Culture

Here Are 12 Of The Most Toxic Tourist Types Who Make Traveling A Trying Experience, Are You One?

With summer almost here, many of us will be taking summer vacations all around the world.

But there’s a right way and a wrong way to travel. You don’t want to be one of those toxic tourists that thinks they’re too good to connect with the locals, or has to take a selfie in a place they probably shouldn’t be.

Here are 12 toxic tourist types to avoid being on your next trip.

The Always Late

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While most of us try to arrive early for our flights, The Always Late couldn’t care less when he hears his name during the final boarding call for passengers. He’s used to it. It takes him at least an hour to get ready, and he never rushes anywhere.

He manages to always jeopardize his tour groups by unfailingly arriving later than the call times – and he’s never sorry. It’s as if time, for him, is a social construct that doesn’t matter. Well, it does. At least to those around him.

The Foodie

Credit: Reddit

You eat anything and everything. Trying the local cuisine is a big part of your travel experience. If the locals eat with chopsticks, you’ll eat with chopsticks. If they eat from a leaf, you’ll eat from a leaf. You’d really rather not eat food that you can find at home while you’re on holiday. You’re game to try everything once, even if it’s too “exotic” for most people’s tastes…

Tourists Who Wear “I ♥ ____” Shirts

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Our city does not ♥ you.

The Control Freak

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At the airport, The Control Freak won’t let you hold your own documents. She constantly forgets she isn’t your mother. You love her at the planning stage, when she schedules your itineraries to the T… until she freaks out when something doesn’t go as planned. When the weather forecast isn’t accurate, she’ll throw a fit.

The Lost One

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You have a map, but you’re still lost. You never know exactly which bus to take… is it supposed to be Bus No. 12, or Bus No. 12A? So you scan the crowd and look for the person who looks the most knowledgeable and approach them to ask for directions. It turns out that you’re supposed to take Bus No. 12.

When it arrives, you ask the driver if you’re on the right bus. He tells you that you are, so you happily take a seat and try to follow the bus journey on your map. Of course, you still end up getting off a few stops early, or a stop too late.

The Cheapskate

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The cheapskate owns his/her label as the budget traveler. But sometimes, it gets a bit overboard. They constantly ask you to treat them. They never leave a tip, even in destinations where tips are expected. They’ll even hold their pee when they can’t find a free public bathroom!

We all love practical travelers, but if you’re with someone who refuses to pay for anything, you might miss out on several experiences.

The Tablet-Lover

Credit: @travelfails101 / Twitter

Becasue like when ever was an iPad a convenient tool to take photos…

The Environment Destroyer

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“We’re all going to die someday,” Environment Destroyer says to justify their wasteful acts towards the environment. They leave the air conditioning and lights on all day, all night, uses straw after straw, plastic cup after plastic cup, stirrer after stirrer. ‘No littering’ may just be the hardest ordinance for Environment Destroyer to follow, because leaving trash behind has become a habit.

The Tourist Hater

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Tourist Hater claims to be a traveler — not a tourist because the term “tourist” is offensive. They look down on people who enjoy tourist destinations and believe that once a spot is geo-tagged, it’s automatically mainstream. They only enjoy underrated places, and only secretly takes photos of cool things. You’ll never spot Tourist Hater having too much fun.

The World Traveler

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The World Traveller has been everywhere, and s/he makes sure everyone knows about it. If you’re planning on traveling somewhere, they’ll instantly have a list of dos and don’ts for you. While you appreciate the occasional tips, you can’t help but feel like World Traveller is just “helping you out” to brag about his experiences. How do you know? They think they have the best ideas ever, and other opinions are invalid!

The Stop-And-Stare Tourist

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Tourists who stop in the middle of the sidewalk and stare up at buildings. Tourists who stop in the middle of a cross-walk and stare at their maps. Tourists who stop and stare the top of an escalator, wreaking havoc on all those behind them. Dude, just walk.

The Selfie King/Queen

Credit: Reddit

You were one of the first people to buy a selfie stick, and you never travel without it. You’re in over half of all the photos you take. You’ve taken photos of your feet as you stand on the edge of a cliff, your legs as you’re lying by the pool, your hand holding an umbrella drink or an ice cream cone, your face against a beautiful background, your back silhouetted against the setting sun… etc.

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There’s A Mysterious “Bat Cave” Full Of Blind Snakes Near Cancun And It’s Creepy AF

Things That Matter

There’s A Mysterious “Bat Cave” Full Of Blind Snakes Near Cancun And It’s Creepy AF

Mexico is full of incredible natural beauty, so it’s no wonder that it’s frequently one of the world’s most visited destinations. People love to visit the picturesque beaches, the ancient ruins, lively cities, and relaxed pueblos. But we would imagine that few people would add this mysterious ‘bat cave’ to their list of destinations, considering it’s full of blind snakes that hang from the ceiling to catch their prey. 

Mexico’s mysterious ‘bat cave’ is part of a truly unique ecosystem. 

Cancun is one of Mexico’s most popular tourist attractions. It’s home to some of the world’s greatest beaches and tons of adventure at cenotes and Mayan ruins. But, apparently, it’s also home to a unique ecosystem that includes a so-called bat cave home to thousands of blind snakes that hang upside down. Yikes!

The cave, located less than 180 miles from Cancun’s spectacular beaches, is home to a species of blind, deaf snakes that feed mainly on flying bats.”This is the only place in the world where this happens,” Arturo Enrique Bayona Miramontes, the biologist who discovered it, told Newsweek.

The cave system remained completely unknown to tourists and surprised many scientists, who marveled as the jungle was peeled away to reveal another species, another hidden natural world.

The “cave of the hanging snakes” has a 65-foot wide mouth from which thousands of bats of seven different species swarm out every night, seeking food in and around Lake Chichancanab, some 2 miles away. When the bats return from nighttime feeding, some become food for the snakes.

The cave is a bat paradise – unless they become food for the blind and deaf snakes.

The giant cave is home to hundreds of thousands – perhaps even millions – of bats who cling to the cave’s roof. Joining them in the cave are a unique species of blind and deaf snakes that strike unsuspecting bats as they fly by.

The technique of the yellow-red rat snake is frighteningly precise, Bayona Miramontes said. “These snakes do not see or hear, but they can feel the vibrations of the bats flying, and they use that opportunity to hunt them with their body, suffocating their victims before gobbling them down.”

If you’re feeling adventurous, the cave is open to a limited number of visitors.

The cave is located nearby a very small Mayan community in Kantemó, on the Yucatan peninsula. Although the village is so small that it only has one church, the community has been working hard to protect this unique ecosystem.

Only 10 visitors are allowed inside the cave at a time and no photography is permitted. Since the pandemic began, the cave has been closed but it will reopen when the health department of the Mexican state of Quintana Roo allows tourism again.

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Mexico Is Owning The Instagram-Worthy World Of Glamping With These Bubble Hotels

Culture

Mexico Is Owning The Instagram-Worthy World Of Glamping With These Bubble Hotels

Right now just about everyone is itching to go on vacation. But considering that we’re still mid-pandemic and the call remains to socially distance, what can one do?

Sure, glamping is nothing new – it’s filled our Instagram feeds for years and was around long before that – but it may just provide travelers with that socially-distanced staycation that so many of us need right about now. Or, better yet, wait a little while longer and get yourself to Mexico where several new glamping bubble hotels are popping up.

Mexico will soon have three “bubble hotel” options for tourists looking for the next level of “glamping.”

When you think of camping, many of us think of bugs, not showering, and doing our private business behind a bush somewhere. While that’s still definitely an option for those of us that are into it, glamping has been a trend towards making the camping experience a more comfortable one.

Glamping has been gaining popularity among nature lovers, who also want to enjoy those everyday creature comforts, but in the midst of beautiful landscapes. That’s why bubble hotels have been popping up across Mexico, to offer clients a unique stay, close to nature they’re the perfect ‘getaway’ to get out of your daily routine.

From the bosque outside Mexico City to the deserts of Baja, Mexico is a glamping paradise. 

These bubble hotels have rooms described by travel guidebook publisher Lonely Planet as essentially inflatable, transparent domes designed to allow guests to cocoon themselves in nature without quite leaving their material comforts behind. 

There are already two such properties across Mexico with a third which will begin welcoming guests sometime toward the end of this year.

One of those that is already operational is Alpino Bubble Glamping in Mexico City while the other is the Campera Bubble Hotel in the Valle de Guadalupe wine region of Baja California.

Located in the Cumbres de Ajusco National Park in the south of the capital, the former has just two “bubbles,” a 40-square-meter deluxe one that goes for 4,500 pesos (about US $220) a night and a 25-square-meter standard where a stay costs a slightly more affordable 4,000 pesos.

Both have views of the Pico del Águila, the highest point of the Ajusco, or Xitle, volcano, and come equipped with telescopes that guests can use to get a better view of the surrounding scenery and night sky.

Bubble glamping isn’t the camping our parents dragged us out to do in the woods as kids.

Credit: Alpino Bubble Hotel

Sure you may be connecting with nature and enjoying awesome activities like horseback riding, stargazing, hiking or rafting, but these properties come with all the creature comforts we’re used to. 

Move nights, wifi, breakfast in bed, warm showers, luxurious bedding, and even a full bar are all standard amenities at many of these properties.

What do you think? Would you be up to stay the night at one of these bubble hotels?

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