Culture

This Latina’s Chanclazo Costume Has Us All Terrified And Really Made Halloween A Time To Remember

Makeup artist Yvette Marie Gonzalez dished a collective clap back to all the Latina mamis who terrorized us with their chanclas. Gonzalez has been dishing gory zombie, creepy clown, and even adorable candy-corn-crowned Halloween looks all season. Yet, she saved the best, no, worst, for Halloween. What happened that fateful day? “I forgot the beans and my mom gave me el chanclazo,” she captioned a photo of an actual chancla bloodily embedded into her head. Fake blood is splattered around her scalp and down her temples as she serves lewks.

Every Latino knows the only thing we ever needed to fear on Halloween was the chancla.

Credit: Lifeasyvette / Facebook

Did you forget the beans were on the stove and they got burned? Chancla. Did you forget to take the chicken out of the freezer to thaw? Sinking, sinking, pit in your stomach because you know the chancla is coming. Gonzalez, based out of Donna, Texas, recreated our worst childhood fears in just two, horrifying hours. Since sharing the look on social media, it’s gone viral. It’s been shared over 22,000 times, and has nearly 5,000 comments and likes. The 24-year-old made a follow-up post to share her shock, saying “This is absolutely crazy! I would’ve never thought that a small concept I had when I started my 16 Days Till Halloween would reach this many people is beyond me! 😅 Thank you for all the shares, likes, & comments! Happy Halloween 🎃🖤”

“This really is for the culture sis,” commented one fan.

Credit: Lifeasyvette / Facebook

“A true Hispanic Halloween,” commented another admirer. “Even scarier than La Llorona…..La Chancla! You KILLED IT with this one,” a friend writes. Dozens of comments are telling Gonzalez that she “won” Halloween. Basically, we Adult Children of Latina Moms (ACLM) feel seen as heck. “I get PTSD just looking at this 😂😂😂 you definitely killed it!!! 😍😍,” commented one obvious ACLM. A knowing father decided to loop us all in, saying, “*olvidaron* sweetheart. I love the chanclaso right in the forehead. It’s all our mama’s dream comes true but also their guilty nightmare hahaha.” Of course, Latina moms are already commenting, “Yes! I’m showing this to my kids as a warning! 💀” Oh, no, Gonzalez, what have we done.

Gonzalez has basically raised all our childhood horror stories from the grave.

Credit: Lifeasyvette / Facebook

While employing our gifted sense of denial of child abuse, Latinos are filling the comments with funny stories from their childhood. “Then your mom’s like “Ay no te paso nada eres bien exagerada. Tu tienes la culpa por no hacerme caso si te hable muchas veces” (she only called you 1 time and you were busy with another chore😂😂😂😂),” commented one fan, who accurately describes our moms telling us we’re overexaggerating how hard they hit. Typically, the vast majority of our experiences with la chancla was the simple threat of a mom taking off her chancla. She’d point it at us and threaten, “Te calmas o te calmo.” Usually, that was enough to get us to stop with the pendejería but it’s safe to say we all may have narrowly missed a scene like this one.

Gonzalez didn’t wear the chancla for Halloween, fearing it would strike too much additional trauma on the younger members of her family.

Credit: Lifeasyvette / Facebook

Gonzalez did more than apply makeup to get the look just right. We all know, exactamente, how heavy a chancla is when it’s flying across the room or repeatedly in your face. Gonzalez had to shave down the sole of the chancla to make it light enough to stay upright on her head, according to a local news outlet. Then, she used liquid latex to get the chancla to stick to her head, and cotton balls and tissue paper, presumably, to prop the chancla up. Given Gonzalez’s finesse with fake blood in previous looks, we’d say she was made to perfect the chanclazo horror look.

The lesson here: mamis, keep giving us el chanclazo and we’ll grow up to be talented makeup artists that put your savagery on full display to The Internet.

Credit: Lifeasyvette / Facebook

Thus far, Gonzalez’s mom has not spoken out, but we’d like to file a petition to view the video we hope Gonzalez recorded of her mom’s reaction. Were there chanclas involved? Or was she scared straight? Maybe we’ll never know. Regardless, we’re with the Latino Internet. You win Halloween 2019, Yvette.

READ: We Roundup Our Favorite Halloween Costumes From The Year Submitted By Mitú Fans

A PhD Student Made History By Writing Her Entire Thesis In An Indigenous Peruvian Language

Culture

A PhD Student Made History By Writing Her Entire Thesis In An Indigenous Peruvian Language

Lino Obarallumbo / DailySol

Scholars at Lima’s San Marcos university say it’s the first time a student has written and defended a thesis entirely in a native language. Roxana Quispe Collantes made history when she verbally defended and wrote her thesis in Quechua, a language of the Incas. While Quechua is spoken by 8 million people in the Andes with half of them in Peru, it speaks volumes that this hasn’t happened before at the 468-year-old university, the oldest in the Americas. 

Quispe Collantes studied Peruvian and Latin American literature with a focus on poetry written in Quechua. The United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages program has Peru a part of a global campaign to revive 2,680 indigenous languages at risk of going extinct. Peru is home to 21 of those languages. 

Roxana Quispe Collantes brings Inca culture to her doctoral candidacy.

Quispe Collantes began her presentation with a traditional Inca thanksgiving ceremony. She presented her thesis “Yawar Para” (or blood rain) by using coca leaves and chicha, a corn-based alcoholic beverage in the ritual.

For seven years, the student studied Andrés Alencastre Gutiérrez, a poet who wrote in Quechua, and used the pen name Kilku Warak’aq. For her thesis, she analyzed his mixture of Andrean traditions and Catholicism. 

“I’ve always wanted to study in Quechua, in my original language,” she told the Observer

Quispe Collantes traveled to highland communities in the Canas to confirm the definitions of words in the Collao dialect of Quechua used in the Cusco region. 

“I needed to travel to the high provinces of Canas to achieve this translation and the meaning of toponyms that I couldn’t find anywhere,” she said. “I asked my parents, my grandparents and teachers, and [it didn’t prove fruitful].”

Quechua entering the academic discourse can help preserve it. 

“Quechua doesn’t lack the vocabulary for an academic language. Today many people mix the language with Spanish,” she said. “I hope my example will help to revalue the language again and encourage young people, especially women, to follow my path. It’s very important that we keep on rescuing our original language.”

Her doctoral adviser Gonzo Espino told The Guardian he believes Quispe Collantes’ thesis was a symbolic gesture. 

“[The language] represented the most humble people in this part of the world: the Andeans, who were once called ‘Indians’. Their language and culture has been vindicated,” he said. 

It should go without saying but the doctoral candidate received top marks on her project.

Quechua is the most widely spoken indigenous language in South America. 

The oldest written records of Quechua were in 1560 in Grammatica o arte de la lengua general de los indios de los reynos del Perú by Domingo de Santo, a missionary who learned and wrote the language. Before the expansion of the Inca Empire, Quechua spread across the central Andes. The language took a different shape in the Cusco region where it was influenced by neighboring languages like Aymara. Thus, today there is a wide range of dialects of Quechua as it evolved in different areas. 

In the 16th century, the Inca Empire designated Quechua as their official language following the Spanish conquest of Peru. Many missionaries and members of the Catholic Church learned Quechua so that they could evangelize Indigenous folks. 

Quispe Collantes grew up speaking the language with her parents and grandparents in the Acomayo district of Cusco. Quechua today is often mixed with Spanish and she hopes that “Yawar Para” will inspire others to revisit the original form. 

Peru takes Quechua to the mainstream. 

Under the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages campaign, this year, Peru began the official registration of names in its 48 indigenous languages.

The U.N. launched its initiative to preserve indigenous languages in 2019 after the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues determined that, “40 percent of the estimated 6,700 languages spoken around the world were in danger of disappearing. The fact that most of these are indigenous languages puts the cultures and knowledge systems to which they belong at risk.”

According to the Guardian, for years, Peruvian registrars refused to recognize indigenous names on public records. They would then force indigenous people to register Hispanic or English-sounding names on government forms while keeping their real names at home. 

“Many registrars tended not to register indigenous names, so parents felt the name they had chosen wasn’t valued,” said Danny Santa María, assistant manager of academic research at Reniec. “We want to promote the use of indigenous names and recognize the proper way to write them on birth certificates and ID documents.”

In 2016, Peru began airings its first news broadcast in Quechua and other native languages, ushering into the mainstream. 

“My greatest wish is for Quechua to become a necessity once again. Only by speaking it can we revive it,” Quispe Collantes said.

An Ohio Teacher Used A Racist Meme About Dora The Explorer To Discuss Voter Eligibility

Things That Matter

An Ohio Teacher Used A Racist Meme About Dora The Explorer To Discuss Voter Eligibility

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A West Geauga High School teacher in Ohio is being investigated for using a racist image in class. The teacher showed students a meme of Dora the Explorer portrayed as an undocumented immigrant during an 11th-grade Advanced Placement government class. 

Multiple parents called the school district to express outrage and vented about the incident on social media. Some parents even pointed out that besides being offensive the information the photo was supposed to convey was inaccurate, according to Fox 8

The teacher was put on leave pending an investigation but eventually reinstated by the superintendent. 

An Ohio teacher uses a racist meme about Dora the Explorer to discuss voter eligibility.

The teacher used two photos to demonstrate voter ineligibility. One showed the mugshot of an alt-right man with a felon, the other showed Dora the Explorer with the charges of “illegal border crossing” and “resisting arrest.” One of the upset parents, Stephanie Anderson, expressed that the lesson was inaccurate according to Fox 8. Anderson noted that undocumented citizens would obviously not be allowed to vote so listing their charges would be pointless. However, the offenses that are listed are not felons but misdemeanors. 

“I was outraged,” said Anderson, “Whether this teacher intended it to be a joke, something he found online it’s simply inappropriate and outrageous.”

“Seeing that white supremacist juxtaposed with a brown-skinned child who has a superimposed black eye, blood coming from her mouth with the offense of illegal border crossing and resisting arrest combined with 666 666666 is 100% inappropriate,” she said. “There are so many other more appropriate ways to get your point across.”

The Superintendent released a statement to parents. 

“We are investigating the matter related to the politically-insensitive slides allegedly contained in a teacher’s classroom presentation today. The teacher has been placed on leave pending the results of the investigation,” Superintendent Richard Markwardt, Ph. D wrote in a statement to parents. 

While the teacher was put on leave, Anderson was hopeful that the entire district understood the gravity of the situation. The mother, whose son was in the class, believes the classroom is not a place for a teacher to impose their personal political beliefs. 

“It’s not okay for either extreme,” said Anderson, “So whether you are very liberal or very conservative at either end of the spectrum, imparting your views on your students in a non-educationally beneficial way is unacceptable.”

The Washington Post followed up on the story and found that Markwardt had already finished investigating. He told the paper he recognized the inappropriateness of the imagery but didn’t think the teacher had any ill will and refused to terminate them. 

“I will not use what I regard as a lapse of judgment as the reason to damage the career of a good teacher,” Markwardt said. “That would be following one mistake with another.”

Anderson told the Washington Post that the school district has struggled with addressing diversity and inclusivity, but that she was satisfied with the school’s response. 

“I genuinely believe they’re taking measurable steps to ensure all the students in the district can come to school in an environment that’s free from harassment and discrimination,” Anderson said.

Markwardt said some individual staff members may require diversity training, but the district overall will continue to focus on the matter. 

“I perceive the use of the objectionable image as symptomatic of a general lack of attention to the diversity of individuals in a largely homogeneous school district,” he said.

The Dora meme is a decade old and you can thank Arizona SB 1070 for that. 

According to the BBC, the Dora meme first appeared in 2009 in response to Arizona Governor Jan Brewer’s SB 1070 Bill, which would propose the strictest immigration laws in the country. The bill that allowed law enforcement to demand documentation from anyone they thought “looked” undocumented and made it illegal to be caught without papers would eventually be struck down by the Supreme Court in 2012. The meme was used to illustrate the effects of the law, which some members of the right championed. 

University of Cincinnati sociology professor Erynn Masi de Casanova told the Washington Post that using a meme in like this in class can legitimize and trivialize the real lives of Latinxs. 

“Because Dora is what I call a ‘generic Latina’ stereotype, a fictional character without any identifiable national origin, people may feel comfortable projecting their ideas about Latinos onto her,” Casanova said.

However, Casanova did point out one silver lining to the disturbing incident. 

“It is heartening to me that students and parents were disturbed by this image that dehumanizes and makes light of immigrants’ struggles,” she said. “It seems they are learning something about empathy in spite of this teacher’s efforts to discourage it.”