Culture

Latinos Are Some Of The Most Festive People And These Traditions Prove It

@CNNTravel / Twitter

We all experienced that moment when you realized you celebrated holidays a little different in your Latino household. Maybe it was when you realized that they didn’t celebrate Three Kings Day with shoes and boxes filled with hay. Or maybe your realization came when your friends and their families didn’t eat grapes for good luck at their New Years Ever party.

Seeing all of the traditions written down just makes them all the more heartwarming. Read on if you’re already getting warm, fuzzy feelings.

Día de las Velitas honors the beginning of the holiday season.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Huffington Post. 25 September 2018.

In Colombia, the day is celebrated on December 7, but as we already know, Costco begins celebrating on August 20th. You can buy your Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas decorations all at the same time there.

We literally only cook out of toddler size pots during the holidays.

CREDIT: @AnahyCiriza / Twitter

If your tía can’t post a joke picture of one of your primitos in the pot, then it’s not big enough. We eat a lot so there always has to be too much food.

Dancing tías flock to la tamalada at your house for three straight days.

CREDIT: @AliciaWLTX / Twitter

If you’ve never seen a group of mamis y tías making tamales for the holidays, you have not experienced efficiency. It is an assembly line process that will surprise anyone.

We can’t wait for Christmas so we celebrate Buena Noche.

CREDIT: @harmonylael / Twitter

The big family dinner is on Christmas Eve and everyone stays up late drinking coquito, eating waves of flan y natilla, and waiting for the clock to strike midnight. Then all the kids start opening their presents because it’s *technically* Christmas.

The Oaxaca Radish Festival in Mexico is incredible.

CREDIT: @CNNTravel / Twitter

Known as “Noche de Rabanos,” the main square of Oaxaca is flooded with artisan created radish carvings on December 23. They’re often molded into nativity scenes, and there’s always food and dancing.

Boricuas will parranda your casa up.

CREDIT: @CortesBob / Twitter

We thrive on barging into people’s homes and making a party. The parranda is a Puerto Rican tradition that literally entitles you to takeover your friends’ homes with live music. You’ll never know when it’s going to happen so just always be ready with food for an extra 20 Puerto Ricans and you’ll have a good time.

If you’re religious, you participate in La Novena.

CREDIT: @PromiseArizona / Twitter

Every night in the nine days before Christmas, you sing prayers around your local nativity scene. In this picture, Arizona Latinos sang their 2017 novena for the “families unjustly detained.” ✊🏽

After la novena, you might remember singing villancicos.

CREDIT: @SenoritaRacicot / Twitter

They’re basically just Spanish Christmas carols. They go back hundreds of years and are actually poems. Popular songs include “Noche de paz,” “Los peces en el río,” “Campana sobre campana” and “Mi Burrito Saberno.”

In Venezuela, they roll through patinatas.

CREDIT: @ladytrample / Twitter

In the week leading up to Christmas Eve, people will just take to closed-off roads or plazas to roller skate in what they call a “patinata.”

Of course, there are always the posadas.

CREDIT: kat_egli / Flickr

Unlike the standard family masses that include a group of kids acting out the nativity story, posadas take to different neighborhood each night. The children knock on a door and sing a song asking for space at their inn. The hosts will sing back to them and welcome them in for ponche, buñelos and tamales.

You’ll never forget the torture of La Misa del Gallo.

CREDIT: @Rafael_belgom / Twitter

Also known as “Rooster’s Mass,” because it happens at midnight on Christmas Eve. Traditionally, in Rome and Spain, Misa del Gallo is celebrated at the crack of dawn, but when it was assimilated into Mexico, rural families adjusted the tradition so they can go back to their farms and take care of the animals.

Latinos also have Día de los Reyes Magos to look forward to.

CREDIT: @slatinamerica / Twitter

If your parents were super traditional, they would only let you open one present on Buena Noche and wait until Three Kings Day for the rest.

In Puerto Rico, we put a shoebox of hay under the bed the night before Three Kings Day.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. El Boricua. 25 September 2018.

Instead of putting out cookies for Santa, we leave hay under the bed for the camels who are carrying the Three Kings to eat. The next morning, we wake up and there’s a present there instead.

Then there are the NYE traditions like Año Viejo.

CREDIT: @cristiancrespoj / Twitter

Some people ring in the new year by building a cardboard doll that represents the bad times of the last year. Then the doll is set on fire at midnight in hopes of burning away the past and bringing in a brighter new year.

Caption: “The old year of San Juan de Colón in # Tachira pays homage in its burning of this year to Neomar Lander, hero of the # Resistance of # Venezuela assassinated by the Maduro Narcotics. Like other more than 130 young people also killed in the fight for freedom! Maduro will fall !!!!”

The tastiest tradition is to eat twelve grapes after midnight.

CREDIT: @theleaguelady / Twitter

You make a wish for every month of the new year and then they all come true. The tradition originates in Spain, but has become popular all over Latin America.

Leave it to Latinos to make cleaning a ritual tradition.

CREDIT: @HomesiteServ / Twitter

We already do it every Saturday, but every New Years Eve, you spend the whole morning deep cleaning the house, because “a clean slate starts with a clean house.” Cubans will hold on to the bucket of dirty water until midnight and throw it over the balcony to cleanse bad energy from the last year.

Oh, and you have to wear yellow underwear on NYE.

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Korijock. 25 September 2018.

Some people have a tradition to change your underwear at midnight for good luck. Others swear that yellow underwear specifically will bring good luck.

Spend the last day of the year hiding money around your house.

CREDIT: “money in couch” Digital Image. Low Income Financial Help. 25 September 2018.

Ecuadorians claim this tradition which is meant to bring wealth in prosperity in the new year. I mean, it literally works because then you find all the money the next day and feel richer.

Brazilians hurry to the beach to jump over 7 waves after midnight.

CREDIT: “Jumping the waves” Digital Image. BBC. 25 September 2018.

The tradition comes from Candomblé, an African religion that was secretly practiced by the slaves from Bahia. Brazilian NYE parties also include hoards of people wearing all white, to symbolize peace and rebirth.

Dominicans pack a suitcase to their NYE parties.

CREDIT: “Image Credits: www.telegraph.co.uk “ Digital Image. Dubeat. 25 September 2018.

The tradition is to pack a suitcase and walk around the block to ensure safe travel for the following year. My family is lazy. We just take an empty suitcase and walk in circles around the house.


READ: 25 Latino Superstitions That Are Proven Fact

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21 Different Types Of Tamales You Are Definitely Eating For The Next Few Months Because Leftovers

Culture

21 Different Types Of Tamales You Are Definitely Eating For The Next Few Months Because Leftovers

Tim Lauer / Flickr

For many Latinos, tamales represent more than just a dish served during the holidays. For some, it might symbolize memories of spending hours pulling masa with family or eating tamales weeks after Navidad. They are beloved in Mexico and beyond, and with good reason. They are soft, warm, tasty, delicious treats, and good for almost any occasion, special or otherwise. Not to mention that you are porbably eating one today for lunch and nother for dinner because there are so many left over from your holiday celebrations.

1. Burnt Strawberry Tamales

CREDIT: Pinterest

Courtesy of Chef Carlos Salgaldo, these delicious tamales are made by cooking strawberries into a skillet, then mixing them into a buttery masa filling. This is tasty twist on your traditional tamales that strawberry lovers can enjoy. This is a dish that can be easily be tried making at home this holiday season with family and friends.

2. Pollo Con Mole Poblano Tamale

urbantaco / Instagram

This tamale dish can be found in the heart of Dallas, Texas at Urban Taco, a Mexican restaurant that is taking a new spin on what “traditional” is. The Pollo Con Mole Poblano Tamale is a tasty delicacy that fans of mole will certainly enjoy. It’s origins date back to Oaxaca, where mole is one of the regions most famous dishes. This should definitely be on your radar next time you’re in the heart of Texas.

3. Chicken Tamales with Tomatillo-Cilantro Salsa

CREDIT: Pinterest

Cilantro can pack any dish with much needed flavor and that’s the case here with the chicken tamales with Tomatillo-Cilantro salsa. This Mexican-inspired dish is a nice flavorful addition to a traditional tamale with it’s tomato cilantro sauce.

4. Apple Butternut Squash Tamale (Vegan)

sunnysidetamales / Instagram

If meat in your tamale isn’t your thing then this vegan tamale might be your go-to this holiday season. Sunny Side Tamales in Downey, CA makes these tasty tamales and are a great healthy alternative that includes apples, butternut squash and walnuts. This should help keep your holiday dieta goals in tact this year.

5. Hot Cheeto Tamale

fatimas_grill / Instagram

Say hello to the Hot Cheeto tamale! A creation many didn’t think was possible but here it is ready to spice up your holidays. A creation from Fatima’s Grill in Downey, CA, this tamale packs a spicy punch that only Hot Cheetos can give. Drizzled with nacho cheese and Hot Cheeto crumbles, this tamale will have you licking your fingers right after.

6. Gansito Tamale

churritoloco

Gansito snacks filled your childhood with so many delicious memories it’s no surprise that it’s now paired with tamales. Just thinking about the strawberry masa and chocolate Gansito inside makes your mouth water. Churrito Loco located in Moreno Valley, CA sells these delicacies and have already become quite a hit. I’m sure this is one tamale many people will try making at home this holiday season.

7. Strawberry & Cream Cheese Tamale

magalystamalesandmexicangrill / Instagram

Strawberry and Cream Cheese are a great combination alone but combining them into a tamale? Oh yeah! This tamale is sure to satisfy your sweet tooth and your stomach. Magaly’s Tamales and Mexican Grill is the proud creator of this tasty treat and have managed to merge together two of our favorite snacks into one.

8. Tamales de Chocolate y Nuez

CREDIT: Pinterest

What’s not to love here with the as a chocolate based masa takes place of your traditional corn base. With a hint of chile and lightly sweetened with piloncillo, the Tamales de Chocolate y Nuez is sweet treat that every Latino can enjoy. Filled with pecans and chocolate chips these tamales would taste great with a side of cafecito this Navidad.

9. Bean Cheese and Potato Tamale

CREDIT: Pinterest

Sometimes you just got to keep things simple and that applies here with the Bean Cheese and Potato Tamale. These Mexican inspired tamales have an added kick with the addition of Chipotle peppers in Adobo sauce that pack a serious flavorful punch. These are a quick and tasty reiteration of your traditional tamale that everyone in the family will be snacking on.

10. Cookies N’ Cream Tamale

tamaleslosguajardo / Instagram

These tasty treat has people buzzing across the internet and rightfully so. Combining chocolate and tamale is nothing new, so this Mexican restaurant took it to the next level with the Cookies N’ Cream Tamale! Filled with Oreo cream stuffing and a chocolate masa, this tamale might already have you drooling just thinking about it.

11. Spinach Corn Elote

tamaleslosguajardo / Instagram

Looking for something a little on the healthier side? The spinach and corn tamale might just be for you. Filled with cheese, spinach and corn, this tamale has all your essentials when looking for something a little lighter for the holidays. It also works great for vegan only eaters in your family.

12. Black Bean Tamale

CREDIT: Pinterest

Black beans are some of the healthiest types of beans filled with protein and iron that are an essential part of any diet. These black bean tamales are great for vegetarians and vegans as well. The tamale is filled with black beans, onion and a chipotle seasoned masa that will surely please your taste buds.

13. Portobello and Polenta Tamales

CREDIT: Flickr

Wrapped with a corn husk, the portobello and polenta tamale tastes as good as it looks. The distinguishing part of this tamale isn’t just the corn husk but the addition of portobello mushroom that adds a kick. Highly recommend this plate if having friends over and want to impress this holiday season.

14. Chile Rojo Tamale

paraisojuicebar / Instagram

You can’t beat a classic and that’s the case here with the Chile Rojo tamale that many of us grew up eating. Filled with pork, chicken or sometimes beef, the Chile Rojo tamale is a holiday essential. Try adding cilantro or adding some corn to add some more kick into it.

15. Smoky Fiesta Black Bean Tamale

Credit: Pinterest

Here’s another healthy option for vegetarian and vegans eaters with the Smoky Fiesta Black Bean Tamale. Mixed in with green chilies and red bell peppers, it’s hard to not want to try this tamale. Try adding some chipotle sauce to dip in to add even more flavor.

16. Pico de Gallo Green Chile Tamale

shanestamales / Instagram

Pico de Gallo is traditionally used for dipping when it comes to your chips but here it’s part of the main dish, Smothered with cilantro, green chile, and crema ranchera, it’s going to feel like taking a bit out of a burrito. Shane’s Tamales, a vegan tamale vendor in Los Angeles, is behind this dish and works for vegan eaters as well.

17. Sweet Pina Tamale

tamalesdonateretx / Instagram

Candy tamales are nothing new but Tamales Doña Tere has managed to put together quite a spin on it. The Sweet Pina tamale grabs your attention with it pink coloring but the real treat is inside with its sweet taste. There are multiple locations across the U.S. if you want to try this and other specialty tamales.

18. Chipotle Sweet Potato Tamale

CREDIT: Pinterest

Sweet Potato Fries are a healthier alternative to traditional french fries and this is the case here with the Chipotle Sweet Potato Tamale. With more people seeking alternatives when it comes to traditional tamales, sweet potatoes work here as a great and tasty substitute.

19. Chicken Tamale Pizza

CREDIT: Pinterest

While this technically isn’t a “tamale” it has everything a tamale lover can appreciate including a crust! If you want to impress family and friends this holiday with something unique, this might be it. It also works as a gluten-free option and as always meat is optional.

20. Tamale Colordado

CREDIT: Pinterest

The Tamale Colorado is one of the most popular version of the tamale for Guatemalans and is traditionally eaten on Saturdays. The tamale has a dark red savory sauce and contains chicken, pork, or beef alongside green olives. One way to recognize this tamale is with its traditional green wrapping that is seen in most Central American versions of the tamale.

21. Tamal de Carne en Mole

pincheveganchef / Instagram

The Tamal de Carne en Mole is one of the best-looking tamales out there and is a specialty that everyone should taste. Cooked in mole rojo and filled with cheese and bell peppers, it’s a perfect combination for mole and tamale lovers.


READ: The Exhausting Process Of Making Tamales For The Holidays Broken Down In GIFs

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New Years Eve Superstitions And Traditions That We All Swear By Because They Work

Culture

New Years Eve Superstitions And Traditions That We All Swear By Because They Work

@bruccellati / Twitter

We all know that the magic of Jan. 1 is the promise of a fresh slate with mint new opportunities for love, dinero y good luck. Most people get drunk and kiss someone while they watch a giant ball drop in New York.

Latinos have a whole different method to ensure good luck, safe travels and hot sex in the new year and nobody else will understand.

If you’re Camila Cabello, you tweet this every year.

CREDIT: @CCabelloFR / Twitter

In 2016, she admitted the superstitions got to her and now she feels morally obligated to tweet that every year. I get it. Traditions make the magic happen. We bet she does literally all of this, too.

We get drunk off coquito and stuff our bodies with leftover tamales/pasteles.

CREDIT: @Latinegro / Twitter

You make enough tamales or pasteles at Buena Noche to last you until NYE because if your body doesn’t enter the New Year with food so entrenched in tradition, you get the same creepy feeling Camila gets when she considers not tweeting about her last shower. You just do it. You eat and get drunk.

Because we reuse everything, you also make sure everybody gets a chupito de coquito.

CREDIT: @JayomegaSO / Twitter

I don’t know what all this is, but we’re here for the Bacardi and we’re not going to drink it straight. Do as our ancestors taught us and prosper.

You eat 12 grapes at midnight.

CREDIT: @AmandaSalas / Twitter

One for every month of the year. Most of us make a wish for every month if we’re coherent enough to form thoughts.

Before the festivities, you scrub that house clean.

CREDIT: @ChaosAndConrad / Twitter

Because we’re all about the metaphors and superstitions. Clean the juju out of su casa unless you want to carry it all with you into the new year.

And then toss the dirty water out the window.

CREDIT: @chang40 / Twitter

*NOT* down the drain. The superstition is if you throw the bucket of dirty water out the window, that’s what officially washes you of bad juju.

Oh and before midnight, you do one last sweep.

CREDIT: @BraTheo_7 / Twitter

We’re nothing if not thorough. Plus, it’s a way to make sure the kids know that they’re always on the clock.

Lentejas bring you good luck so eat the most.

CREDIT: @bruccellati / Twitter

You also warn your date that the farts will be with them tonight, but it’ll all be worth it because you’re about to be their good luck charm in 2019. Come, come, come.

You run around the barrio with your luggage.

CREDIT: @damarizz14 / Twitter

Well, that’s what we all know we’re supposed to do, but we’re all too lazy and proud to actually go outside and do it. So you run around the house with your luggage so that your year is blessed with travels. It works!

Wear white for prosperity. Never wear black.

CREDIT: @beauty_newnew / Twitter

Maybe it’s the Santería in us, maybe it’s the Brazileño, but wherever this superstition comes from, we abide by its laws. The luck of the new year is all in the color of su ropa.

Want your year de amor? Wear red underwear.

CREDIT: @UndiesMX / Twitter

For some reason, our parents will be the first to tell you that if you wear red underwear, you’ll attract your soulmate in the next year. “It’s the law of attraction,” they say.

Want that money? Wear fresh yellow panties.

CREDIT: @Dingo_Bln / Twitter

I know. I hate the word ‘panties,’ too, but this is the script in the Great Book of Superstitions. They all say to wear yellow panties if you want good fortune next year. Don’t shoot the messenger.

Another way to earn that dough is by holding silver coins in your hand at midnight.

CREDIT: The Late Show / CBS

I mean, this one makes sense–if you follow the Law of Attraction. Make it rain, 2019.

Screw your left foot. You’re standing on your right at midnight to start the year off right.

CREDIT: The Little Mermaid / Disney

Just like we all know to walk onto an airplane with your right foot for life-saving luck, we all know to flamingo it up at midnight. Raise your hand if you made a fool of yourself the first NYE with blanquitos. 🙋🏽

Burn your enemies. Literally.

CREDIT: @Anna_Mazz / Twitter

Burn photos of the men that ghosted you, of the boss who unfollowed you on social media, of every resentment you hold dear in your heart from this terrible, terrible year. Don’t carry it with you–let the fire take it all.

Palo Santo your entire home and cuerpo.

CREDIT: @MendesCrewInfo / Twitter

Some of us use sage but most of us use Palo Santo. We flood the house with it’s purifying smoke to rid the house of ghosts, bad energy, etc. to make room for the good that’ll come with the new year.

Every single light must be on in the house at midnight.

CREDIT: @roshnip77 / Twitter

It’s the one time of year your mami isn’t running around, turning off lights, yelling, “Y que? Piensas que soy un banco?” It “brightens” the new year.

Quick! Do three squats.

CREDIT: GIPHY

Well, it’s more like, get off your ass and stand up. Now sit back down and do that three more times. Voila! You’re going to get married next year. De nada.

It’s 2018 so we’re creating new traditions.

CREDIT: @BadSalishGirl / Twitter

Honestly, mosre people need to get in on this one.

I’ll be saving my energy to smash white corporate supremacy in 2019, hbu?

CREDIT: @Shannon_Grayson / Twitter

What crazy traditions will you keep and which will you bury? Comment below!


READ: NYE Traditions That Seem Weird AF To Everyone Else But Latinos

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