Culture

It’s Día De Los Muertos. Take This Quiz To Show How Much You Know About The Popular Holiday

For decades, Día de los Muertos (also known as Day of the Dead) was mostly celebrated in Mexico, but in recent years, it has gained popularity in the United States. Now, you’re likely to see references to the holiday in movies or see Día de los Muertos items for sale at your local store. But the holiday, which celebrates the lives those who have passed away, is more than just sugar skulls and face paint.

Take this quiz to find out how much you really know about Día de los Muertos.


IMAGE CREDITS: Ray Bouknight / Flickr, Jen Wilton / Flickr, p0ptie / Flickr


READ: This Día De Los Muertos, Let’s Honor Those Who Died Looking For The American Dream


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A Paragliding Santa From California Got Entangled In Power Lines

Things That Matter

A Paragliding Santa From California Got Entangled In Power Lines

Ho ho… whoa.

It’s the holiday season and as we all know this compacted with the singularity of 2020, guarantees a winter full of the bizarre. Previous incidents have made Santas stuck in chimneys and elves thieving a sort of holiday norm. Just when we thought nothing could really shock us, a recent story out of Rio Linda, California is shaking up the holiday weirds.

On Sunday, the power lines of Rio Linda, California received a particular shock when a paraglider dressed as Santa Claus fell crashed right into them.

The Santa was spotted being stuck in the power lines for over an hour on Sunday before he was safely removed.

According to the Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, the Santa Clause was released from the power lines after being trapped for over an hour. CBS Sacramento reported that a woman by the name of Alisa Cumbra learned bout the incident after her son recorded the crash. Cumbra told CBS she didn’t know what to believe.

“I’m like, is he okay? Did he get electrocuted? What’s going on?” Cumbra explained.

Neighbors told outlets that they’ve heard the pilot in the skies in the area before. “We see him flying around all of the time. It’s like some kind of go-kart with a parachute on top of it,” a woman named Crystal Kennedy, who lives near the crash site explained.

“He did it. He went ahead and did it. He hit the power line,” a woman named Angela, who claimed to be the pilot’s friend told CBS.

According to friends of the flying Santa, the pilot just wanted to spread some holiday cheer.

“He was just flying over here to drop off some candy canes for the kids. And, that’s when he experienced engine problems,” Kennedy explained.

According to the fire department, there were no conductions from the lines occurring at the time. “The pilot had a mishap. He was actually out doing something, really good for the community, and in 2020 I think it’s something we all need,” Cpt. Chris Vestal said.

“We are happy to report #Santa is uninjured and will be ready for #Christmas next week, but perhaps with a new sleigh!” the fire department wrote.

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Here Are Some Christmas Traditions From Around Latin America

Culture

Here Are Some Christmas Traditions From Around Latin America

Christmas is a special time of year. Families have their traditions to mark the festive year and some of those traditions are rooted in culture. Here are some of the ways various countries in Latin America celebrate Christmas.

El Pase Del Niño Viajero – Ecuador

El Pase del Niño Viajero is a pageant that happens in Ecuador that lasts weeks. The parade is meant to represent the journey of Mary and Joseph. The parade highlights the religious importance of Christmas in Ecuador and is most common in the Andean region of the country.

The biggest and most important parade is in Cuenca, a deeply religious city. Citizens near the city have all day to see the parade as it starts in the early morning and runs through the late afternoon. This gives people a lot of time to make it to the city to witness the parade.

La Gritería – Nicaragua

La Gritería comes after La Purisma. La Purisma is celebrated at the end of November and is meant to celebrate the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary. La Gritería is celebrated in early December and involves literal yelling. Someone would shout “Que causa tanta alegria?” (“What causes so much happiness?”) People respond “La Concepción de María.” (“Mary’s Conception.”)

Las Posadas – Mexico

Mexican posadas are the most recognizable. Posadas take place in Mexico from Dec. 16-24, though this year they are most likely to be virtual. The posada begins with a procession in the neighborhood filled with people singing and sometimes led by two people dressed as Mary and Joseph.

Another part is the posada party. Before guests can enter, there is a song exchange with the people outside playing Joseph looking for shelter. The hosts sing the side of the innkeeper saying there is no room. Eventually, the guests are welcomed into the home to celebrate Christmas.

Aguinaldos – Colombia

Aguinaldos are a series of games played by people in Colombia leading up to Christmas. There are certain games that are common among people in Colombia. One is pajita en boca, which requires holding a straw in your mouth the entire time of a social event. Another is dar y no recibir, which is about getting people to take something you are giving to score a point.

El Quema Del Diablo – Guatemala

El quema del diablo is celebrated in early December and is a way of letting go of the previous year. People burn piñatas and effigies of the devil to let go of all negative feelings and moments from the previous year. If there was every to try a new tradition, this would be the year. Burn an effigy and banish 2020 to the past, where it belongs.

READ: These Seriously Sad Christmas Presents Were Worse Than Actual Coal

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