Culture

A Millennial Guatemalan Artist Gave Lotería Cards The Millennial Treatment And They Are Hilarious

The game of lotería is a staple in a lot of Latino households. It brings families together, or tears them apart, depending on who you play with, but it always leads to a great time shared with those you love. However, one Latino thought that the popular game needed a bit of an update to make it more relatable. So, with some inspiration and an artistic eye, Mike Alfaro took it upon himself to create new, “millennial” lotería cards. Sadly, these cards are not for sale but they are great to look at. Alfaro spoke with mitú about his inspiration for creating the cards.

This is Mike Alfaro, the brains behind the Instagram page @millennialloteria.

Amy celebrated bring your husband to work day today.

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Alfaro, who is originally from Guatemala, was back home visiting and researching for a project when he found his old lotería cards. He remembered them from his childhood but tells mitú that he was shocked at how outdated they were, so he took the opportunity to create a parody version of the timeless game.

The Guatemalan artist and writer has taken the classic style of the cards and paired it with things millennials can relate to, like “La Protest.”

“It became this parody of taking these illustrations that are already iconic and sort of slightly changing them a little bit to create some humorous contrast within this modern world and the world that lotería lives in, which is still stuck in the past,” Alfaro says about his inspiration for more relatable lotería cards. “[The older cards] aren’t as interesting to us as a phone or an app, which is something that’s more common to ours lives.”

As part of the millennial glo up, certain cards took on new meaning, such as La Dama, which became La Feminist.

Alfaro, who works in advertising, says that he spends a lot of time in his work judging and looking at creative projects or conceptualizing ideas. He says that skill definitely came in handy with this project.

When he first came to the U.S. for college, he was shocked how little people knew about Latin America and wants the cards to challenge the stereotypes he heard from classmates.

“Cell phones, for instance, are so prevalent in Latin America because now you don’t need to run the power lines down to village; now you literally just beam information there. It’s this modernization that people don’t really understand,” Alfaro says. “When I came to college, people would ask me, ‘How did you find the university, did you have internet back home?’ like they didn’t think that I had Internet, a cell phone, nor watched cable television. When I look at these lotería cards it feels like it’s so old-timey and I wanted to show that Hispanics’ lives are modernized, just as much as American life.”

“At the same time I want to poke fun at these stereotypes that people have about millennials,” Alfaro says.

One stereotype Alfaro is trying to dismantle with his art is the concept that millennials aren’t in touch with the issues.

“We live in a time where we really have to use our voices and talk. It might be parody art, but that also means that it’s art and it has to have a message,” Alfaro says. “I think there are so many things that politicians and Trump are saying about Hispanic people and it’s so offensive. This was my way of jabbing back and having a bit of a message to it without being too nasty.”

He’s also bucking the stereotype that being gay in the Latino community is not okay.

Alfaro says he believes that the millennial generation of American Latinos are a lot more accepting than our grandparents. Even though some brands are still not sure if it is beneficial, marketing-wise, to add LGBTQ pride themes for Latino audiences, Alfaro says that it should be promoted as something that is okay and normal because there is nothing wrong with being gay.

Alfaro has received a lot of attention for his millennial lotería art, it even became real product that is available for purchase.

“I am excited that people really want it,” Alfaro says. “I’m actually not marketing a lotería game because I would be competing against the actual lotería. So, in reality, I would have to work with them and if they see there is a market for this. Right now I’d be infringing on their rights if I tried to sell a game that was very similar to theirs, even though its a parody.”

And while Alfaro is letting everyone know that it is just parody art and not anything serious, who knows what might happen in the future.

Even if these never become a real thing one thing is for sure, the cards are funny and relatable af.

READ: La Sirena Just Met Her Match With This Queer Chicanx’s El Sireno Lotería Card

A San Francisco Mural Is Honoring An Undocumented Guatemalan Immigrant Who Was Unarmed And Killed By Police

Things That Matter

A San Francisco Mural Is Honoring An Undocumented Guatemalan Immigrant Who Was Unarmed And Killed By Police

cialuart / Instagram

The people of San Francisco have a lot of heart. Yes, the wealthy thrive there, and the homeless community continues to grow, but somewhere in the middle is an empowering group of fighters for justice. They do not back down but instead make their voices heard loud and clear. It’s a tight-knit alliance that is responsible for forcing change on all fronts of authority. San Franciscans are also incredibly beautiful at honoring fallen residents. 

Almost five years after 20-year-old Amilcar Perez-Lopez was gunned down by police in San Francisco, artists are honoring him with a massive mural in the Mission District.

Credit: crashgrammy / Instagram

The lead artist on this impressive artwork is Lucía González Ippolito, a native of the Mission District. The mural is titled “Alto al Fuego en La Misón” and the most prominent subject on the mural is Perez-Lopez, the undocumented young man from Guatemala. 

On Feb. 26, 2015, Perez-Lopez was fatally shot by the SFPD, who were in plainclothes in the Mission District. The officers reported that they “opened fire to protect themselves and others from a man who was acting erratically and was armed with a knife,” the SFGate reports. Witnesses told a different story. They said Perez-Lopez was running for his life, which is why he was shot in the back. 

The Perez-Lopez investigation went on for years, and in the end, the SFPD was never charged, but Police Chief Greg Suhr did resign from his post. However, it wasn’t just because of the pushback from the Perez-Lopez investigation but from multiple fatal shootings of unarmed people at the hands of the police. His parents eventually won a settlement from the SFPD

Aside from the artful depiction of Perez-Lopez, the mural also pays tribute to Black and brown people who have died as a result of police brutality as well as people who have died on the southern border.

Credit: amaya_papaya28 / Instagram

During the year in which he was killed, Perez-Lopez “was one of the 67 Latino people killed,” the Guardian reports. The publication adds that Perez-Lopez was also one of the 58 percent who was killed and unarmed. 

“‘Why didn’t you put in Jessica Williams?’ Or, ‘Why didn’t you put in this person?’ The truth of the matter is that we just didn’t have enough space,” Ippolito told the SFWeekly. “And I wish we could include a lot more.”

Ippolito said she and the rest of the mural team were confronted with the fact they didn’t have enough space to put every person that lost their life because of the SFPD. The mural is already one of the largest murals “to be painted in the Latino Cultural Corridor in a decade,” according to the local publication. 

“That was the hardest part,” Anna Lisa Escobedo, another artist on this project, said to SF Weekly. “From the community, a lot of people were saying, ‘We are missing this person, this person, this person.’ We could do five more murals and focus on people who had the same circumstances, and that is sad.”

This isn’t the first artwork that has honored Perez-Lopez.

Credit: msmichellemeow / Instagram

His painted portrait was seen throughout the streets of San Francisco when residents demanded justice in his death. A couple of months after he was killed, artist YESCKA painted a mural that included Perez-Lopez. The mural was painted on the sidewall of the gallery Red Poppy Art House, which is located just blocks two from where Perez-Lopez was shot and killed. 

The mural by Ippolito is pretty remarkable because of its use of bright colors, and the inclusion of Mexican motifs, both the Guatemalan and San Francisco landscape, and Perez-Lopez in his signature Giants baseball cap. But the mural is also representative of an altar of sorts. Perez-Lopez is pictured inside an altar, and the rest of the people that are honored in the painting are seen on prayer candles. 

The other deceased individuals on the mural include Roxana Hernandez, Claudia Patricia Gomez Gonzalez, and Oscar and Valeria Martinez, who died either on the southern border or in ICE custody. 

Credit: cialuart / Instagram

This mural is a perfect addition to the many outstanding paintings that the city of San Francisco has to offer. 

One of my favorite things to do when I am back in the Mission is to go on a walking tour to gaze at the stunning murals that depict the people of San Francisco, but also the history of our community.  

READ: One Of The Major Artists In The Chicano Art Movement Has Died At 75

16 Latin-Themed Christmas Ornaments That Will Spruce Up Your Tree ASAP

Culture

16 Latin-Themed Christmas Ornaments That Will Spruce Up Your Tree ASAP

allfreechristmascrafts / Pinterest

Christmastime is the one time a year that we can truly let our crafty side show. You can decorate your house however you please and no one can say a negative thing about it because it’s the holidays. The only issue is picking out a theme or opting to go with whatever you see at Target. Either way is fine, but why not show off the love you have for your Latin culture?

This year instead of just doing the basic green and red ornament styles that everyone seems to go for, choose some of these lovely Latin-themed ornaments that will definitely get the attention of your family and friends. We’ve searched the interwebs for the best Latin styled ornaments that you can either purchase or make yourself. Enjoy! 

A little Frida fun for the holidays.

Credit: Etsy

You cannot go wrong with these festive Frida Kahlo dolls for $13 on Etsy. They’re so cute, and perfect to have as decoration all year round. 

A disco Latin-themed Christmas tree.

Credit: DirectfromMexico

For those that have more eclectic taste and want to set a sophisticated tone, while also paying homage to your Latin heritage, we highly suggest these shiny retro ornaments from DirectfromMexico for $75.

A cactus kind of Christmas.

Credit: Mypoppet

If you have some time to spare, or would like to make a crafty side project with your friends and kids, these DIY cactuses are the cutest things to add to your tree. Need some help? Go to Mypoppet for instructions. 

Bella estrellas. 

Credit: Crafttel

Nothing says Christmas more than a star. It represents so much and they’re so beautiful as well. These estrellas that can also double as piñatas are perfect for your tree. Get them at Crafttel.

Tamales to eat and to decorate. 

Credit: Pinterest

While you and your family IS gathered around the table making tamales, be sure to save some of those smallish corn husks. As you can see from the picture above, they can make great ornaments as well, and you don’t need much material either.

Colorful yarn to spread around. 

Credit: MexicanBeautyShop

For a more intricate kind of DIY fun, these MexicanBeautyShop ornaments are simply delightful. And we should add again that they’re perfect wall decor even when it’s not the holidays. 

Merry Christmas maracas.

Credit: MexicanBeautyShop

The MexicanBeautyShop also sells these maracas that look great on Christmas trees. But if you want to access this look easier, just head out to any party store and purchase maracas and then tie them to a string to hang on your tree. Pretty easy. 

The Loteria cards can go a long way. 

Credit: Pinterest

We love Loteria more than anything else, so why not celebrate that during Christmas time? For this idea, just buy a Loteria game that you won’t mind cutting up. Laminate each card that you wish to have on your tree, and that’s it!

Dolls for days!

Credit: Buganvillaimports

These Latin dolls, sold at Buganvillaimports, are perfectly festive for Christmas. You can also give them away as Christmas favors. People will love them. 

A piñata for everyone!

Credit: Buganvillaimports

You can get these mini piñatas at any bodega, party store, or Latin store. Buganvillaimports sells them too. If you put candy in them, you can hand these out to family and friends as well.

Ornaments with a twist of fun.

Credit: allfreechristmascrafts

If you have Loteria cards to spare, gluing them to old ornaments works just as well. All you need is glue and glitter and you’re set. 

Day of the Dead, Christmas-Style

Credit: Etsy

Who says Day of the Dead can’t be celebrated at Christmas. Bring out your Dia de los Muertos decor and place it on your tree. So inventive and resourceful. 

A real fiesta Christmas.

Credit: Etsy

While these paper ornaments are a bit more detailed and complicated to make at home, you can purchase them on Etsy

Mexi-Galore glam for the holidays.

Credit: Pinterest

We can certainly bet you have a lot of Latin trinkets at home. If you have super tiny stuff, you can plop them in your tree, just stuff them in there, and your tree will be instantly Latin-themed.

Tender and sweet, Latin Christmas tree.

Credit: Pinterest

These amazing colorful ornaments made of plush and yarn would make any humdrum tree a beautiful one. 

Ranchera holiday-themed tree.

Credit: Etsy

For Tex-Mex folks or lovers of Texas-style, we highly recommend these plush ornaments on Etsy.

Happy holidays, everyone!

READ: Here’s Why Everyone Should Celebrate Nochebuena At Least Once With Their Latino Friends