transplant thinks he can somehow trademark the phrase.

There is consistent and burning pushback against James’s wish to trademark the phrase.

Credit: @UralG / Twitter

Like, we get it. Ohio’s food isn’t that exciting. However, it isn’t cool to take food from an entire culture and trademark a phrase popularized by society at large. People understand the excitement over great tacos, but why take it to this extreme?

People are calling him out for going after Mexican culture.

Credit: @jerrymireles / Twitter

According to ESPN, James and his team have no plans for the phrase but they want to keep their business options open. However, is it a good business plan to be so controversial?

The phrase “Taco Tuesday” was around before James even played on an official NBA team.

Credit: @Peculiar_Pope / Twitter

Who else remembers the little señoras at your school calling it “Taco Tuesday”? It was low key the most exciting time for us in school. Tacos for lunch were the best and them landing on Tuesday was a holiday in the cafeteria.

There are some folks out there who are disappointed that the phrase is now ruined.

Credit: @TheVFCastro / Twitter

It is kind of hard to celebrate something that is being co-opted for a profit, especially when the profit is outside of the community. However, to be fair, there is already an active trademark for “Taco Tuesday” and it is from a company based in Wyoming. Taco John’s legally trademarked the phrase in 1989 and will send cease and desist letters when anyone uses it to promote their own Taco Tuesday events. However, what if we just called it Tuesday Tacos and took the power back from these people?

Some people on social media are defending LeBron James and his decision to trademark the phrase.

Credit: @exavierpope / Twitter

Sure. James isn’t trademarking the phrase for food purposes…because that trademark already exists. There is still the issue that trademarking the phrase the way they wish would severely impact Latino content creators. If you cannot use it digitally for entertainment, education, telecommunication services, advertising, etc, then you are taking it away from the community that relates to it on a personal and nostalgic level.

Until the decision is made, here is what a lot of people think about James trademarking “Taco Tuesday.”

Tbh, his yelling the phrase is something nobody can forget. It gets embedded in your brain after hearing it one time.

This one tweet sums up the overarching sentiment to the news of James’s trademark attempt.

Credit: @CScoot6 / Twitter

LOL

READ: Taco Tuesday Is Legally Trademarked But This Is Why That Doesn’t Really Mean Anything

Taco Tuesday: LeBron James Dropped Three Thousand Dollars On Tacos To Feed California Fires First Responders

Things That Matter

Taco Tuesday: LeBron James Dropped Three Thousand Dollars On Tacos To Feed California Fires First Responders

As Los Angeles firefighters worked through the night this Tuesday, to squash the blaze that has already burned through 600 acres, at least eight homes, and has caused damage to six, basketball star LeBron James thought of a simple and heart-warming way to help —and it involved hi love of #TacoTuesday and Mexican food.

LeBron James Sent Tacos To Getty Fire First Responders

Instagram @mariscosjalisco

The Los Angeles Lakers star rented out a taco truck to feed first responders on Tuesday, a gesture that was welcomed by Mayor Eric Garcetti, “Thank you @KingJames, for generously sending a taco truck to support our @LAFD firefighters, first responders, and partner agencies working to fight the #GettyFire,” Garcetti, wrote on Twitter.

The city of Los Angeles is close to James’ heart, and so is Taco Tuesday, his favorite day of the week. 

According to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, on August 15, James’ company LBJ Trademarks filed the application for future potential business ventures, including downloadable videos, podcasts, marketing, blogging and online “entertainment services, namely providing a website featuring non-downloadable videos and social media posts in the field of sports, entertainment, current events and popular culture.”

Unsurprisingly, the U.S. Patent Office didn’t approve of James’ patent request, and his attempt to trademark “Taco Tuesday” was denied because the phrase was already a “commonplace term.”

While the NBA star couldn’t acquire Taco Tuesday for his own personal gain, it was pretty awesome to see James using the term for good.

Instagram @mariscosjalisco

Mariscos Jalisco confirmed on Instagram that James had indeed rented out their services, and a rep for the Mexican food truck told The Blast the athlete paid $3,000 from his own pocket, to feed about 150 officials on the scene. 

“Shout out to @KingJames for generously sending over a taco truck to support our LA firefighters, first responders, and law enforcement folks that have been on the front lines fighting the #GettyFire,” California Governor Gavin Newsom, wrote on Twitter

Mariscos Jalisco is a famous Boyle Heights Taco Truck.

Instagram @mariscosjalisco

Though Garcetti didn’t share many details about the food truck, highly-rated Mariscos Jalisco took to Instagram to share the news. The taco truck shared their location as Jackie Robinson Stadium. The Mexican mobile restaurant is actually pretty well-known in the Hollywood circle and have hosted taco parties at John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s home in the past. After receiving James’ call, the truck got to work and cranked out over 600 tacos for the 150 officials at the scene, and we’re told nobody went hungry.

LeBron and his family were one of many families who were forced to evacuate after the Getty Fire broke out early Monday.

“Man these LA 🔥 aren’t no joke. Had to emergency evacuate my house and I’ve been driving around with my family trying to get rooms. No luck so far! 🤦🏾‍♂️,” he wrote on Twitter on the harrowing night he was forced to evacuate. 

“It’s just challenging at that hour, getting my family, getting my kids, getting everybody and having to evacuate at such a rapid rate,” James said, who after getting an evacuation alert at 1:30 a.m., packed up and found temporary lodgings at around 4 a.m. Monday morning. “You don’t really have much time to think about what you can get, or what you can do,” he said in an interview about the whole experience.

He also tweeted a message of support for the firefighters and police officers racing to the scene.

twitter @kingjames

“My best wishes as well to the first responders⛑ right now doing what they do best! 🙏🏾💪🏾,” he wrote.

In Northern California, firefighters are battling the Kincade fire, the state’s largest active wildfire.

In NorCal,first responders and evacuees in Sonoma County have been receiving hot meals courtesy of chef José Andrés’ non-profit World Central Kitchen, along with chefs Tyler Florence and Guy Fieri. On the menu for Tuesday, the organization tweeted that chef Chris Cosentino has been roasting up some local pumpkins.

The fires ignited as Southern California was facing an extreme fire danger due to strong winds. Red flag warnings were in effect across California.

twitter @AP

For the first time ever, an “extreme red flag warning” was in effect in Southern California for much of Los Angeles and Ventura counties. Gusts as high as 80 mph were expected. In Northern California, the massive Kincade Fire has grown to more than 76,000 acres. By Wednesday morning, it was 30% contained and had damaged or destroyed about 200 homes and other buildings. The state’s largest utility, Pacific Gas & Electric, said about 365,000 homes and businesses were without power after the utility cut electricity to some areas to avoid starting new wildfires.

Twitter Drags LeBron James So Hard After His Trademark Request For ‘Taco Tuesday’ Is Rejected

Entertainment

Twitter Drags LeBron James So Hard After His Trademark Request For ‘Taco Tuesday’ Is Rejected

KingJames / Instagram

I know I speak for many when I say there was a collective ‘WTF’ moment when news broke that LeBron James was trying to trademark the now ubiquitous phrase “Taco Tuesday.”

Sure, many of us are devout lovers (some may even say super fans) of the Mexican food classic. Like seriously, we stan all kids of tacos. Al pastor. Barbacoa. Vegano. Nopal. Bistec. Todos. But I would never think about trying to trademark a now popular phrase that has already entered the mainstream lexicon. Like maybe I’m just not that bold (slash delusional) but it just doesn’t seem like something a normal person would do.

Enter The King himself, LeBron James.

The King’s campaign to own ‘Taco Tuesday’ was flat out rejected on Wednesday.

LeBron James took a major loss today when in request to trademark the phrase “Taco Tuesday” was rejected by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. James, who has engaged his social media fans on Instagram with his videos of him and his family and friends eating tacos on Tuesday, was rumored to be looking to brand the videos and continue to do what he does best: make money.

The news that the request was denied comes from Darren Rovell, who tweeted out the decision on LeBron James’ request, which followed the L.A. Lakers’ star’s decision to try and trademark the commonly used phrase just a few weeks ago.

All this Taco Tuesday madness began when it was reported that James had filed a trademark request for the phrase.

James filed the trademark late last month through his company, LBJ Trademarks LLC, with the intention of using “Taco Tuesday” for “podcasting services,” as well as “online entertainment services… and social media posts in the field of sports, entertainment, current events and popular culture.” His company also acknowledged their plans to use the phrase for advertising and marketing services. It was only a matter of time until LeBron James attempted to monetize “Taco Tuesday”. 

For weeks, LeBron has been yelling the phrase “Taco Tuesday” on social media and it seems like he’s trying to own the phrase for social media posts and an upcoming podcast.

James applied for the trademark after he began posting Taco Tuesday posts on his social media channels, showing his family enjoying, you guessed it, tacos on Tuesdays (real original, James…)

Many scoffed at James’ trademark attempt, as “Taco Tuesday” is, as the government decided, an extremely common phrase, but according to James’ spokesperson everything went according to plan.

And let’s not forget, a Wyoming taco joint already owns the official rights to ”Taco Tuesday.”

Unfortunately, for James, even though his “Taco Tuesday” request was reviewed, according to Josh Gerben, a small Mexican restaurant in Wyoming actually already owns the phrase, which is pretty hilarious when you consider every single taco joint uses it for marketing every Tuesday night.

Given the fact everyone likes to pile on LeBron James when something like this happens, social media had some pretty A+ reactions to the news. 

That’s right people! #TacoTuesday belongs to toda la gente! I don’t care how many coins you’ve got or what you do, you can’t take that away from us.

Some speculated as to what the basketball great may try and go after next…

Throwback Thursday, Casual Friday, Hump Day, Thirsty Thursday, Flashback Friday, Man Crush Monday…are they all at risk of being trademarked these days?

Many on Twitter claimed to have already filed their own trademarks for some of these popular hashtags. Some hope to beat others to the punch. But given the reason cited by the judge who rejected James’ request – that it already enjoyed popular widespread use – none of these are likely to be approved.

Some took to GIFs to express their emotions.

I mean that’s a pretty accurate depiction of what happened in this case.

While some on Twitter were upset about the supposed double standard happening with this case.

To many on Twitter, this was a classic case of cultural appropriation at work. A person from outside one community was trying to profit and capitalize off the hard work and culture of another community. Many were left wondering where the outrage was at?

Latino Twitter wasn’t having any of this crazy publicity stunt.

Though the group was small, there were several Latinos annoyed that someone from outside the community would attempt to profit off a food that’s important to a different community.

And some pointed out that only a person of privilege and wealth would be able to attempt something like this.

And it’s totally true. There’s a steep application fee just to start the process plus, in most cases, you need a lawyer to argue your case for you. Lawyers are not cheap.

There’s just one thing that this publicity stunt succeeded at…

I’m beyond craving some good tacos right now and no, it’s not Taco Tuesday. But maybe Taco Thursday could be a thing?