identity

Here Are 25 Reasons To Love The #LatinaFuerte That Is ‘Jane The Virgin’ And The Latina Behind The Show, Gina Rodriguez

@hereisgina / Instagram

If you have not seen “Jane the Virgin” yet, ?? stop ?? what ?? you’re ?? doing ?? NOW. This is your modern day telenovela, chock full of an actual immaculate conception (read: artificial insemination), Puerto Rican abuelitas that are everyone’s Nana, and d r a m a  that could only brought to you by the Latinas that basically run the show.

Here are 25 more reasons to love the show that just keeps giving back to us all!

1. “Jane the Virgin”  gave the CW Network their first Golden Globes nomination.

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

Why? Because everything Latinas touch is gold. That’s why. Don’t even question me on this one. Gina Rodriguez is also pretty awesome soooo…..

2. Oh, and Gina won that Golden Globe for Best Actress in a TV Series Musical or Comedy.

CREDIT: Video Screenshot 2Digital-Image. Time.com. 21 March 2018.

In her acceptance speech, she thanked God and her father, saying, “”My father used to tell me to say every morning, ‘Today is going to be a great day. I can and I will.’ Well, Dad — Today is a great day. I can and I did.” I’m not crying.

3. The next year, she was included in Eva Longoria and America Ferrera’s joke about the Globes mistaking Latinas for each other.

CREDIT: Entertainment Tonight / YouTube

The Globes mistaked Gina Rodriguez with America Ferrera during the nominations ceremony for the 2016 Awards. America Ferrera introduced herself as “America Ferrera, not Gina Rodriguez,” pointing out that Latinas on screen aren’t one and the same. SMGDH

4. Ivonne Coll, Abuelita in the showwas no nun in her hayday.

CREDIT: @ivonnecollofficial / Instagram

Caption: “Tbt 1969 when I was a hippie! The communes’ name was “El K-rajo” I was surrounded by musicians, artists, craftsmen…and that is the place where I stand that is the place where I started to find the Artist in me… #puertoricolohacemejor #AbrahamBonilla #condominioelcentro #ivonnecoll #AlbaVillanueva #Janethevirgin” ? ? ?

5. Gina Rodriguez, aka Jane, was given a director role in the last season.

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

Oh and she slayed. “We do magical realism, we do fantasy, we do crazy costume changes, we do green screen. For my episode I had a wolf, a stunt, green screen,” Gina told Variety. 

6. …and she hashtagged #TimesUp in her announcement.

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

Caption: “#Janethevirgin Add another Latina director to that list. #TimesUp” She told The View, “As a woman of color, I think that being able to have the opportunity to direct and to be able to direct my show is very exciting.” Agree, agree, agree!

7. Eva Longoria also directed the show for an episode.

CREDIT: @EvaLongoria / Twitter

Because you can’t have enough Latinas telling everyone what to do. It creates the actual magic of “Jane the Virgin,” tú sabes?

8. Gina calls America Ferrera the ‘Moses’ of Latina roles.

CREDIT: America Ferrera in Ugly Betty (2006). Digital Image. IMDB.com. 21 March 2018

In an interview with Backstage, Gina gushes about America: “I think America [Ferrera, who played Betty] did a lot of amazing things for women who weren’t born naturally thin, and America is gorgeous. We are all gorgeous in our own beautiful, unique, perfectly imperfect ways. … That was very helpful to have those people that came before us; the Moses, if you will…the parting of the seas.”

9. Gina Rodriguez gives credit of her talent to NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts.

CREDIT: BUILD Series / YouTube

In an interview with BUILD Series, she literally points out her teacher, Rosemary Quinn. “Rosemary Quinn is the best. You want to be an actress? Learn from that woman. ‘Cause she will change your life. Clearly, clearly.” And then she started tearing up. #Same

10. Before that, Gina was one of thirteen teenagers accepted into Columbia University’s Theatrical Collaboration.

CREDIT: Video Screenshot 2Digital-Image. Time.com. 21 March 2018.

She was 16. Look at that muñeca linda, I just want to pinch her cheeks!! And now I want to pinch myself. I am my mother.

11. Like ‘Ugly Betty,’ Jane doesn’t wear makeup.

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

America Ferrera is one of the first to represent a normal Latina in American living room televisions and us more curvy, non-beauty pageant winning Latinas felt more fire than ever. And while not all of us are pregnant virgins, Jane is guapa AF, just like us.

12. Oh, and she’s not about being pigeonholed in her sexuality.

CREDIT: @HereisGina / Twitter

So don’t ask, k? Just embrace that we’re all attracted to her, no matter how you identify.

13. Gina is all about using her “Jane the Virgin” fame for good.

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

Sometimes, your T-shirt says it all in this pic of her at the Women’s March in 2017. Caption: “Sisterhood squad. #WomensMarch”

14. The executive producer, Jennie Snyder Urman, wanted the show to be a cross between “Ugly Betty” and “Gilmore Girls.”

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

Brava, especially if you want to add “Como Agua Para Chocolate” and ‘True Detective’. TBH, “Jane the Virgin” is chock full of hallucinations of choirs singing about sex, actual characters impaled on ice sculptures, everyone’s telenovela-obsessed abuelita and a modern day immaculate conception.

So, yeah. It’s not like any other show.

15. Gina Rodriguez declined a breakout role in Devious Maids before auditioning for “Jane the Virgin.”

CREDIT: @deviousmaids / Instagram

“I want to affect people, I want to create change, and there are sacrifices that come along with that.” Gina was offered a role in “Devious Maids” and, because it didn’t align with her mission she sacrificed that break-out role, and good thing!

16. Diane Guerrero, aka Lina, also auditioned for a role on “Devious Maids.”

CREDIT: @dianeguerrero / Instagram

“I wanted the part so bad,” she told Remezcla. Guerrero didn’t get the role, but we’ve been crushing on her hard all throughout “Orange is the New Black” and “Jane the Virgin.” I don’t think my heart could handle another show.

17. Gina is the youngest of three sisters.

CREDIT: Video Screenshot 2Digital-Image. Time.com. 21 March 2018.

All the academic theories about youngest siblings are lost on Gina. She paves her own path (in case it wasn’t the most obvious).

18. Her older sister paid for her education at NYU Tisch School of the Arts.

CREDIT: Video Screenshot 2Digital-Image. Time.com. 21 March 2018.

Ivelisse Rodriguez Simon is an investment banker, and I trust her with all my money. The middle sister, Rebecca, is a doctor. That is a well-educated group of Latinas. #BoricuaPrideAF

19. Their parents are Puerto Rican.

CREDIT: Video Screenshot 2Digital-Image. Time.com. 21 March 2018.

They were born and raised in Chicago, and taught that they can do anything they set their minds to. They grew up Catholic and Gina recalls giving up any self-doubt while waiting to find out if she got the role of Jane to God. And then screaming on the street when she did snag the role. #BoricuaFire

20. Gina once played Frida Kahlo in a play.

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

Oh, and it was a world premiering play called, “The Last Moments in the Life of Frida Kahlo” at the American Stage Theatre. This pic though is just your casual celebration in a Frida Kahlo themed party.

21. You’ll probably find Casper the Dog on set.

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

#WomensRights & #AnimalRights–you’ll find it all on the set of “Jane the Virgin.” And all throughout Gina’s Insta account. I mean, Casper *deserves* to be treated like a star.

22. “Jane the Virgin” is based on Venezuelan telenovela “Juana la Virgen.”

CREDIT: RCTV / YouTube

In the original, Juana is only 17 years old and ends up escaping to the mountains with Rafael, her baby daddy. Here’s to hoping Jane finds her happy ending… on a mountain of grilled cheese sandwiches.

23. No Latina-run show could tolerate anything less than leading male actor, Justin Baldoni’s adorable obsession with his now-wife.

CREDIT: Wayfarer Entertainment / YouTube

Watch this 25 minute proposal video and don’t cry. Then watch his TED Talk, “Why I’m Done Trying to be ‘Man’ Enough”. Don’t cry. Dare you.

24. Gina is the co-founder of ethical lingerie company Naja.

CREDIT: Gina Rodriguez. Digital Image. Naja.com. 21 March 2018

Naja is a lingerie company that primarily employs single mothers, allowing them to work from home while still taking care of their families. It also uses recycled goods, and is ethically sourced. Of course Gina is part of this. Yes, I’ll buy your lingerie, bae!

25. Gina wants to be the Latina Meryl Streep and we’re here for it.

CREDIT: @hereisgina / Instagram

Ever since she was 15, she’s had the dream to be the Latina Meryl Streep. Gina tells Backstage, “[Meryl] transforms and gets gritty and peels off layers of her skin. She’s not afraid. And I’m not afraid either. Jane is a gift I can give, a platform I can use to talk to girls and women and say, ‘Yeah, I’m not makeup-ed up, I’m not weaved-up, and I am beautiful.’ ”

Victoria Cruz Sees Hope For The Future Of LGBTQ+ Rights 50 Years After She Witnessed The Stonewall Riots

Things That Matter

Victoria Cruz Sees Hope For The Future Of LGBTQ+ Rights 50 Years After She Witnessed The Stonewall Riots

iamsamkirk / Instagram

The history of Gay Rights in the country date back to the late ’60s and the epicenter was Manhattan. The core fighters of the LGBTQ community include Marsha P. Johnson, Scott G. Brown, Sylvia Rivera, and a slew of other pioneers. The sad thing is this generation has passed or will very soon, which is why we have to honor their legacy while they’re still alive. One of those people is an inspiring person in our Latinx community.

Victoria Cruz, who is in her 70s, is a survivor of the Stonewall Riots and is still very much a part of the fight for LGBTQ rights.

Instagram/@marinadelbey

Cruz, who was born in Puerto Rico, is one of 11 children that grew up in New York. While Cruz was born a male, she knew since she was in high school that she was a woman. Back in the ’60s, that was no easy thing to admit, yet her Puerto Rican family supported her transition.

While her family and close community were supportive, Cruz faced immense hardships including harassment from the police, and later in the ’90s, she was assaulted.

Instagram/@hispanic_history_

Four of her coworkers physically assaulted her, which left her in ruins.

“I was very angry. Very angry,” Cruz said in an interview with Vanity Fair in 2017. “The worst part of it is that I couldn’t feel the ground beneath me, and added that she was “was contemplating suicide,” at the time.

But she overcame that tough time and is recognized as a leader in the movement for Gay Rights.

Yet, despite the hate and violence she faced, Cruz pushed on standing up for her LGBTQ+ family.

“I used to go to St. Vincent’s on my lunch hour…and I would see her,” Cruz told The Advocate. “She called to me, ‘Victoria, come here.’ And she always called me Dickie, you know, so when she said, ‘Victoria come here,’ I knew that she meant business. I sat down, and she looked at me. She said, ‘Try to keep the community together because we are our own worst enemy. And there’s power in numbers.’ And then she said, ‘The world will come up to try to divide us, and when you divide a community, you conquer it. So try to keep the community together.’”

As a trans woman and pioneer of the LGBTQ movement, Cruz said positive change is happening right now.

Instagram/@florentinoreyes

“I’m optimistic, and I’m hopeful that it will change for the better,” she told The Advocate. “There’s power in numbers. If we unite and keep united, we can make the future different, and what we want it to be. By galvanizing one another, we galvanize each other. And with the same frame of mind, the same frame of thought, we can change what’s happening.”

Trans rights are the new frontier in the LGBTQ+ movement. Despite the contributions made to the movement by trans women of color, cis members of the LGBTQ+ community ignore their plight or add to the harassment.

“There is so much hatred directed toward queer people, particularly transgender women of color. For what? Why? I think it may be about people’s own insecurities about their own identities and sexualities. And further, people don’t know their history,” Cruz told BC/Stories. “The transgender experience isn’t new. It’s as old as the human experience, and anyone who does their research would know this. I think society needs to be educated, and maybe after being educated, empathy will follow.”

READ: Zuri Moreno Made Sure The Trans Community In Montana Remained Safe

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Culture

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Keds

It’s always really cool to see a big name brand embrace the art of our Latinidad. It’s like a nod to all of the great Latinx artisans who add beauty and color to our culture. In fact, seeing consumers enthusiastically welcome these goods feels like further validation. With this in mind, it makes this new collaboration all the sweeter for us art and fashion lovers.

Keds is collaborating with designers Thelma Dávila and Lolita Mia on a line inspired by the Latina-created brands.

Instagram / @Keds

In what the shoe company is calling a “collaboration fiesta,” Keds released three fun and vibrant new designs.

Some of the shoes borrow inspiration from Thelma Dávila’s colorful Guatemalan textiles. Alternatively, other pairs utilize Lolita Mia’s festive fringe as embellishments. These touches combine with Keds’ original platform shoes to make a unique product.

Of the partnership with these new brands, Keds’ website says:

“It’s so rewarding to be able to be a part of the professional and personal growth of women who decided to follow their dreams. Entrepreneurs (especially female ones) are always brave, they’re risk-takers that believe strongly in themselves. And we believe in them too. We’re so excited to introduce you to our latest for-women-by-women collaborations.”

The Thelma Dávila brand is named after its Guatemalan founder.

Keds

The company specializes in designing and crafting unique pieces by hand. Furthermore, their products utilize Guatemalan textiles, leathers and non-leather materials. Obviously, this collaboration is built on a solid relationship between the two brands. Since last year, Keds retail locations have carried Thelma Dávila bags and products in stores.

On their website, Keds said the design collaborations were intent on “taking geometric design and color cues from [Dávila’s] native culture, our classic Triple Kick gets transformed into a fiesta-ready standout.”

Founded by jewelry artisan and entrepreneur, Elena Gil, Lolita Mia is a Costa Rican accessory brand.

Keds

While studying abroad in Italy, Gil made a significant personal discovery. She realized that ethnic crafts and traditions were very alike across regions. Specifically, they were similar in cultural importance. In light of this, she decided to start her own brand. Lolita Mia’s handmade products embrace what Gil has coined a “Universal Ethnic Luxury.”

Of the collaboration with Lolita Mia, Keds’ website reads:

“[The] aesthetic shines through in these playful renditions of our platforms in the form of fun, festive fringe and punchy tropical shades.”

The Ked × Lolita Mia collaboration has two designs while the Ked x Thelma Dávila collab is made up of one.

Instagram / @lolitamiacr

“Triple Tassel” is a multicolored platform with purple, pink, orange and white tassels attached to the laces. “Triple Decker Fringe” is an off-white platform slip-on with multi-colored fringe and golden embellishments on top. The “Triple Kick” features a neutral platform with Guatemalan textile accents around the bottom.

Each design is priced at $70 a pair. Moreover, they are available exclusively on Keds’ website. Be sure to order yours today and add a little extra Latinx flare to your summer looks.

Paid Promoted Stories