Culture

A Millennial Guatemalan Artist Gave Lotería Cards The Millennial Treatment And They Are Hilarious

The game of lotería is a staple in a lot of Latino households. It brings families together, or tears them apart, depending on who you play with, but it always leads to a great time shared with those you love. However, one Latino thought that the popular game needed a bit of an update to make it more relatable. So, with some inspiration and an artistic eye, Mike Alfaro took it upon himself to create new, “millennial” lotería cards. Sadly, these cards are not for sale but they are great to look at. Alfaro spoke with mitú about his inspiration for creating the cards.

This is Mike Alfaro, the brains behind the Instagram page @millennialloteria.

Amy celebrated bring your husband to work day today.

A post shared by mike alfaro (@heyguata) on

Alfaro, who is originally from Guatemala, was back home visiting and researching for a project when he found his old lotería cards. He remembered them from his childhood but tells mitú that he was shocked at how outdated they were, so he took the opportunity to create a parody version of the timeless game.

The Guatemalan artist and writer has taken the classic style of the cards and paired it with things millennials can relate to, like “La Protest.”

“It became this parody of taking these illustrations that are already iconic and sort of slightly changing them a little bit to create some humorous contrast within this modern world and the world that lotería lives in, which is still stuck in the past,” Alfaro says about his inspiration for more relatable lotería cards. “[The older cards] aren’t as interesting to us as a phone or an app, which is something that’s more common to ours lives.”

As part of the millennial glo up, certain cards took on new meaning, such as La Dama, which became La Feminist.

Alfaro, who works in advertising, says that he spends a lot of time in his work judging and looking at creative projects or conceptualizing ideas. He says that skill definitely came in handy with this project.

When he first came to the U.S. for college, he was shocked how little people knew about Latin America and wants the cards to challenge the stereotypes he heard from classmates.

“Cell phones, for instance, are so prevalent in Latin America because now you don’t need to run the power lines down to village; now you literally just beam information there. It’s this modernization that people don’t really understand,” Alfaro says. “When I came to college, people would ask me, ‘How did you find the university, did you have internet back home?’ like they didn’t think that I had Internet, a cell phone, nor watched cable television. When I look at these lotería cards it feels like it’s so old-timey and I wanted to show that Hispanics’ lives are modernized, just as much as American life.”

“At the same time I want to poke fun at these stereotypes that people have about millennials,” Alfaro says.

One stereotype Alfaro is trying to dismantle with his art is the concept that millennials aren’t in touch with the issues.

“We live in a time where we really have to use our voices and talk. It might be parody art, but that also means that it’s art and it has to have a message,” Alfaro says. “I think there are so many things that politicians and Trump are saying about Hispanic people and it’s so offensive. This was my way of jabbing back and having a bit of a message to it without being too nasty.”

He’s also bucking the stereotype that being gay in the Latino community is not okay.

Alfaro says he believes that the millennial generation of American Latinos are a lot more accepting than our grandparents. Even though some brands are still not sure if it is beneficial, marketing-wise, to add LGBTQ pride themes for Latino audiences, Alfaro says that it should be promoted as something that is okay and normal because there is nothing wrong with being gay.

Alfaro has received a lot of attention for his millennial lotería art, it even became real product that is available for purchase.

“I am excited that people really want it,” Alfaro says. “I’m actually not marketing a lotería game because I would be competing against the actual lotería. So, in reality, I would have to work with them and if they see there is a market for this. Right now I’d be infringing on their rights if I tried to sell a game that was very similar to theirs, even though its a parody.”

And while Alfaro is letting everyone know that it is just parody art and not anything serious, who knows what might happen in the future.

Even if these never become a real thing one thing is for sure, the cards are funny and relatable af.

READ: La Sirena Just Met Her Match With This Queer Chicanx’s El Sireno Lotería Card

This Viral Photo Is Forcing A Conversation About The Right Time To Share Relationship Info On Social Media

Culture

This Viral Photo Is Forcing A Conversation About The Right Time To Share Relationship Info On Social Media

Facebook

“It’s not official until it’s on Instagram!” That’s the gag-ensuing line you hear when a couple goes from casually dating to 100 percent exclusive. The same goes for Facebook. If you’ve recently gotten married, the first thing you do is change your status from single to married. It’s a big deal especially to those that live on the internet. Changing your status on Facebook is every person’s dream — if, again, you want the whole world to know about your life. If you are indeed one of those people — and we’re not shaming anyone for it — the real question is: when do you make that online change? When do you choose to inform your Facebook friends that you’re finally officially married? Do you wait until you’ve gotten back from your honeymoon? Or do you do it sooner, perhaps on your wedding night? 

A couple named Danielle and James decided the perfect time to change their Facebook status from single to married was in the middle of their ceremony.

Credit: Facebook

The image was posted on a Facebook group titled “That’s It, I’m Wedding Shaming” and was reported by the Daily Mail. The shamer covered the couple’s face and captioned the picture by writing, “Instead of doing a unity candle or sand ceremony, Danielle & James changed their Facebook statuses to ‘married.'” 

Now we can’t say for certain this couple chose to change their status to married at that exact time, but they are clearly on their phones while standing at the altar. As the publication notes, perhaps the couple used their cell phones to read their wedding vows. 

What’s interesting about this picture is that we can’t see the reaction of their wedding guests. We’d really love to know if they’re supportive during this moment or if they’re cringing at their disrespectful timing. 

The picture was posted on a wedding shaming Facebook group and sure enough, people mocked the couple’s “tacky” behavior.

Credit: Facebook

It’s ironic, however, that people on Facebook chose to make fun of them for being on Facebook. Sure, it’s terrible timing, but it just seems like everyone is on social media at all hours of the day. This couple simply chose to do it at the most special time in their life! 

So back to our original question: When should a couple update their Facebook status from single to married?

Credit: @courtneygmiller / Twitter

Some people are simply too eager to let the world know they are officially married. It’s a big deal in life, and we suppose it is normal to want to show off and tell their Facebook friends how much they’ve grown up. 

So, it’s bad to change your status from single to married on the day after your wedding?

Credit: @QuestionaBulls / Twitter

People probably already know that you were going to get married anyway, right? So why not update your Facebook status and get it over with? What’s the harm in that? You know people who shame you for announcing to the world about big milestones are on their phones too, they’re just not telling you about their every move. 

To be honest, social media — especially on Facebook — is so intrusive about our life that it gives us all this pressure to update, and post, and overshare. 

Credit: @feliciathena / Twitter

This woman is correct, Facebook has no chill. They already know our every move thanks to algorithms so we just play along because they give us no choice. 

For those that are just too busy to update their status. 

Credit: @JANUARYDENIS1 / Twitter

The dumb thing about changing it later is that people are probably thinking, “yeah, we know you’re married.” 

When everyone and your kid knows you’re married, so you want to make it official like several years later. 

Credit: @hanelaineking / Twitter

This is kind of cute, especially if you have kids. 

Now, remember, if you are updating your Facebook friends about your personal business don’t forget you may have to also update them about the bad stuff too. 

Credit: @B_Worrell3 / Twitter

There’s nothing worse than changing your status from married to single for everyone to see. We can’t just share the good, we have to share the real stuff too, even if it hurts. Also, your friends are supposed to be there for you through the good and the bad, right? On Facebook though, it’s all pretty superficial so in the end, who cares what you post. It will just live on the internet forever. 

READ: This Latina Got A Text From Her Ex Right Before His Wedding Day And Twitter Is Wrecked

A 16-Year-Old Guatemalan Boy Died In Border Patrol Custody And Thanks To An Autopsy We Now Have More Details On Why

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A 16-Year-Old Guatemalan Boy Died In Border Patrol Custody And Thanks To An Autopsy We Now Have More Details On Why

In March, a 16-year-old Guatemalan boy died while at a South Texas Border Patrol station, and an autopsy report released on Wednesday is offering jarring new details around his passing.

The 16-year-old died in US custody but new details paint a troubling picture of his death.

Carlos Gregorio Hernandez Vasquez crossed the US-Mexico border near Weslaco, Texas by himself on May 13. The teen was taken to a processing center for unaccompanied minors in McAllen for six days. On May 19, after a nurse practitioner found that he had a 103-degree fever and tested positive for the flu, he was given Tamiflu and transferred to the Border Patrol station at Weslaco. The next morning, Hernandez Vasquez was dead.

His loss marked the fifth death of a migrant child in Border Patrol custody since December, prompting many questions from immigrant rights activists and community members. Now an autopsy report obtained by Texas Monthly is offering some answers. 

According to the account, the teen died of a flu that was complicated by pneumonia and sepsis. Dr. Norma Jean Farley, a contract forensic pathologist for Hidalgo County who conducted the autopsy, said a video captures the unpleasant final moments of his life. Hernandez Vasquez was fed at 2 a.m. on May 20, with agents checking in on him once an hour. Some time later (a concrete hour isn’t known because the timestamp on the video is incorrect, with no details in the report explaining the inaccuracy), the teen is seen lying on the floor, vomiting on the floor, and walks over to the commode, where he sits and later lies back and expires.”

Hernandez Vasquez’s body was found at 6 a.m. that morning. He was declared dead 12 minutes later.

Credit: @splcenter / Twitter

After news of his passing went viral, the agency’s acting commissioner, John Sanders, made a written statement. 

“The men and women of U.S. Customs and Border Protection are saddened by the tragic loss of this young man and our condolences are with his family,” he said, as reported by the Dallas News. “CBP is committed to the health, safety and humane treatment of those in our custody.”

However, in Hernandez Vasquez’s case, and that of several other detained ill children, Border Patrol did not follow protocol. The agency is required to transfer unaccompanied children to the Office of Refugee Resettlement within 72 hours, but they did not. Even more, despite his poor health, he was not taken to a hospital.

After mounting criticism, the teen’s death was put under review to determine why proper procedures were not followed.

Credit: @ErikaAndiola / Twitter

According to Dr. Jonathan Winickoff, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and MassGeneral Hospital for Children, it is “fairly rare” for children living in the United States to die from the flu. He told the Texas Monthly that about one out of 600,000 US children die of the sickness. However, out of 230,000 young people being held in Customs and Border Protection, three have died of the flu.

Dr. Judy Melinek, a veteran forensic pathologist who reviewed Hernandez’s autopsy, as well as the three other autopsies available for migrant children who died in custody, said the conditions in which detained children are kept leads to high health risk.

“Prolonged custody of mixed groups of migrants from different regions in close quarters increases the likelihood of transmission of respiratory pathogens such as influenza,” Melinek, a board-certified forensic pathologist in San Francisco and CEO of PathologyExpert Inc., told the paper.

As a result, she is calling for a “public health audit of the policies and conditions in these migrant camps and a forensic review of all migrant deaths.”

Up until December, a child hadn’t died in Border Patrol custody in a decade.

Credit: @UNITEDWEDREAM / Twitter

Curiously, each of the five unaccompanied minors who did pass on had initially been taken into custody by agents from the El Paso and the Rio Grande Valley sectors of the Border Patrol. 

Seven-year-old Jakelin Caal Maquin died in an El Paso hospital on Dec. 8. The late child, who had journeyed to the United States with her father, perished from a bacterial infection that spread to her bloodstream and caused multiple organ failure. Weeks later, on Christmas Eve, Felipe Gomez Alonzo, 8, died of influenza B and bacterial infection. This year, 16-year-old Juan DeLeon Gutierrez died at a Corpus Christi hospital on April 30 after getting sick at an Office of Refugee Resettlement shelter in Brownsville, Texas. A month later, on May 14, 2-year-old Josue Ramirez Vasquez died of “multiple intestinal and respiratory infectious diseases,” including influenza A.

On Wednesday, the House passed a bill that would institute basic standards of care for those in Border Patrol custody. H.R. 3239, which passed 233 to 195, aims to prevent the now-growing deaths of detained children by establishing standards of care that meet people’s humanitarian needs. 

Credit: @RepFletcher / Twitter

The measure proposes ensuring that everyone in Border Patrol custody has access to drinking water; private, clean and reliable toilets that include a proper waste disposal and a hand washing station; basic personal hygiene products; and receive the medically appropriate number of calories for age and weight to height ratio. It also requires facilities to maintain shelter and environmental standards, like minimum space requirements, specified temperature ranges and appropriate bedding, as well as provide adequate training to officers responsible for implementing the new stipulations.

“Today’s vote brings us closer than ever to preventing the deaths of children and restoring humanity to our treatment of children and families seeking asylum,” Rep. Raul Ruiz’s (D-CA) said.

Read: The New York Times Asked People To Share Stories Of Being Told To “Go Back” Where They Came From And My Heart Aches