Culture

If You Grew Up As A Tomboy, This Post Might Be Way Too Relatable

While your primas were having fun playing with barbies and giving each other makeovers, you were busy playing freeze-tag and basketball outside with the boys. While being a tomboy is a ton of fun, it also has a few downsides…

If you grew up as a tomboy, one thing you couldn’t stand was when your mom would dress you up with cake-topper dresses.

CREDIT: JESSICA GARCIA

This was absolute torture.

Once you grew older, however, you had more freedom with your wardrobe choices including Halloween costumes.

CREDIT: DALILA MARTINEZ

There was no fun in Halloween without some fake blood or scary mask to put on.

Maybe you didn’t dress up like a cute little princess like other girls, but you always looked like a total badass.

CREDIT: MARIASFACEPAINTINGSB / SHAZAJ1981 / INSTAGRAM

Who said every girl had to be a princess to be cute?

Although it was obvious you preferred to style yourself as a tomboy, people insisted on giving you extra-feminine clothes for your birthday.

CREDIT: MARIBEL ESCALANTE PEREZ

You just had to sit there, pretend that you liked the gift and politely say thank you… for every birthday.

On the bright side, if your brother had the same taste in fashion, his wardrobe also became your wardrobe.

CREDIT: MARIBEL ESCALANTE PEREZ

This is why you always encouraged him to buy you that sweater.

One of the most annoying things was when your mom would tell you “Pareces niño” or when others judged for not being ladylike.

CREDIT: VICKIE PEREZ SALCEDO

Whatever that means…

You got shit for not playing with your primas or sitting at the tía table, but you couldn’t help that you preferred hanging out with all of the boys in your family.

CREDIT: MARIBEL ESCALANTE PEREZ

I mean, they’re so much fun. How could you blame anyone?

And when you discovered your sisters or primas were also tomboys, they became your partners in crime.

CREDIT: ALICIA MEJIA / VICKIE PEREZ SALCEDO

Instead of just playing with dolls, you spent time playing freeze-tag, basketball, WWE wrestling and Yu-Gi-Oh.

And since you’ve been rocking your t-shirts, sneakers and jeans for sooooo many years…

CREDIT: CAROLINA RUGGERO

This has been your go-to outfit since you came out the womb.

…Once you decide to brush your hair, put on a little makeup, and throw on a simple dress just because you feel like it, people always react like this when they see you:

 


They make a huge deal to which you respond like ?.


READ: 9 Fashion Trends Latina Babies Had to Deal With


What did you love and hate about growing up as a Tomboy? Comment and hit the share button below!

Make Your Dad Feel Special This Christmas With A Latino-Inspired Gift That Will Speak To His Soul

Culture

Make Your Dad Feel Special This Christmas With A Latino-Inspired Gift That Will Speak To His Soul

mitú

Oh, man. Dads are great, right? They tell all sorts of terrible jokes and they just want the best for you. That’s why when the holidays roll around, you want to make sure they feel loved with super-thoughtful gifts. But it won’t be too hard for you this year, because you’ve landed here! And there happen to be tons of amazing gift ideas for dads literally right below this introduction. So there; have a read. 

‘El Jefe’ hat

This hat says everything your dad wants people to know. Not only is he a boss, but he is also the boss. No one can handle a carne asada like he can and it’s time he gets to brag about it everywhere.

BBQ bundle

I don’t know about your dad, but mine was always in charge of the carne asada. In his mind, no one else can cook a piece of steak as well as he can. So the best grill master in the world deserves the best gift ever, right? Well, look no further! The BBQ Bundle comes with this El Jefe Apron and a bottle of El Machete Hot Sauce so he can be ready to cook up some carne asada in style.

‘Annoyed in Spanish’ Dad hat

Having a bilingual dad means he can get annoyed in both English and Spanish (lucky you). We feel his pain, so we made this [Annoyed In Spanish] Dad Hat to wear on the days when he simply can’t with people. Stay strong, dad, we love you.

‘Puro Pinche Pari’ Tote

This isn’t just a tote bag, it’s a statement piece. If your dad is a bit of a social butterfly and always has a carne asada to attend to, get him ready for any party with the ‘Puro Pinche Pari’ Tote, and ¡salud! Not to mention, you should make him become a little more green with his own reusable bag.

‘Mi Gente Colombia’ tee

Your dad’s heart belongs to his family, his mother, and his homeland. Help him rep his pride for his country with this ‘Mi Gente Colombia’ Tee, and show the world you’ll never forget where you came from. Don’t worry. If you check out the mitú shop, you can check out all of the different countries that would be perfect for your dad.

‘Papi Chulo’ Hat

Your papi chulo is your ride or die who deserves only the best in this world. Show him how much he really means to you with this Papi Chulo Hat.

‘Pupusas & Curtido’ T-shirt

Pupusas & Curtido built your dad’s Salvadoran body and he must tell it to the world, wearing this amazing shirt. Truly one piece of clothing your father will love. Check out the mitú shop if your dad’s body was built on different foods.

‘Sweat now, tacos later’ water bottle

For the fit dad type, or if he’s just thinking of starting the year with a renewed sense of health and wellness, help him out with this little bottle. The more he works out now, the more tacos he’ll be able to eat later, right? Don’t lose sight of your fitness and goals with the ‘Sweat Now Tacos Later Water’ Bottle, papi.

‘Arepa money’ belt bag

Need something to hold all that hard-earned arepa money of his? Well, look no further. This Arepa Money Fanny Pack is perfect for holding cash, arepas, and whatever else your dad might need!

‘Avo Camo’ Sweatshirt

What’s more dad-like than a camo print? We’ll tell you what would make it better, hidden guacardos in the print, for the avocado obsessed dads out there. Each unique, all-over printed sweatshirt is precision-cut and hand-sewn to achieve the best possible look and bring out the intricate design. What’s more, the durable fabric with a cotton-feel face and soft brushed fleece inside means that this sweatshirt is bound to become his favorite for a long time.

‘Pregúntale a tu Mamá’ t-shirt

Your dad might be the man of the house, but everyone knows your mom is the one who makes all the rules. That’s why we made this Pregúntale A Tu Mamá Tee, which is basically your childhood in wearable form.

‘Back To The Taqueria’ Tee

Where we’re going, we don’t need fork because we’re going back to the taqueria! But we recommend you grab this apron before we sell out.

‘Modelo’ Men’s socks

Wear and drink what you like, it’s that simple. If your dad is a beer enthusiast who enjoys his modelo bien fría, gift him something he’ll like wearing too, like a matching set of socks.

READ: These 13 Latina-Inspired Gifts Will Make Your Mom Feel So Seen This Holiday Season

‘We’re The Ones Making Wigs Modern’: These Female Entrepreneurs Want You To Support Black-Owned Hair Businesses

Fierce

‘We’re The Ones Making Wigs Modern’: These Female Entrepreneurs Want You To Support Black-Owned Hair Businesses

xoxovirginhair / Instagram

According to research, African-American consumers will spend nearly $2 billion on hair-care products, this year alone. And although a lot of that expenditure goes toward products aimed at caring for natural hair —like shampoo, conditioner and styling products, which are also very important— a lot of $$$ is also being spent on wigs and extensions —of terrible quality, may I add. These black women grew tired of fighting and fussing with wigs and hair extensions of bad quality, so they created their own businesses to fix the problem.

Up until recently, products like wigs and extensions were primarily produced by people outside of the black community. And perhaps that’s why there were so many issues.

Twitter @olaleyepeter6

According to Mintel, between 2015 and 2019, the use of braids and extensions by Black consumers in the U.S. grew 64% and the use of wigs spiked 79%. It’s also Black women who are seen wearing the film lace frontals “Oba wigs” and drawstring ponytails and yet, a lot of companies are white or Asian-owned but Black-presenting. “It’s problematic and needs to be discussed,” says Stephanie Nolan, founder of XOXO Virgin Hair.

Nolan first came up with the idea to start her own hair business after working as a model in the early 200s.

Instagram @xoxovirginhair

Ever noticed how hairstylists spend the majority of prep time fussing and fighting with weaves and wigs  before even being able to put them on? “They would have less-than-desirable experiences working with hair extensions or wigs that just weren’t cooperating,” says Nolan. “And it would end up really dragging out photoshoots.”

She had experimented with weaves in her personal life too, and in more than just a few occasions, the hair she bought just didn’t meet her expectations.

Instagram @xoxovirginhair

“I know that the everyday woman also doesn’t have time to fuss with their hair in the morning because she has to be at work at 8:30 in the morning,” she says. “And spending a lot of time on hair just takes away from being able to eat breakfast, being able to commute, so many things.” So she started her own company in 2014, aiming to release a product that would be convenient, easy to use and most importantly, of high quality.

Heat Free Hair by Ngozi Opara

Instagram @heatfreehair

Ngozi Opara owned a hair salon in Washington D.C. around the time when the natural hair movement started to take off. And she started to see a lot of clients that wanted to grow out their natural hair —which more often than not had been straightened or relaxed. They didn’t want to cut off their hair, so thy opted for sew-ins instead. “At the time, there weren’t any extension products on the market that would blend properly for women with coily hair textures (think 3B and 4C),” Opara says. “Clients were using virgin hair, but the only available options all came in straight, wavy and loose curly textures.”

The textures available meant that Opara had to straighten her clients’ hair in order to get it to blend properly, and she wanted to be able to manipulate their hair without using any heat. “I set myself up to be the first company to [make] virgin hair exclusively for natural hair textures.”

In 2013 Opara moved to China to learn about the manufacturing process.

Instagram @heatfreehair

After six months in China, she learned that not only did the factories have no concept of how the product they were making was being used, but also that a lot of the people producing the wigs didn’t know how to create textured hair without using chemicals. After a lot of tests, roundtable discussions and educating, they eventually got to a place of understanding and were able to create a product all parties were proud of. Now, Opara owns her own factory in China —with more than 50 employees.

Gina Knight, an influencer and wig designer based in the U.K., noticed that the same issue was prevalent in hair extensions across the pond.

instagram @ginaatinukeknight

Just as Opara hadn’t been happy with the texture of virgin hair for wigs, Knight couldn’t find options with hair similar to her own texture. “Having to have more of a Eurocentric wig just wasn’t me,” Knight says.

Black entrepreneurship in the wig and extension space is picking up speed but there’s still a lot of work to be done.

instagram @ginaknightwigdesign

“We are the ones who are utilizing [the product] the most, we’re making it modern, we’re making it so that other races want to get in on it and want to wear wigs,” Knight explains in conversation with Fashionista. “But I think people need to be honest with the fact that, in the supply chain, we don’t have a stronghold,” she says. “Along the line, it does fall out of the hands of Black-owned because we have to source from all over.”

Many companies realized there was a market, and they jumped on it without considering the group they’re marketing to.

twitter @morganjerkins

That’s probably what’s most upsetting about how the industry has evolved since these entrepreneurs first started their businesses. “When I created my brand, I had this customer in mind, I had my clients at the time in mind, I had myself in mind,” Opara says. “I shared the same pain points as the people who would benefit from my product and I didn’t even necessarily know it was going to take off, I just wanted to help solve a problem.” It’s unfortunate, she says, because the companies with more power take opportunities away from black female founders that are creating these products for their community.

It’s important to support Black women and their businesses so even more companies can thrive.

Instagram @ginaknightwigdesign

“I feel like it’s my duty almost to try to encourage people to support Black businesses because I know the value that it has for future entrepreneurs,” explains Opara. “But I also feel like, at least for myself as a consumer, I want to know that the brand I’m buying from is a brand that actually cares about me and not just about the money that they’re making from me.”