Culture

Apparently Jesus Christ Appeared In A Cloud Formation And Faithfuls And Non-Faithfuls Are Losing Their Sh*t

A photo has gone viral showing what some are calling the shape of Jesus Christ in clouds over San Salvador Jujuy, Argentina. The community, which is made up of 275, 188 people according to the 2010 census. Now, people around the world are talking about the area thanks to the surprise cloud formation.

This is the image people claim shows Jesus Christ in the clouds over San Salvador de Jujuy, Argentina.

According to Fox News, San Salvador de Jujuy resident Mónica Aramayo saw the shape appear in the sky. At that moment, she too out her cell phone and took a photo of the formation and she posted ti to bless other social media users.

The photo has sparked a religious debate all over Twitter as users battle over its authenticity.

A lot of users chose to see the photo as a sign of Jesus Christ’s second coming. Some have been saying that Christians need to start preparing for the end of days.

Those who don’t believe in the religious message are letting themselves be heard.

There are an equal amount of people that are speaking up that the formation is just a formation. Several countries across the world have seen a decline of the Christian population. However, it does continue to be the dominate religion of the the world.

Some people went another way and just assumed it was a reflection of a statue of Jesus in Argentina.

Seems like a stretch but everyone likes to have their own theories. Seems like it would be hard for that to appear that far away but a theory is a theory.

So many Twitter users have chosen to believe in the message that it is a sign for the faithful servants of the Lord.

Honestly, we’re just waiting for our tías and abuelas to start sending this around with a blessing attached. It is only a matter of time before we see this photo all over our newsfeeds because of the very family members mentioned above.

This isn’t the first time this year that someone saw Jesus in the clouds. He even appeared in Italy.

Italian artist and chef Alfredo Lo Brutto was overjoyed when he captured a photo of what looked like a Jesus formation over the ocean. According to The Sun, the artist posted the photo to Facebook and it wasn’t long until the photo went viral.

It also isn’t the first time that Latinos have been overjoyed with finding Jesus in an inanimate object and set out to share it with the world.

In 1977, a Latina mother in New Mexico became the first person to spot Jesus Christ on a tortilla. As Angelica Rubio recalled for The Eater, the discovery of the tortilla convinced her mother to set up a dedicated shrine to the tortilla to make sure people could come to see the miracle. The tortillas, made by Rubio’s mother every morning, held a surprise one morning as she saw a burn mark in one tortilla that looked just like the Lord Jesus Christ.

Some people do have some very serious questions about why these Jesus apparitions are showing up in very specific parts of the world.

It is an interesting question, for sure. Why do these Jesus apparitions show themselves to believers and not non-believers? It is a curious situation when you realize that these Jesus apparitions haven’t shown up in communities that aren’t Christian in nature. But, who are we to judge? What do you think about the apparition?

READ: Quiz: Can You Tell the Difference Between ‘El Buki’ Marco Antonio Solis and Jesus?

Indigenous People In Guatemala Marched On Their Capitol In Support Of Evo Morales

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Indigenous People In Guatemala Marched On Their Capitol In Support Of Evo Morales

evoespueblo / Twitter

South America’s poorest country, Bolivia, is in the midst of a political crisis, and Guatemala’s indigenous people are marching in solidarity with ousted Bolivian President Evo Morales. After the Guatemalan government joined the United States in recognizing extreme right self-appointed Jeanine Anez as the interim president of Bolivia, Guatemala’s indigenous people expressed their outrage in an organized protest. Hundreds of indigenous people marched in Guatemala’s capital Thursday to protest the change of government, which they view as a coup d’etat of Bolivia’s first indigenous president. With a “Brother Evo, Guatemala is with you” banner in hand, the protesters marched toward a heavily guarded US embassy. The next day, Morales announced that he won’t be “taking part in new elections.”

Before Morales rose to the presidency, he was a campesino activist, representing indigenous traditions and customs under attack by the US government. “We are repudiating the discriminatory and racist coup d’etat that took place in Bolivia,” said Mauro Vay, march organizer and head of Guatemala’s Rural Development Committee. 

Protesters proudly waved the wiphala flags, an indigenous symbol of solidarity.

CREDIT: @UKREDREVOLUTION / TWITTER

This man held an image that told the story of a thousand words. As a child, Evo Morales’ family were subsistence farmers, which allowed him to enjoy a basic education. He later moved to grow coca, the raw plant used to make cocaine. During the U.S.’ “War on Drugs,” coca farmers were under attack. Morales rose to defend the campesinos from what he called an imperialist violation of indigenous culture. His protests may have led to several arrests, but his notoriety grew to elect him to Congress as the leader of the Movement for Socialism (MAS) party. 

In Paraguay, Bolivian ex-patriates went up against the police to rehang the wiphala flag at the Bolivian embassy.

CREDIT: @WILL_J_COSTA / TWITTER

Several indigenous residents of Paraguay arrived at the Bolivian embassy to hang the Wiphala flag, which was reportedly taken down. They faced police resistance but eventually succeeded. The next day, the flag was removed. 

In 2005, Morales ran against former President Carlos Mesa and won, becoming the first indigenous president of Bolivia. 

CREDIT: @BRETGUSTAFSON / TWITTER

Then, it gets murky. By the time his first term was over, MAS rewrote their constitution to lift the one-term limit on presidents. Morales ran for a second term and won. Even though he claimed he wouldn’t run for a third term, Morales claimed the first term didn’t count because it was completed under the old constitution.  So he ran again and won for the third time. In October 2019, Morales ran for his fourth term, and won by a small margin, prompting a recount.

Just 24 hours into the recount, Morales ordered the recount to an end and declared himself president over his opponent, former president Mesa. the Organization of American States (OAS) conducted an audit that flagged the election as possibly fraudulent.

The OAS is not in the service of the people of Latin America, less so the social movements. The OAS is at the service of the North American empire,” Morales later said. Still, protests erupted across the country.

In a quickly developing government coup, military chiefs removed Morales.

CREDIT: @FAFASCHMITT / TWITTER

On Nov. 10, General Williams Kaliman, the commander of Bolivia’s armed forces, decided, along with other military chiefs, that Morales should step down. Morales tweeted, “I denounce to the world and the Bolivian people that a police officer publicly announced that he is instructed to execute an illegal arrest warrant against me; likewise, violent groups assaulted my home. A coup destroys the rule of law.” He added, “After looting and trying to set fire to my house in Villa Victoria, vandalism groups of the Mesa and Camacho coup docked my home in the Magisterio neighborhood of Cochabamba. I am very grateful to my neighbors, who stopped those raids. A coup destroys peace.”

Mexico offered him asylum and sent a plane to escort Morales to Mexico City.

CREDIT: @EVOESPUEBLO / TWITTER

“This was my first night after leaving the presidency, forced by the coup of Mesa and Camacho with the help of the Police. There I remembered my times as a leader. Very grateful to my brothers from the federations of the Tropic of Cochabamba for providing security and care,” Morales tweeted. Right-wing Christian opponent, Luis Fernando Camacho, also called “Bolivia’s Bolsonaro,” led violent protests against Morales and his Indigenous supporters, burning Bolivia’s Indigenous Wiphala flag. 

Mexico, Cuba, Uruguay, Nicaragua, Venezuela, and Argentina have maintained that his removal from office was a coup. The United States, led by a right-wing president, has recognized Bolivia’s interim right-wing president as valid.

Morales announced Friday that he won’t run for president in the reelection “for the sake of democracy.”

CREDIT: @VERSOBOOKS / TWITTER

Morales resigned Sunday after protests left four people dead. “For the sake of democracy, if they don’t want me to take part, I have no problem not taking part in new elections,” Morales told Reuters while remaining in asylum. “I just wonder why there is so much fear of Evo,” he offered.

READ: A US-Backed Opposition Leader Has Declared Herself President Of Bolivia Amid Outrage At Her Comments About Indigenous Bolivians

These Twitter Memes Should Help You Tell The Castro Twins Apart From Now On

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These Twitter Memes Should Help You Tell The Castro Twins Apart From Now On

Washington Post / Tik Tok

Presidential hopeful Julian Castro and his twin brother Representative Joaquin Castro were featured in the Washington Post’s TikTok video. Julian and Joaquin are no stranger to being mixed up for one another. Over the summer Joaquin even grew a beard to create a visual distinction between the two after reporters were left vexed when the brothers entered a media room wearing similar suits. 

The Washington Post’s TikTok has featured viral memes of presidential candidates before, including a video of Andrew Yang dancing, and Beto O’Rourke standing on a file cabinet in the office.

Like always Twitter took the premise of the hilarious video and ran with it. Users began using the image of Julian in a slick suit and Joaquin in a casual dad sweater to create some fun compare and contrast memes. 

Julian and Joaquin create TikTok to help people tell them apart.

In the video, Julian and Joaquin lipsync to the popular song “Who R U” by JUFU. The Washington Post’s Dave Jorgenson plays the role of the media as the twins explain to the public who is who in an airport. 

“Maybe this will help y’all tell us apart,” Castro said in his caption of the retweet of the video. 

“Yeah, I’m the one that can actually dance,” Joaquin responded. The media has confused the twins repeatedly. 

Naturally, Twitter began to meme a snapshot of the TikTok. 

Twitter being Twitter, pretty much the entire political world chimed in with a resounding yes and the meme floodgates were opened.

Some folks used the opportunity to use the image of a dapper Julian and a laidback Joaquin to compare their lifestyle choices. I’d say “Tapas vs. Barbacoa y big red,” is pretty accurate.

Another user labeled Julian “Mi Tierra” and Joaquin, “La Margarita.” 

Julian’s staffers join in on the meme fun.

Julian’s National Press Secretary Sawyer Hackett chimed in with “Day 1 on the campaign vs. Day 300.” The sentiment might be a little too real as Julian’s presidential campaign warned he may have to drop out of the race if he doesn’t raise $800,000 by October 31. 

“If I can’t raise $800,000 in the next 10 days — I will have no choice but to end my race for president,” Castro wrote in a fundraising email. “If I don’t meet this deadline, I won’t have the resources to keep my campaign running.”

However, Julian’s deputy press secretary Liza Acevedo had a bit more fun roasting the candidate saying, “You vs. The guy she tells you not to worry about.” 

This one was far too relatable for many many people.

Joaquin Castro grew a beard so people would stop confusing him for Julian. 

Just this month, the San Antonio Express newspaper confused Joaquin and Julian – in their own hometown. In the paper, Joaquin is credited for launching the opening of a building that actually came into fruition when Julian was mayor. The twins have always had a sense of humor about the constant confusion. 

“There you go again…always taking credit for my feats. Did you put @mySA up to it?” Julian tweeted in jest. 

Over the summer, Joaquin got fed up and decided to grow facial hair to end the confusion. 

“I hadn’t shaved in like three days and I decided I’d just grow the beard back – and it does help so that people don’t always think that I’m running for president,” Joaquin told reporters in Washington, D.C. according to USA Today

He said he encounters mixups every day just about everywhere except the Capitol where people recognize him as a congressman. 

“Like in the airport or somewhere else – on the streets” he said, adding that at first it was funny but, “then after that, it’s like, I’m not running for president!”

Joaquin’s beard does not seem to help end the confusion.

Joaquin’s tactic wasn’t too successful as there have been quite a few mixups since. In September, Joaquin called out MSNBC for using a photo of him to discuss Julian’s candidacy. 

“You guys know that’s actually me, right,” he said. “I grew a beard. Do I need a face tattoo?” 

This isn’t the first time a presidential candidate’s TikTok has gone viral.

The Washington Post’s presidential candidate TikTok with the most views was previously held by Andrew Yang with 1.9 million views. In a couple of days, the Castro twins’ reached over 2.1 million views. 

Another fan favorite included Beto O’Rourke giving one of his famous speeches — standing on a file cabinet in the office.

The joke is a reference to a meme early in his campaign where he was photographed speaking to constituents while standing on a table.