Culture

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Is Just One Strong Latina Making Waves On Twitter

Twitter is an effective platform for expressing viewpoints and spreading the word about important issues in small, poignant sentences. We’ve seen many Latinos use the platform to get the word out about strikes, marches, and important legislation impacting their community. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is one of the most notable Latinas to use the platform to engage her audience around important issues. Here are some Latinas who are using Twitter to fight the good fight in the name of feminism.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Credit: @AOC / Twitter

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, also known as AOC, gained notoriety when she achieved the office of U.S. Representative for New York’s 14th congressional district. She made history by becoming the youngest woman ever to serve in the United States Congress at 29 years old. AOC is a member of the Democratic Socialists of America and a strong proponent of women’s rights as human rights.

Jessica Marie Garcia

Credit: @JessMarieGarcia / Twitter

Jessica Marie Garcia is a talented actress who has appeared in the popular Disney Channel original series, “Liv and Maddie” as Willow. She has also been featured in the television show, “The Middle”, and Netflix series, “On My Block.” Garcia embraces her curvaceous figure although her weight has been an obstacle for attaining certain acting roles and she has struggled with diabetes. She strives toward eating a nutritious diet and living a healthy lifestyle.

Sara Inés Calderón

Credit: @SaraChicaD / Twitter

Sara Inés Calderón is a multi-talented app developer, writer, and speaker. She has shared her expertise as a software engineer as a contributor for Vice and TechCrunch. She is a supporter of diversity in technology, serving as co-director of Women Who Code, Austin, and co-founder of the Austin Diversity Hackathon. Inés Calderón also provides her talents to the Austin music startup, musx, as a lead mobile developer.

Kristina Pérez

Credit: @kkperezbooks / Twitter

Kristina Pérez is a writer and scholar who has a Ph.D. in Medieval Literature from the University of Cambridge. She has lectured at the National University of Singapore and the University of Hong Kong. Pérez has written non-fiction and fiction books for both adults and young adults. She incorporates mythology, magic, fantasy, and science into her writing.

Cassandra Alicia

Credit: @gringatears / Twitter

Cassandra Alicia is the founder of popular social justice pages on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Most notably, the Latinx feminist social media page Xicanisma on Instagram. She is outspoken about Chicano politics and Chicana feminism. She encourages conversations about controversial topics such as homophobia, misogyny, and xenophobia.

Patricia Valoy

Credit: @PatriciaValoy / Twitter

Patricia Valoy is an advocate for women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). She is an engineer, writer, and speaker who discusses issues within the Latino community, such as racism and immigration. She focuses on the topic of women of color in male-dominated careers. Patricia works toward maintaining women in STEM without the hardships of sexism and discrimination. She shares her personal experiences in a STEM field as a source of inspiration.

Andreia Barcellos

Credit: @Andreia_Barcel / Twitter

Andreia Barcellos is a human rights advocate who believes migrant rights are human rights. She holds the esteemed position of Secretariat of Development and Social Welfare in Medianeira, Brazil for American University. Her research on Haitian immigration to Brazil provides support for increased training of government officials to reduce hardships facing migrants. Andreia’s public policy proposals have provided valuable guidance for changes in the city of Medianeira.

Xochitl Alvizo

Credit: @XochitlAlvizo / Twitter

Xochitl Alvizo is a co-founder of the Feminism and Religion project and website. She holds a Ph.D. in Practical Theology from Boston University School of Theology. She serves as Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at California State University, Northridge. Xochitl’s research encompasses feminist theology, feminist ecclesiology, and postmodern forms of church. Her lectures focus on the areas of women and religion, LGBTQ+, the philosophy of gender, sex, and sexuality.

Jen Brown

Credit: @The_JenBrown / Twitter

Jen Brown is an actress with a focus on voice acting who has also contributed as a director, sound designer, and costume designer. She considers herself an ethnically ambiguous Latina. She is a host of the feminist horror podcast, “Women in Caskets” and a Twitch game stream, JenBrownPlays. She was a founding member of The Vestige Group theatre company in Austin, Texas. Jen has also appeared in a variety of shows created by Rooster Teeth Productions.

Ellie Francis Douglass

Credit: @elliefdouglass / Twitter

Ellie Francis Douglass is an accomplished writer who has taught English Composition and Introductory Poetry Writing at her alma mater, Oregon State University, from which she holds an M.F.A. in Creative Writing. Ellie has had her poems published in the Missouri Review Online and “Sweet: A Literary Confection.” She contributes to Carve Magazine as Poetry Editor. Ellie shares her knowledge by teaching at Northwest Vista College and via the Gemini Ink’s Writers in Communities program.

Florencia Manóvil

Credit: @MichelleA.Dowell-Vest / YouTube

Florencia Manóvil is the owner of Mynah Films and has won the prestigious title of Best Filmmaker of the East Bay. She produces films that cover a diverse range of experiences including her feminist and queer viewpoints. Florencia’s film, “Fiona’s Script” won a Best Supporting Actress nomination at MethodFest. Her writing and directing talents gained her funding from the Frameline Completion Fund for her film, “Encuentro.” She continues to create groundbreaking works that encompass unique topics, such as the struggles of queer women who engage in esoteric practices as a means of survival in a patriarchal society.

Rosalie Morales Kearns

Credit: @JaneFriedman / Twitter

Rosalie Morales Kearns is a writer with a background in copyediting and book publicity. She possesses an M.F.A. in Creative Writing and has taught the subject at the University of Illinois and the State University of New York at Albany. She has written feminist literature including, “Kingdom of Women,” “The Female Complaint: Tales of Unruly Women,” and “Virgins and Tricksters.” Rosalie supports other female writers through her feminist publishing house, Shade Mountain Press. She also serves as creative prose editor for Women’s Studies Quarterly (WSQ) which is published by Feminist Press.

Natassia Rodriguez Ott

Credit: @ntrodriguez11 / Twitter

Natassia Rodriguez Ott is a Research Education Analyst at Research Triangle Institute (RTI). She holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from Stanford University. She is a researcher within RTI’s Center for Career and Adult Workforce Development. Natassia has conducted research for the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative. She is knowledgeable in creating education and employment opportunities for minorities and youth, including education-to-workforce transitions and career and technical education (CTE).

Heidi Hernandez Gatty

Credit: @smbrowngirl / Twitter

Heidi Hernandez Gatty provides guidance to organizations through her business, Small Brown Girl Consulting. She is also co-founder of the site, altmamí, a platform which gathers content relating to the experiences and goals of professional Latinas. Heidi’s background includes diverse fields, such as theatre, technology, and finance. She is passionate about the arts as a vital component to economic and humanistic success. Heidi is also committed to social justice, economic justice, and civic participation.

Annemarie Pérez

Credit: @anneperez / Twitter

Annemarie Pérez is a writer who has been featured in, “Lowriding Through the Digital Humanities” by Punctum Books in which she contributes her expertise regarding Chicana and Chicano digital culture. She is an assistant professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Annemarie possesses an extensive knowledge base in the fields of Latina and Latino literature, including Chicana feminist writers and editors.

Dior Vargas

Credit: @DiorVargas / Twitter

Dior Vargas is a speaker and activist for mental health and works toward removing the stigma of mental illness in the Latinx community. She created the People of Color and Mental Illness Photo Project to bring light to the lack of people of color with mental illness represented in the media. Dior has been featured in publications such as Forbes, Newsweek, NBC News Latino, and The Guardian. She was granted the award of The White House Champion of Change for Disability Advocacy Across Generations.

Raquel Velho

Credit: @rsvelho / Twitter

Raquel Velho is an assistant professor in Science and Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She holds a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from University College London (UCL). Her research includes marginalized and excluded users, including issues of transport accessibility for wheelchair users. Velho has also studied gender representations and gaming addictions, social inclusion in Latin America, and immigrants’ definitions of and engagement with traditional Chinese and Western medicines.

T.J. Raphael

Credit: @TJRaphael / Twitter

T.J. Raphael is the senior producer of the Slate podcast network. She has experience as an editor for the renowned public radio station and podcast producer, WNYC. Raphael has worked as a reporter and editor for the New York Daily News, Folio magazine, and the Legislative Gazette. She has been featured in other notable publications including The Economist, Washington Post, and USA Today.

Flavia Dzodan

Credit: @redlightvoices / Twitter

Flavia Dzodan is a writer and the creator of This Political Woman. She focuses on politics, gender, state interventions, and migration. She covers topics ranging from bigotry to alt-feminism. Flavia includes culture, art, and science in her work. She has written pieces on disability discrimination and technology-related topics such as Big Data and the ethics of community surveillance. Flavia has also contributed her writing talents to The Guardian, libcom, and Global Comment.

Carly Figueroa

Credit: @carlyfigueroa / Twitter

Carly Figueroa is a journalist and Senior Producer for NowThis News. She launched NowThis Her which empowers women and covers issues including gender inequality and violence against women. Carly has been a reporter and anchor for FOX13 in Utah. She helped launch the HuffPost News video team. Carly has also contributed her expertise in the fields of writing, editing, and producing to AOL.


READ: Pioneer, Feminist, Proud Mexican: Katy Jurado Changed Hollywood In The 1950s

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Community Rallies Around Latina Leader Who Needed A Double Lung Transplant Because Of Covid

Fierce

Community Rallies Around Latina Leader Who Needed A Double Lung Transplant Because Of Covid

GoFundMe

There is still so much that we do not know about Covid-19. One of the biggest mysteries is the long term effect of the virus after people recover. One of the most common things caused by Covid is the need for lung transplants. A Latina leader in Milwaukee experienced just that.

Carmen Lerma is a beloved member of the Latino community of Milwaukee.

Lerma was diagnosed with Covid-19 in July. At the time, cases were growing across the country and we knew even less about the virus than we know now. Lerma’s Covid diagnosis led to the beloved community member needing a double lung transplant because of the viciousness of this virus.

“She is very kind. She is very loved,” fellow volunteer and friend Carmen Hernandez said of Lerma to NBC News. “I feel so bad for her situation right now. She can’t even breathe. It’s really hard for me to see her going through this when she’s such an active person.”

Months after her diagnosis, Lerma has a new pair of lungs.

Credit: Carmen Lerma / Facebook

The Covid-19 pandemic is entering a new and terrifying chapter as cases are growing around the world. Countries in Europe are implementing new restrictions to control the spread of Covid and certain states are follow suit to protect residents. Lerma is hoping that her story can help to convince people of the severity of the virus.

Lerma’s story highlights the seriousness of Covid-19 complications after surviving a diagnosis.

Lung transplants for Covid-19 patients are becoming more and more common as more people are infected with the virus. Currently, more than 8 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with Covid. More than 220,000 people have died and cases, which never significantly decreased, are on the rise again in most states.

Lerma is using her story to get people to care about Covid-19.

Credit: Carmen Lerma / Facebook

There has been a lot of misinformation spread about Covid that has contributed to the spikes. President Donald Trump used his own diagnosis to tell people not to worry about the virus and to get out there and live life, something health experts around the world rebuked. Even Harvard University released a study debunking the claim that certain blood types are more resistant or prone to Covid-19.

In one of the most American traditions, friends set up a GoFundMe to help cover the costs of Lerma’s medical care.

The GoFundMe page has raised more than $30,000 of the $100,000 they are hoping to raise to pay for Lerma’s medical costs. She spent months in hospitals fighting the virus that is currently devastating Wisconsin as it spreads unimpeded. Wisconsin is facing one of the worst outbreaks in the U.S. right now after a conservative judge declared Gov. Tony Evers’ restrictions to slow the spread. The state’s Republican Party is suing to reverse the mask mandate, the single strongest tool we have to battle the virus and save lives.

READ: Joe Biden Walks Away With Final Presidential Debate On Healthcare, Covid, And Many Issues

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Social Media Shows Up To Help Abuela Living In Dire Straights While Taking Care Of Disabled Great-Grandson

Things That Matter

Social Media Shows Up To Help Abuela Living In Dire Straights While Taking Care Of Disabled Great-Grandson

Isabel Zamudio / Getty Images

All too often we hear stories involving social media that don’t paint the best picture of the digital platforms. From trolls coming for people or fights and arguments going public to sexual harassment and doxxing, social media has so often been used as a tool to do harm.

Thankfully, though, that’s not always the case.

Now we get to tell the story of how one viral video has helped rescue a 90-year-old abuelita and her disabled 17-year-old great-grandson from dire straights.

A 90-year-old abuela and her great-grandson will soon have a new home thanks to support from social media.

Last week, a video was posted to social media about the dangerous and unsanitary conditions a 90-year-old woman and her great-grandson were living in. The woman, from Veracruz, Mexico, lived with her great-grandson, Pedro Miguel, in a shack with tarps for walls and rusted-out tin roof.

The shack was furnished with not much more than a bed, which got wet every time it rained. López’s children have died, her grandchildren have abandoned her, and Pedro is basically the only family she has.

Since the video went viral, DIF Family Services agency met with López and her grandson to assess their health and announced both would get the medications they need. Meanwhile, Leonor López, has been housed in a shelter for the elderly and Pedro was placed in a state-run home where each will remain until authorities can find a home for her and Pedro.

The great-grandmother and her great-grandson are all the other has.

Credit: Isabel Zamudio / Getty Images

Leonora has cared for Pedro ever since he was abandoned by his mother shortly after birth. The 17-year-old does not speak and suffers from epileptic seizures.

Before being placed in supportive housing, each day Leonor would leave her house with a rope tied to the arm of her great-grandson as they went out to collect whatever they could to earn money. Some days they’d collect aluminum cans or cardboard to sell and some days they’d visit verdulerías or even private homes to dig through the garbage to find something to eat.

Every two months Leonora would receive her disability pension of $2,500 pesos (or about $125 USD), which she had to use to buy medicines for Pedro. She also told Milenio that she owes money from the last time Pedro got severely ill.

“When he gets sick I take him to the hospital or to the Red Cross, but they charge me a lot, because he has seizures. This time he got sick I took him but they charged me $6,400 [pesos or ($320 USD)] for three days of care.”

However, since being taken into assisted care, Pedro has also been enrolled to receive his own disability pension, which will definitely help address his medical costs.

Sadly, there misfortunes haven’t ended there.

In what is truly a disappointing story, often times when Leonor and Pedro have gone out to try and earn what money they can, they’re home is robbed of what little they have. According to their neighbor Rogelio, the community hasn’t come to their support – instead they steal from the family.

“I don’t see someone coming to help her, on the contrary, what little she has there they steal from her, even though she is alone in her house they steal what little she can gather; people take advantage,” Rogelio told Milenio.

Thankfully, the viral video has helped spur change for the family and they’ll soon have a proper home and the government benefits they’re both entitled to.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com