Culture

If Your Kitchen Looks Like This, You Are Definitely Turning Into Your Abuela

Simplicity doesn’t exist when it comes to your abuela’s house. Every room in her house has personal touches that can’t go unnoticed. If you were to take a tour through your abuela’s kitchen, it would look a little like this…

Hands down, abuela’s kitchen has the most character. You know you’re in her kitchen because of the comal that is always on the stove.

CREDIT: @EMILYW725 / TWITTER

And it seems like the longer it stays out on the stove, the better the tortillas taste.

Her stove is never complete without layers and layers of aluminum placed under every burner.

CREDIT: VERONICA HERNANDEZ / FACEBOOK

The clean freak in her has to avoid the oil stains one way or another.

And because she’s more of a cook than a baker, this is what ends up happening to her oven:

CREDIT: SANTIOS G. MARTINEZ / FACEBOOK

She doesn’t need an oven when she has a stove. The oven then becomes the ultimate storage facility.

As for kitchen necessities, something she always has on the counter is her molcajete.

CREDIT: @YOMAN_JOSE / TWITTER

Homemade salsa and guacamole wouldn’t be same without this bad boy.

And right next to that, grandma always has this little salt shaker out on the table. But look closely. It isn’t abuela’s salt shaker without a few grains of rice.

CREDIT: CHRISTIAN SALAMANCA / FACEBOOK

It might seem strange, but the rice actually absorbs moisture helping the salt last longer and preventing it from clumping up over time. #AbuelaHacks

As for dinnerware, your abuela can never have enough of these classic, color-trimmed bowls:

CREDIT: BALTAZER CORNEJO LUJAN / FACEBOOK / @LA__CALAVERA / TWITTER

She has these on deck.

But if there’s one thing that adds color and character to your grandma’s kitchen, it’s her fancy curtains.

CREDIT: @ELASTURIANOMTY / @BELENCORTINAS01 / @TELASJUNCO / TWITTER

So. Much. Color.

Not a single wall in the kitchen is left plain. If it’s not one of these church or grocery store calendars that are pinned to the wall…

CREDIT: @CARLITOSVARGASP / @JOSE_NATIVO / TWITTER

And because abuela hates throwing things away, these accumulate year after year.

…Then it’s a painting of the Last Supper hanging on one of her walls. Or both.

CREDIT: JULIE BANHAM / FACEBOOK

It’s either this or a saint.

The only thing that completes her fruit themed decor is a bowl of fake fruit on the table.

CREDIT: @SPEND1DAYINMYSHOES / TUMBLR

To go with her fruit curtains and her fruit painting. So dangerous by the way. My cousin once choked on one of the plastic grapes.

But kitchen decor doesn’t stop there. Her oil and soap dispensers are dressed up in colorful lacy aprons.

CREDIT: SANDYLITTLECRAFTS / ETSY

They have different outfits for every season.

One thing everyone can appreciate about abuelita is how much of a pro she is when it comes to recycling.

CREDIT: SADIE WILBURN / FACEBOOK

She’s been using the same container for a decade.

And if there’s one thing you’re sure to find in your abuela’s cocina, it’s a stash of plastic grocery store bags somewhere in her cabinets.

CREDIT: @THEREALGABEC_ / TWITTER

Most grocery stores no longer distribute plastic bags, but that’s not an issue for your sweet abuelita.


READ: This Restaurant Hires Abuelitas Instead Of Chefs


What does your abuela’s kitchen look like? Let us know in the comments and hit the share button below!

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Watch This Video Called ‘Project Abuelita’ About COVID-19 and Try Not To Cry

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Watch This Video Called ‘Project Abuelita’ About COVID-19 and Try Not To Cry

Screenshot via YouTube

Slowly but surely, the COVID-19 pandemic is winding to a close. If you’ve been following the news closely, you know that the CDC has given the go-ahead for fully-vaccinated people to gather indoors without social-distancing or having to wear a mask.

This is especially good news to those of us who haven’t had close-contact with our family members in over a year.

Unfortunately, many Latinos are suspicious of the COVID-19 vaccine–especially the older, less-informed generation.

Luckily, the Ad Council has partnered with ad agency Pereira O’Dell to create a marketing campaign called “Project Abuelita”.

“Project Abuelita” is a campaign aimed at encouraging older Latinos to get vaccinated. The campaign is part of the Ad Council’s Vaccine Education Initiative. And as a side note, we dare you to watch the minute-long video and try not to cry.

The video shows an abuela cleaning her home and getting dressed. She has knick-knacks and sentimental mementos around her house, like kids’ drawings and family photos. The doorbell rings and the abuela greets her daughter and two grandchildren.

The children, visibly excited to see their abuelita, hesitate to touch her. But after their mother gives them the go-ahead, they rush into her arms. The abuela looks overcome with emotion as she is finally able to hug her grandchildren for the first time in ages.

Despite COVID-19 hitting the Latino community particularly hard this past year, Latinos remain skeptical about the safety of the new vaccine.

According to a poll conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation, only 26% Latinos said they would get the vaccine as soon as possible, compared to 40% of white people. 43% of Latinos said they would “wait and see”.

Latinos aren’t skeptical of the COVID-19 vaccine for no reason. There are multiple historical incidents where the U.S. government has exploited people of color and Latinos in the name of “health”. Like when U.S. Public Health service purposefully exposed unknowing Guatemalan prisoners to syphilis in order to record its symptoms. And unfortunately, there are many other examples.

But the COVID-19 vaccines are nothing to be afraid of. Scientific consensus is that the vaccines are safe. Not only that, but getting vaccinated will help us get back to our normal lives.

The “Project Abuelita” video is for a free service of the same name that the Kern County Latino COVID-19 Task Force launched.

According to a press release, the service will utilize bilingual volunteers to reach out to the elderly, monolingual Latino population to help with vaccination efforts. The volunteers will schedule testing, vaccination appointments and follow-up appointments.

As Jay Tamsi, co-founder of the Kern County Latino COVID 19 Task Force says: “Our abuelitos need us more so now than ever in setting up their vaccination appointments solving transportation issues, and helping them make sense of our changing ways.”

Find out more about Project Abuelita here.

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Chingona 105-Year-Old Abuela Says She Survived Spanish Flu, 3 Husbands, And COVID-19 By Eating Gin-Soaked Raisins

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Chingona 105-Year-Old Abuela Says She Survived Spanish Flu, 3 Husbands, And COVID-19 By Eating Gin-Soaked Raisins

For Lucia DeClerck, nine gin-soaked raisins have kept doctors and pandemics away. The grandmother of 11 great-great-grandchildren celebrated her 105th birthday on January 25 in Mystic Meadows Rehab and Nursing Center in Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey.

That same day she was diagnosed with Covid-19.

Staff members at her nursing center say DeClerck was pretty much asymptomatic and was in the facility’s COVID-19 unit for 14 days.

Now a COVID-19 survivor, DeClerck is the oldest person at her nursing home, according to The New York Times, and has survived two pandemics. DeClerck was born in 1916 in Hawaii to parents who came from Guatemala and Spain. She was two years old and living in Hawaii when the Spanish flu broke out. Since that time, she has survived two world wars, survived three husbands, and one out of her three sons. 

“She’s just been open with everything in life and I think that has really helped her because she hasn’t hesitated to do whatever she’s wanted to do,” DeClerck’s son, Henry Laws III, told CBS Philly in an interview.

Speaking about her secret to longevity, DeClerck says it takes equal parts belief and diet.

“Pray, pray, pray. And don’t eat junk food,” she told the New York Times before going on to explain that the nine gin-soaked golden raisins she eats every morning might have helped in her survival.

According to DeClerck she has eaten the special recipe every morning for most of her life.

“Fill a jar,” she explained giving NYT her recipe. “Nine raisins a day after it sits for nine days.” The New York Times describes her diet as being a part of a ritual that her children and grandchildren chalk up to being just one in the entirety of “endearing lifelong habits, like drinking aloe juice straight from the container and brushing her teeth with baking soda. (That worked, too: She did not have a cavity until she was 99, relatives said.)”

“She is just the epitome of perseverance,” DeClerck’s 53-year-old granddaughter, Shawn Laws O’Neil explained. “Her mind is so sharp. She will remember things when I was a kid that I don’t even remember.”

Ms. DeClerck, tested positive for the virus on her 105th birthday, just one day after she had gotten her second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

“At first, she said she was scared. She did not like being isolated, and she missed the daily chatter from the parade of caregivers at Mystic Meadows Rehabilitation and Nursing, a 120-bed facility in Little Egg Harbor,” reports the New York Times. “Within two weeks she was back in her room, holding her rosary beads and wearing her trademark sunglasses and knit hat.”

According to O’Neil, DeClerck has a new nickname amongst her two surviving sons, five grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, and 11 great-great-grandchildren: “The 105-year-old badass who kicked Covid.”

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