Culture

These Food Trends That You Did For The IG Posts Should Be Left In The 2010s Where They Belong

Trends, by definition, come and go, and they affect every aspect of our lives, from our hairstyles to the way we decorate our living rooms. But just like perms and mullets, there are certain trends from the food world that were a little outrageous and/or ridiculous. We rounded up the trendiest food fads of the decade so you can remember all the random meals you shared on your social media #foodstagram. 

Sushirrito

View this post on Instagram

????➕????=????

A post shared by @ goldengate2rainbowgate on

Why limit yourself to tiny sushi rolls, when you can indulge in an entire burrito filled with all the typical sushi fixings. Plus, it’s far more convenient to trot around with a compact burrito than with an entire tray of sushi + chopsticks.

Acai bowls

As the food trends of the 2010s have taught us, people love bowls, superfoods, and yogurts. So it should come as no surprise that when the Brazilian sweet treat that features a smoothie-like base topped with fresh fruit and nuts hit the U.S., it became an instant favorite. Not to mention, the visual presentation is Instagram-perfect.

Quinoa

Rice is so 2008. This Peruvian whole grain, complete-protein swap can be found starring in Buddha bowls, oatmeal-inspired breakfasts, soup recipes, and even rice pudding remixes.

Avocado Toast

Someone put avocado on bread and deemed it a standalone meal called “avocado toast.” Innovation. Bonus points for showy garnishes on your avocado toast such as crispy prosciutto, a fried egg, Everything Bagel Seasoning, or apples and blue cheese. 

Burrito bowls

With the nationwide take-over of Tex-Mex eateries, like Chipotle and Moe’s Southwest Grill, the prominence of the burrito bowl hit an all-time high in the mid-2010s. Featuring all the fixings of a typical burrito, the bowl is an option you can feel good about because it ditches the tortilla wrap for a lower-carb alternative.

Cronut

Do you remember when New York went crazy for the cronut? This hybrid croissant-doughnut was invented (and trademarked) by Dominique Ansel at his bakery in New York, proving so popular that people started recreating them across the country —and the whole world for that matter.

Kombucha

Kombucha is a probiotic drink that’s having a bit of a moment. In grocery stores and Whole Foods across the nation, you can choose from about a dozen different brands and flavors, all of which have an artisanal quality that whispers “you are SOOOOOO taking care of yourself… you are.

Kale chips 

They’re crisp, green, salty, taste freakily like salted potato crisps —and they’re made from kale, the super trendy member of the cabbage family renowned for its high nutrients and celebrity fans.

Cauliflower pizza crust 

Cauliflower happens to tick more than a few of the boxes that characterize eating in the 2010s: it’s gluten-free, low in calories and carbs, and also works well as a meat substitute. In addition, the vegetable offers a hefty dose of fiber, it’s inexpensive, quick to cook and is versatile. Someone finally found how to put the bland cruciferous to good use.

Zoodles

Zucchini was just the beginning. As a result of this growing food trend of the 2010s, we’re spiralizing a true alphabet of produce, including apples, beets, cucumbers, sweet potatoes, turnips, and of course, zucchini.

Matcha everything

Food-forward Instagrammers are increasingly as likely to snap a picture of a matcha latte (using the hashtag #matcha, of course) as they are a cappuccino, and they can now do so at specialty matcha cafés cropping up across the country, from New York to California to Hanoi. Said cafes serve everything from croissants to cakes to cold-pressed juices, all infused with the magical green powder.

Tea-toxes

If you were on Instagram in 2013, you are probably aware of the ‘teatox’ trend. It comprised of two and four-week programs which allegedly used the ‘power of herbal teas to help you lose weight’, by supposedly ‘ridding the body of toxins’. A fancy way to describe a good old laxative tea.

Charcoal ice-cream

There are two kinds of food that exist solely to be Instagrammed. There’s the gregarious type, prefixed by “unicorn,” striped through with bright colors and dusted with glitter. And then there is its grim cousin, which exists in simple, stark monochrome. Over the last few years, the trend for black food has been growing. From black-bun burgers to black cheese —the most successful midnight-hued food fad was the activated charcoal ice-cream.

Pumpkin spice everything

Starbucks launched its iconic Pumpkin Spice Latte is 2003, and it started a craze that’s carried over into this decade. Today, you can find all sorts of pumpkin spice foods in the fall, like Pumpkin Spice Cookies, classic Pumpkin Spice Bread and even pumpkin spice toothpaste, no joke.

Rainbow desserts 

Rainbow-colored food really peaked in popularity during the late 2010s. Images of brightly colored milkshakes, bagels, and even grilled cheese sandwiches filled social media feeds. The color-dye trend garnered a title in tribute to the food’s whimsical appearance: unicorn food.

Poké bowls

In the ’90s, it was sushi, then came the poké. Someone put Hawaii’s poké in a bowl and it spread far and wide overnight. Yet another food bowl obsession for us to Instagram the hell out of.

Paleo

Eating old school—we’re talking hunter and gatherer old—was big news in the 2010s. Eliminate dairy, grains, legumes, and processed foods and sugars, and you’ll shed weight because you’re filling up on fiber, fat, and protein, say Paleo diet devotees.

READ: The Concha Burger Is Real And It May Be The Ultimate Food Mashup

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Viral Video Of Overworked Texas Dominos Workers Burdened By Snow Storm Goes Viral

Things That Matter

Viral Video Of Overworked Texas Dominos Workers Burdened By Snow Storm Goes Viral

Texas’s current power crisis from a devastating storm has disrupted power generation and frozen natural gas pipelines. The is historic storm has driven electric demand higher than the state has ever seen, but it’s not just electric energy being overextended as a result. It’s physical and mental human energy as well.

Recently, an image of two exhausted Domino’s Pizza workers went viral for showing the extreme exhaustion workers are experiencing.

In a post shared to News4sanantonio.com’s Chime In page a user by the name of July DeLuna explained “This Dominos in San Antonio. Working during this crisis. They had a weekend worth of food and it was gone within 4 hours. This team helped those that needed help. These are the essential workers that need recognition. They were the only pizza place open. Every pizza place was closed but dominos stayed open to help those in need.”

Little else is known about the exhausted workers in the viral image but it did rack up over 8K comments within hours of being posted.

“Dominoes better pay them for the shifts they’ll miss while they don’t have any ingredients. With this practical free advertising it’s the least they could do. Otherwise these kind people worked themselves out of already bad hourly pay,” one user commented.

“,As someone who works in the food service industry, the thought of selling out of all product in only four hours and how much work goes in to preparing that much food is unfathomable levels of nightmare fuel,” another noted.

In another response to the image, a Reddit user wrote “I cannot express to you how upsetting it is to be the only food source open during hard times, to still be open and show up to do your job with higher than normal levels of orders, and still get yelled at by management for not having orders out within a window of time.”

Images of overworked and stressed is nothing new of course.

Fast-food workers are often burdened by their field’s daily challenges. In 2020, food industry workers are being forced to endure customer abuse at even higher rates. Last year a TikTok video of a Subway restaurant falling asleep while in the middle of making a sandwich went viral.

“This is actually really sad. I can’t imagine how underslept she is. Not to mention the wage people get paid at Subway… She deserves better,” one TikTok user by the name of Monique Emilia commented at the time. The skincare influencer Hyram also commented writing “Poor thing… Can’t imagine how underslept she is, we’re too hard on service workers.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

CDC Warns Of Listeria Outbreak Linked To ‘Hispanic-Style’ Cheeses

Culture

CDC Warns Of Listeria Outbreak Linked To ‘Hispanic-Style’ Cheeses

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning everyone against “Hispanic-style” cheeses linked to a listeria outbreak. The latest food outbreak is attacking one of the most sacred things in our diets and people have a lot of opinions.

Listeria has been detected in “Hispanic-style” cheeses, according to the CDC.

According to a warning from the CDC, listeria has been detected in what they are calling “Hispanic-style” cheeses. This means that people should avoid queso fresco and queso blanco. The source of the outbreak is being tracked and there is some understanding about where the outbreak is coming from.

The CDC recommends that people avoid these cheeses right now and to make sure that the cheeses they buy are made from “pasteurized milk.” Listeria is a serious illness for the elderly, people who are immunocompromised, and pregnant people.

The CDC reports that Connecticut officials have found Listeria in some El Abuelito queso fresco. The cheese was purchased from a supermarket in the area where a patient purchased “Hispanic-style” cheese. The outbreak seems to be concentrated in the Northeastern United States and has impacted four states.

Seven people have been hospitalized because of the Listeria outbreak.

The announcement is a very personal attack for a lot of people. Queso fresco and queso blanco are very important for a lot of dishes in our cuisine and to go without, during Lent and Covid, is asking a lot of us.

People are kind of irked that the CDC didn’t use a different phrase to talk about the cheese.

We get that technically the cheese is in Spanish and that it is more commonly used in Latino food. However, the cheeses have names that can be used. Sure, there was no idea of the brand but would it really be that hard to say “queso fresco and queso blanco”?

At least it would have prevented other people from having to answer other people’s questions.

It’s called efficiency. Some news outlets were sharing images of yellow queso dip because it is also technically a “Hispanic-style” cheese but it not the cheese in question.

READ: Chuck E Cheese Is Advertising As Pasqually’s Pizza And Thank You

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com