Culture

This Week PR And DR Were Going AT IT – And I’m Not Just Talking About Baseball

Making fun of each other relentlessly is something Puerto Ricans and Dominicans do often, especially when we are up against each other in world events. As was the case this week with the World Baseball Classic.

Now that el fuego has died down, I wanted to take a moment to discuss the major burns that were happening this week before, during, and after the game, because people were going HAM on Twitter.

As a Puerto Rican, I got a good laugh in myself during the baseball game. ‘Cause sometimes, mi gente, we be wildin’.

What you can’t see in this photo is the three piece Puerto Rico flag suit he’s wearing.

But some folks just don’t get the rivalry.

I get it though, similar food, similar music, similar love for platanos.

Some people were coming hard for the Puerto Rican Adobo love.

What? You never brushed your teeth with Adobo?

Folks fortunate to have a bit of both in their lives were clearly conflicted.

Looks like he’s wishing he’d never been born.

This Twitter user was disoriented by the whole ordeal.

It’s like when your parents are fighting and you’re just like “Can’t we all just eat some tres leche and relax?”

Even the anthem got geeked on.

This updated anthem is modern, and everyone can sing along. We should just vote and make it official already.

Even with all the Puerto Rico shade, some took it in stride and kept it moving.

It’s hard to knock Puerto Rican pride when we represent for breakfast.

My fellow NYC Boricua wasn’t having it.

Word, yo. Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in the hood gotta look out for each other.

And then some folks spoke too soon.

In a thrilling game, Puerto Rico bested the Dominican Republic with a score of 3 to 1.

By the next morning, some were just tired of the comparisons and wanted peace and love.

Can’t we all just get along?

But for others, suspicion was on the rise.

I’d have been more nervous if it was a Morir Soñando.

Others were still licking their wounds from the loss and felt like throwing some more jabs.

To be fair, y’all know Dominican Spanish be fast AF sometimes.

By the following evening, everyone had said their piece, and the only sentiment that really matters was the one:

Mad corny, indeed, my friend. We are all poppin’.

READ: Mexicanos vs Puertorriqueños, Americanos vs Dominicans: 13 Storylines that Make the World Baseball Classic a Must-Watch

Were you watching this game while scrolling the beef on Twitter? Share with the links below!

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These Long-Time Best Friends Just Found Out They’re Biological Sisters

Things That Matter

These Long-Time Best Friends Just Found Out They’re Biological Sisters

Photo via Cassandra Raquel Madison/Facebook

We’ve all had those friends that are so close to us that they feel like they’re family. Well, in the case of these of two Connecticut women who had the same feeling, that ended up being the case.

Best friends Julia Tinetti and Cassandra Madison learned that they were biological sisters, adopted from the Dominican Republic.

The story is stranger than fiction. Julia and Madison met in 2013, when they both worked at a bar called The Russian Lady in New Haven, Connecticut. The women immediately bonded when they discovered that they both had tattoos of the Dominican Republic’s flag.

Cassandra rehashed the meeting via a Facebook post: “Julia notices the Dominican flag on my arm and makes a comment about how she’s Dominican too BUT she’s adopted from there. I stop her in her tracks and tell her I’m adopted from there too.”

“After that moment, we were so tight,” Julia told Good Morning America. “We started hanging out. We would go out for drinks, for dinner. We started dressing alike.”

Apparently, Cassandra felt the same way. “I thought she was cool,” Cassandra said to GMA. “We just kind of hit it off right away. It was very natural.”

According to them, coworkers were always telling them that they looked like sisters. But when the two of them cross-referenced their birth certificate, their information didn’t add up.

“Papers said we were from two different cities [with] different last names,” Julia explained. “And, our mothers’ names on our paperwork were different.” But the two women believed they were somehow connected–they just didn’t know how.

The mystery finally began to unravel after Cassandra took a 23andMe DNA test.

Through 23andMe’s genetic database, Cassandra tracked down her biological family in the Dominican Republic through a first cousin. She then traveled to the DR where she met her bio-family for the first time–an incredibly emotionally experience. While Cassandra’s bio-father was still alive, her bio-mother had passed away in 2015 from a heart attack.

Years later, Cassandra finally pressed her bio-father on whether or not he had put up another child for adoption. While at first he was hesitant to talk about the painful memory, he finally admitted that he had, indeed, put another child up for adoption years ago.

It was then that Cassandra finally urged Julia to take a DNA test so they could finally put their questions to rest.

The results came back on January 28th, 2021 and finally confirmed what they had long suspected: they were biological sisters.

The entire ordeal has been both thrilling, joyful, and emotionally taxing for the women. At times, it has even been bittersweet, considering the trauma their biological family endured in the past.

“On top of the DR being a very poor country, [our family] couldn’t take care of us,” Julia explained. “I was [born] 17 months later and they weren’t ready.”

All in all, Julia summed up how she feels about the situation in a very direct way: “This is the type of thing you see on TV.”

We couldn’t agree more!

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Olympian Laurie Hernandez Is Back And Just Gave A Powerful “Hamilton” Inspired Performance

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Olympian Laurie Hernandez Is Back And Just Gave A Powerful “Hamilton” Inspired Performance

She’s back! After an almost five-year hiatus, Olympic gymnast Laurie Hernandez made her big return to competition at Saturday’s 2021 Winter Cup meet with moves to remember — set to some pretty unforgettable music, too.

The 20-year-old gold and silver medalist hit the mat with a “Hamilton”-inspired floor routine.

Laurie Hernandez just gave a stunning floor routine at the 2021 Winter Cup.

Please welcome Laurie Hernandez back to the floor! After a four-and-a-half-year hiatus, the 20-year-old Olympian showed off her strength, proving, like Lin-Manuel Miranda wrote, she is inimitable and an original.

“My first priority [at Winter Cup] is to go in and hit clean routines and show that I can be consistent,” Hernandez told NBC News. “But my next one is to enjoy myself.” It sure looks like she accomplished her goal, with nonstop energy and a smile on her face throughout her entire choreography.

As “The Room Where It Happens” played in the background, Hernandez flipped and danced her way to a 12.05 score in the event, good for an 11th-place finish in the floor exercise.

And after the USA Gymnastics Winter Cup in Indianapolis wrapped up, the noted theater fan shared her routine on Twitter and asked for feedback from “Hamilton” creator Lin Manuel Miranda and actor Leslie Odom Jr. — who sang “The Room Where It Happens” as Aaron Burr in the original cast.

This weekend’s performance was her first since stealing hearts during the 2016 Rio games.

Hernandez was part of the Team USA “Final Five” squad that won gold at the 2016 Rio Olympics. But following those games she took a step back from competition, later revealing that former coach Maggie Haney was emotionally and verbally abusive toward her. The gymnast dealt with depression and eating disorders as a result.

Hernandez said it wasn’t until years later that she realized her love of the sport could be separated from the trauma she experienced. “I thought I hated gymnastics, and it wasn’t until mid-2018 I realized that it was the people that made the experience bad, not the sport itself,” she explained on Instagram.

Though she already has a gold medal from the team all-around and a silver medal from her 2016 individual performance on the beam, Hernandez is now ramping up for more challenging competitions over the next several months with the hopes of qualifying for the Olympics this summer. But with a crowded field vying against her for just four roster spots, securing a bid to Tokyo will undoubtedly be an uphill battle.

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