Culture

These Food Trends That You Did For The IG Posts Should Be Left In The 2010s Where They Belong

Trends, by definition, come and go, and they affect every aspect of our lives, from our hairstyles to the way we decorate our living rooms. But just like perms and mullets, there are certain trends from the food world that were a little outrageous and/or ridiculous. We rounded up the trendiest food fads of the decade so you can remember all the random meals you shared on your social media #foodstagram. 

Sushirrito

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Why limit yourself to tiny sushi rolls, when you can indulge in an entire burrito filled with all the typical sushi fixings. Plus, it’s far more convenient to trot around with a compact burrito than with an entire tray of sushi + chopsticks.

Acai bowls

As the food trends of the 2010s have taught us, people love bowls, superfoods, and yogurts. So it should come as no surprise that when the Brazilian sweet treat that features a smoothie-like base topped with fresh fruit and nuts hit the U.S., it became an instant favorite. Not to mention, the visual presentation is Instagram-perfect.

Quinoa

Rice is so 2008. This Peruvian whole grain, complete-protein swap can be found starring in Buddha bowls, oatmeal-inspired breakfasts, soup recipes, and even rice pudding remixes.

Avocado Toast

Someone put avocado on bread and deemed it a standalone meal called “avocado toast.” Innovation. Bonus points for showy garnishes on your avocado toast such as crispy prosciutto, a fried egg, Everything Bagel Seasoning, or apples and blue cheese. 

Burrito bowls

With the nationwide take-over of Tex-Mex eateries, like Chipotle and Moe’s Southwest Grill, the prominence of the burrito bowl hit an all-time high in the mid-2010s. Featuring all the fixings of a typical burrito, the bowl is an option you can feel good about because it ditches the tortilla wrap for a lower-carb alternative.

Cronut

Do you remember when New York went crazy for the cronut? This hybrid croissant-doughnut was invented (and trademarked) by Dominique Ansel at his bakery in New York, proving so popular that people started recreating them across the country —and the whole world for that matter.

Kombucha

Kombucha is a probiotic drink that’s having a bit of a moment. In grocery stores and Whole Foods across the nation, you can choose from about a dozen different brands and flavors, all of which have an artisanal quality that whispers “you are SOOOOOO taking care of yourself… you are.

Kale chips 

They’re crisp, green, salty, taste freakily like salted potato crisps —and they’re made from kale, the super trendy member of the cabbage family renowned for its high nutrients and celebrity fans.

Cauliflower pizza crust 

Cauliflower happens to tick more than a few of the boxes that characterize eating in the 2010s: it’s gluten-free, low in calories and carbs, and also works well as a meat substitute. In addition, the vegetable offers a hefty dose of fiber, it’s inexpensive, quick to cook and is versatile. Someone finally found how to put the bland cruciferous to good use.

Zoodles

Zucchini was just the beginning. As a result of this growing food trend of the 2010s, we’re spiralizing a true alphabet of produce, including apples, beets, cucumbers, sweet potatoes, turnips, and of course, zucchini.

Matcha everything

Food-forward Instagrammers are increasingly as likely to snap a picture of a matcha latte (using the hashtag #matcha, of course) as they are a cappuccino, and they can now do so at specialty matcha cafés cropping up across the country, from New York to California to Hanoi. Said cafes serve everything from croissants to cakes to cold-pressed juices, all infused with the magical green powder.

Tea-toxes

If you were on Instagram in 2013, you are probably aware of the ‘teatox’ trend. It comprised of two and four-week programs which allegedly used the ‘power of herbal teas to help you lose weight’, by supposedly ‘ridding the body of toxins’. A fancy way to describe a good old laxative tea.

Charcoal ice-cream

There are two kinds of food that exist solely to be Instagrammed. There’s the gregarious type, prefixed by “unicorn,” striped through with bright colors and dusted with glitter. And then there is its grim cousin, which exists in simple, stark monochrome. Over the last few years, the trend for black food has been growing. From black-bun burgers to black cheese —the most successful midnight-hued food fad was the activated charcoal ice-cream.

Pumpkin spice everything

Starbucks launched its iconic Pumpkin Spice Latte is 2003, and it started a craze that’s carried over into this decade. Today, you can find all sorts of pumpkin spice foods in the fall, like Pumpkin Spice Cookies, classic Pumpkin Spice Bread and even pumpkin spice toothpaste, no joke.

Rainbow desserts 

Rainbow-colored food really peaked in popularity during the late 2010s. Images of brightly colored milkshakes, bagels, and even grilled cheese sandwiches filled social media feeds. The color-dye trend garnered a title in tribute to the food’s whimsical appearance: unicorn food.

Poké bowls

In the ’90s, it was sushi, then came the poké. Someone put Hawaii’s poké in a bowl and it spread far and wide overnight. Yet another food bowl obsession for us to Instagram the hell out of.

Paleo

Eating old school—we’re talking hunter and gatherer old—was big news in the 2010s. Eliminate dairy, grains, legumes, and processed foods and sugars, and you’ll shed weight because you’re filling up on fiber, fat, and protein, say Paleo diet devotees.

READ: The Concha Burger Is Real And It May Be The Ultimate Food Mashup

Does Anybody Really Know What’s Supposed To Happen After You Get The Baby Jesus Figurine In La Rosca De Reyes?

Culture

Does Anybody Really Know What’s Supposed To Happen After You Get The Baby Jesus Figurine In La Rosca De Reyes?

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Remember Día de Reyes when everyone cuts the rosca and hopes to god not to get the little niño Jesus? If you grew up Mexican, you probably know that whoever gets the baby Jesus figurine owes everyone tamales. But when is the tamal party? And most importantly—why? Keep reading to find out what El Día de la Candelaria means, what your abuelitas and tías are actually celebrating and how it originated —spoiler alert: it’s colonization.

February 2nd may be Groundhog Day in the United States, but in Mexico, and for many Latinos outside of Mexico, there is a completely different celebration on this date.

The religious holiday is known as Día de la Candelaria (or Candlemas in English). And on this day of the year, people get together with family and friends to eat tamales, as a continuation of the festivities of Three Kings’ Day on January 6. 

This is why your abuelita dresses up her niño Jesús in extravagant outfits.

For Día de la Candelaria it’s customary for celebrants to dress up figures of the Christ Child in special outfits and take them to the church to be blessed. Día de la Candelaria is traditionally a religious and family celebration, but in some places, such as Tlacotalpan, in the state of Veracruz, it is a major fiesta with fairs and parades.

February 2nd is exactly forty days after Christmas and is celebrated by the Catholic church as the Feast of the Purification of the Virgin.

Alternatively, this day also counts as the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple. The origin of this religious feast day comes from ancient Jewish tradition. According to Jewish law, a woman was considered unclean for 40 days after giving birth, and it was customary to bring a baby to the temple after that period of time had passed. So the idea is that Mary and Joseph would have taken Jesus to the temple to be blessed on February second, forty days after his birth on December 25.

The tradition goes back to around the 11th Century in Europe.

People typically took candles to the church to be blessed as part of the celebration. This tradition was based on the biblical passage of Luke 2:22-39 which recounts how when Mary and Joseph took Jesus to the temple, a particularly devout man named Simeon embraced the child and prayed the Canticle of Simeon: “Now thou dost dismiss thy servant, O Lord, according to thy word in peace; Because my eyes have seen thy salvation, Which thou hast prepared before the face of all peoples: A light to the revelation of the Gentiles, and the glory of thy people Israel.” The reference to the light inspired the celebration of the blessing of the candles.

In Mexico Día de la Candelaria is a follow-up to the festivities of Three Kings Day on January 6th.

On Día De Reyes, when children receive gifts, families and friends gather together to eat Rosca de Reyes, a special sweet bread with figurines of a baby (representing the Child Jesus) hidden inside. The person (or people) who received the figurines on Three Kings Day are supposed to host the party on Candlemas Day. Tamales are the food of choice.

This tradition also carries Pre-Hispanic roots.

After the Spanish conquistadors introduced the Catholic religion and masked indigenous traditions with their own, to help spread evangelization, many villagers picked up the tradition of taking their corn to the church in order to get their crops blessed after planting their seeds for the new agricultural cycle that was starting. They did this on February 2, which was the eleventh day of the first month on the Aztec calendar —which coincidentally fell on the same day as the Candelaria celebration. It’s believed that this is why, to this day, the celebratory feast on February 2 is all corn-based —atole and tamales.

This date is special for other reasons too… 

February 2, marks the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, which aligns with the pagan holiday of Imbolc. Since ancient times, this date was thought to be a marker or predictor of the weather to come, which is why it is also celebrated as Groundhog Day in the United States. There was an old English saying that went “if Candlemas be fair and bright, Winter has another flight. If Candlemas brings clouds and rain, Winter will not come again.” In many places, this is traditionally seen as the best time to prepare the earth for spring planting.

In Perú the Fiesta de la Candelaria is a festival in honor of the Virgin of Candelaria, patron saint of the city of Puno and it is one of the biggest festivals of culture, music, and dancing in the country.

The huge festival brings together the Catholic faith and Andean religion in homage to the Virgin of Candelaria. The Virgin represents fertility and purity. She is the patron saint of the city and is strongly associated with the Andean deity of ‘Pachamama’ (‘mother earth’). It is this common factor of both religions that brings them together for the festival. In 2014, UNESCO declared the festival an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The main dates of ‘Fiesta de la Candelaria’ are February 2nd – 12th.

El Chapo’s Daughter Is Using His Name And Face to Launch A Beer Brand After She Launched A Fashion Line

Culture

El Chapo’s Daughter Is Using His Name And Face to Launch A Beer Brand After She Launched A Fashion Line

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It seems like everybody today is trying to get in on the alcohol business. Whether it’s The Rock with a new tequila brand or Ryan Reynolds buying a gin company, it seems to be all the rage right now that even “El Chapo” is getting his own line of beers. 

Say hello to the “El Chapo 701” brand run by Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman’s daughter Alejandrina Guzman Salazar, who also is behind a fashion and lifestyle company built around her jailed father’s brand. The new line of beer, called El Chapo Mexican Lager, was unveiled for the first time to the public on Jan. 14 at a fashion trade show in Guadalajara, Mexico. 

“It hasn’t been released for sale to the public yet. I just brought some to display,” spokeswoman Adriana Ituarte told AFP, as the beer line is currently still waiting on government approval to sell beer in Mexico. The alcohol displayed at the trade showed brown, black and white labeled craft beer bottles with the Sinaloa cartel leader’s infamous mustache face adorned on them. 

Alejandrina Guzman Salazar’s company is banking on the idea that people will want to buy craft beer, labeled and named after her infamous father, at bars and markets in Mexico. 

Beer lovers won’t have to break the bank either when it comes to purchasing the new line of beer which comes in at 70.10 pesos, or about $3.73, for a 355 ml bottle. There is also the name of the brand, “El Chapo 701” which has an interesting meaning behind it. The “701” is a reference to El Chapo’s place on the 2009 list of the world’s richest persons from Forbes magazine (estimated at $1 billion). 

The “El Chapo” beer is expected to have a large fan base due to the notoriety of the imprisoned drug cartel leader and a growing market for collectible celebrity alcoholic beverages like these. The company is hoping that, besides just the name and branding of the beer, fans will actually enjoy the drink and keep coming back to it.

“I don’t know if we take the label off and the beer is good if it’s going to sell,’  Ituarte told the Daily Mail. “But obviously the brand gives the plus of sale, we continue with the idea that we are selling and as long as the product is good, people buy it and like it.”

Ituarte said at the trade show that the product will be sold at bars throughout Mexico that also sell stock craft beer, a market that has flourished in Mexico City in recent years due to the growth of microbreweries. The lager was produced by La Chingonería, a Mexico City-based brewery company. 

“This is an artisanal beer, with 4 percent alcohol. This prototype is a lager, and it’s made up of malt, rice, and honey so it’s good,” Ituarte told Daily Mail. “And the idea is for it to be sold at bars that stock craft beer.”

This is not the first time that “El Chapo” has seen his name being cashed in on by his family. There has been a clothing and accessories line made in tribute of Guzman.

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Salazar’s company has already cashed in on her father’s name with a line of T items such as t-shirts, belts, purses, and jackets all adorned with imagery of Guzman and the 701 logo. The brand has been quite successful in under a year of going public which shows the power of “El Chapo’s” name. 

Salazar isn’t the only one getting in on the drug lord’s name. Last March Guzmán’s wife, Emma Coronel, launched a fashion and leisurewear line, licensed by her husband. “I’m very excited to start this project, which was based on ideas and concepts that my husband and I had years ago,” Coronel told CNN in a statement at the time of the launch. “It is a project dedicated to our daughters.”

These dedicated “El Chapo” brands show the notoriety and the power of his name when it comes to marketing. If this new beer line is anything like the clothing and accessories already released under his name, there is sure to be a market for this too. 

Guzman is currently serving a life sentence at a supermax prison in Colorado after being convicted on drug trafficking and weapons charges in 2019. El Chapo was forced to forfeit $12.6 billion as part of his punishment.

READ: California Man Is Using His Culture To Create Hilarious And Super Relevant Mexican Greet Cards