Culture

This Woman Confused By How A Teen Is Expected To Get Dolled Up For Her Quince, But Not Allowed To Have A BF Is All Of Us

“I’m 29 years old and without fail…”

“The Pineapple Diaries” is giving voice and representation of Afro-Latinas who are just trying to navigate the complicated and double sided swards of their identity. On the second episode of the first season, character Maite Lopez gives a powerful monologue about finding a balance while juggling her Latino, American, and black identities. From her mother constantly asking her when she is getting married and giving her grandchildren to not fitting in with the entire Latino or African-American communities, Lopez is constantly pulled in different directions. She even discusses the confusing narrative brought on by having a quince and how a girl is expected to dress up as a woman and present herself as a woman but still not being allowed to have a boyfriend because of strict traditions and rules. But, in the end, she knows that everything is going to be okay.

“I found my identity in the confusion. The confusion, it is my identity; my beautiful and mixed up reality,” Lopez says. “I found my identity in my broken Spanish, in my gorgeous skin, in the way I wear my hair, in the palm trees on the island. Waiting for the orange line on a cold winter night and cooking locrio and wearing my African head wrap and anything and everything that confuses you. I found my identity in the traditions of my history and in the doors that have been opened wide for me as a modern woman in this world. I’m going to be okay, because I am, right now, right before your eyes, everything I am.”


READ: A Latina Photographer Recreated 6 Iconic Afro-Latina Portraits And The Results Are Stunning

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This Anglo Family Posed the Question: ‘Can We Check ‘Hispanic’ On Our Son’s College Applications Because His Egg Donor is Latino?’

Things That Matter

This Anglo Family Posed the Question: ‘Can We Check ‘Hispanic’ On Our Son’s College Applications Because His Egg Donor is Latino?’

via Christian Glatz/Public Domain

Earlier this month, The New York Times published an advice article that posed an interesting question: What constitutes a Latino identity?

The question stemmed from another question that some parents posed to the Times ethics expert: “My child’s egg donor is Latin American. Does that make him Latino?”

The question was:

“I am the parent of a child who was conceived via in vitro fertilization and surrogacy using the sperm of a Caucasian man and a donor egg from someone who is half Colombian and half Central American. My spouse and I are professionals and both Caucasian, so (knock on wood) our son will most likely not encounter financial hardships. May we in good conscience check ‘Latino/Hispanic’ on his college application? We don’t need to decide this for many years, but it has been a topic of discussion, and we would love to hear your reasoning.”

The question is a complicated one. And in this case, there may be no right or wrong answers. The Times‘ ethics expert, Kwame Anthony Appiah, shares his opinion that there are many factors that constitute a Latino identity.

“Being Latino, clearly, is not a matter of genetics,” said Appiah. “It’s a matter both of how you identify yourself and of how others identify you.”

And yes, we would think anyone would agree with that. Latinos come in all shades, races, religions, and regions. But these unnamed parents’ question sparks a larger question: is a Latino identity born into, or is constructed?

Appiah continues: “Your son may or may not identify as Hispanic/Latino when the time comes, depending on a host of factors, from peer groups to pigmentation. If he does, it won’t be wrong to say so.”

Appiah points out that these parents are already thinking about how they can use their child’s identity to their advantage.

Reading this advice column, you can’t help but feel a little uncomfortable. These non-Latino, Anglo parents are already thinking of their Latino child’s college application advantages. And the child isn’t even born yet.

As these unnamed parents say, they are both “professionals” and Caucasian. They think their child “will most likely not encounter financial hardships” like many people of color do.

“You’re presumably thinking that, in college applications, being identified as Hispanic/Latino will give him some advantage,” wrote Appiah, “and that if he hasn’t experienced discrimination or borne the burdens of the identity…this might be unfair.”

He continued: “In that situation, he’d certainly be getting advantages designed for people with a different set of experiences than his. Deliberately engineering such an outcome would be wrong.”

Twitter user seemed to be divided on the question. One Twitter user wrote: “Your child is therefore half Hispanic.. why would you deny them half their heritage? That’s the real question…”.

Another, seemingly frustrated with the parents, wrote: “It’s probably a good idea to ask important questions that will affect your child’s sense of identity BEFORE deciding to proceed with egg donation.”

One thing’s for certain: questions like this are going become more and more common as genetic technology continues to both advance and become more commonly used.

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J Balvin Gets Hot As He Chows Down On Fiery Hot Wings And Spills The Tea On All Things Balvin

Entertainment

J Balvin Gets Hot As He Chows Down On Fiery Hot Wings And Spills The Tea On All Things Balvin

The Prince of Reggaeton and one of the world’s most-streamed artists on both Spotify and YouTube joined the host of First We Feast for a little dish session on all things Balvin. Aside from the joys of watching Balvin devour entirely too spicy foods and salsas, we learn so much about the Colombian artist – and get to meet his dog Enzo.

J Balvin devours spicy AF wings and spills some tea in a new episode of First We Feast. 

Balvin shares how he used to be his own manager and even pretended that he was a totally separate person from J Balvin – Jose. In conversations with record labels and radio stations, he’d hype up J Balvin (as any good manager should do) and would tell those interested in booking the artist that he’d have to check in with him and make sure that his schedule would allow it. 

We learn tons of new things about the Prince of Reggaeton. 

Like apparently his first stage name was nearly Scotch Bonnet, which is a pretty amazing revelation considering it comes during a segment while he piles some Scotch Bonnet hot sauce on chicken. For those of you who don’t know, Scotch Bonnets are one of the world’s hottest chili peppers. Balvin says that his friend, rapper Fat Al, said that he should have a spicy name but Scotch Bonnet never stuck. 

And he shares why he thinks that reggaeton is outpacing the rest of the music industry.

J Balvin credits the meteoric rise of reggaeton thanks to its feel good vibes and its emotional value. He loves to make people vibe and feel something with his music.  He also gives credit where credit is due, pointing out how there are so many artists before him who have paved the way for his success.

Check out the full video here on YouTube.

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