Culture

Puerto Rican Astros Player Held Up The Flag And Repped Hard For Both Of Their Hurricane Battered Homes

With record breaking hurricanes on both ends of their minds, Astros players of Puerto Rican descent were understandably emotional after their World Series win on Wednesday. With tears in their eyes, Boricua Astros team members Carlos Correa, Carlos Beltrán, Juan Centeno, Alex Cintrón and coach Alex Cora held out the flag taut while someone off camera screamed “Puerto Rico!” at the tops of their lungs.

Puerto Rico suffered one of the worst hurricanes in its recorded history, with many still without power, and most unable to see the show put on in the World Series, where 12 out of 15 of the home runs were hit by a Latino player.

After game seven of the World Series, this emotional scene played out.

Shortstop Carlos Correa dropped to his knees after the Astros victory and proudly stretched out his Puerto Rican flag.

It wasn’t the only time he dropped to his knees, as he later got down on one to propose to his girlfriend.

The win was a point of pride for Venezuelans, who have suffered from food shortages, as well as Dominicans and Cubans — both islands suffered the wrath of hurricanes this season, too.

Another point of pride for many was watching Panamanian-Puerto Rican right fielder George Springer, who set World Series records and won the first World Series MVP award for the Astros.

And with home runs like this one it’s no surprise he earned the prestigious award.

Although not born in Puerto Rico, Springer had this to say in an ESPN interview about the island.

I am extremely proud to be Puerto Rican. My family goes back to a long time from there. I might not be born there, but my mom was and I still go back. It’s been hard [after the hurricane] to not be in contact with any of her family members, but the last few days have been better. She’s actually been able to get a hold of a couple of people, like her cousins and all that stuff. It’s sad to see my mother struggling because our family, she doesn’t have any updates. That island is going through a terrible tragedy with no power, there isn’t a lot of water for people, and I feel for that place.

To get a ring for Puerto Rico [would] be special for all the guys that are from the island. I am not from there, but I [can] relate to it, and to get some people just a momentary lapse from what is happening will be huge. Whoever wins, there’s a ring that’s going to go back to that island. I am happy to be a part of it.

Not just a baseball MVP, but clearly a human being MVP.


[H/T] NBC News

READ: After Winning The World Series, Carlos Correa Proposed To His Girlfriend On Live TV


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Puerto Rico Has Declared A State Of Emergency And Left Residents Without Access To Running Water

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Puerto Rico Has Declared A State Of Emergency And Left Residents Without Access To Running Water

Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Another crisis is unfolding on the island of Puerto Rico, as a severe drought grips the territory and forces the government to take drastic measures. After a series of major earthquakes and hurricanes, Puerto Rico is now suffering through one of its worst droughts in history.

Water is scarce. And the government is implementing rationing measures that will leave hundreds of thousands of residents without regular access to running water.

Gov. Wanda Vazquez has announced a state of emergency as the government begins rationing water.

Puerto Rico is once again in the headlines for an ongoing crisis that is affecting hundreds of thousands of island residents. On Monday, Puerto Rico’s governor declared a state of emergency as a worsening drought creeps across the territory.

Starting July 2, nearly 140,000 customers, including some in the capital of San Juan, will be without water for 24 hours every other day as part of strict rationing measures. Puerto Rico’s utilities company urged people to not excessively stockpile water because it would worsen the situation, and officials asked that everyone use masks and maintain social distancing if they seek water from one of 23 water trucks set up across the island.

“We’re asking people to please use moderation,” said Doriel Pagán, executive director of Puerto Rico’s Water and Sewer Authority, adding that she could not say how long the rationing measures will last.

The order signed also prohibits certain activities in most municipalities including watering gardens during daylight hours, filling pools and using a hose or non-recycled water to wash cars. Those caught face fines ranging from $250 for residents to $2,500 for industries for a first violation.

Puerto Rico is experiencing a drought ranging from moderate to severe in some parts of the territory.

Credit: Joe Raedle / Getty Images

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, as of last week more than 26% of the island is experiencing a severe drought and another 60% is under a moderate drought. Water rationing measures affecting more than 16,000 clients were imposed this month in some communities in the island’s northeast region.

The island’s access to water is complicated by the fact that many residents rely on a system of reservoirs in Puerto Rico for water. However, due to budget constraints, several have not been dredged for years, leaving sediment to collect and allowing the excess loss of water. 

Aside from drought, the island is still recovering from a pair of deadly earthquakes and Hurricane Maria.

Credit: Eric Rojas / Getty Images

Over the last few years, Puerto Rico has suffered a one-two punch that has left much of the island’s infrastructure in shambles. In fact, Vasquez cited the lasting impacts of the December and January earthquakes and the coronavirus pandemic as exacerbating the water crisis.

The current water crisis has threatened the safety and wellbeing of Puerto Ricans. The earthquakes also disproportionately impacted the southern region where the drought is most severe. Vázquez also extended the coronavirus curfew for the whole island, which began in March, for three more weeks, making it the longest continuous curfew in the United States so far.

People Are Using Social Media to Highlight Racism On The Islands

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People Are Using Social Media to Highlight Racism On The Islands

Joe Raedle / Getty Images

The world is paying attention to racism in the world right now. The Black Lives Matter movement has gone international and people are starting to call out racism everywhere they see it. This means shining a light on racism on social media to really highlight the issue.

Afro-Caribbean people are using #AquíNoExisteElRacismoPero and #PeroNoSomosRacists to highlight racism.

Social media users are sharing their experiences with racism on the Caribbean islands and the hashtags speak volumes. The hashtags translate to #ButWeAreNotRacists and #ThereIsNoRacismHereBut are being used to highlight racism in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.

There is an understood in the Latino community that racism runs deep but it is often ignored. Culturally, it has plagued the Latino community for generations with microaggressions about hair and “bettering the race.” It is something that we need to address and these hashtags are calling it out.

Some Dominicans are highlighting the microaggressions that have existed for as long as time.

Microaggressions are some of the most common and annoying moments of racism around. They are little but when there are enough they really add up fast. They are all around and are said so often that people often ignore them when they are said. “Pelo malo” one of the most common examples of racist microaggressions in the Latino community. It is always Afro-Latinos who have “pelo malo.”

The hair microaggressions are some of the earliest.

Twitter users are coming forward with stories of having their hair relaxed and chemically treated to be “better.” The focus on Euro-centric beauty within the Afro-Latino community is toxic and instilling it in children so young is a traumatic and hurtful experience.

Some people have been able to use the experience to empower themselves.

People who can take a moment like this ad grow from it are the kind of people you want to know. You go with your self-acceptance and love. There is nothing more beautiful than being yourself and learning to love all of you is a journey so many have to make.

There are so many microaggressions that have become far to familiar in our community and we have to fight against them.

Cosas que escuché en mi entorno mientras crecía :"En nuestra familia no hay negros""Mijito tienes que mejorar la raza…

Posted by Stefano Navarro on Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Things I heard in my surroundings growing up:
“There are no black in our family.”
“Mijito you have to improve the race.”
“Marry a white girl.”
“You’re not black, you’re tricky, don’t say that again.”
“I’m not black, I’m brunette.”
“You mean the black I was selling….”
“You work like black.”
“You sweat like black.”
“Your kids came out happily white.”
“You smell like black.”
#PeroNoSomosRacistas

READ: 8 Racist Habits Latinos Seriously Need To Drop